Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

Dates: Last 2 Years

You searched for subject:(Land grabs). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Uppsala University

1. Mesic, Selma. The 'Green' Land Grabs : How the rush for biofuels is impacting land rights in Tanzania.

Degree: Government, 2019, Uppsala University

The last decade has witnessed an exponential interest in land investments across numerous industries in the developed countries. Africa has been particularly targeted for investments, increasingly for biofuel production. Though land investments can boost local economies when realized in an equitable manner, many reports also point to large-scale displacements and loss of land for local landowners. There remain empirical unclarities on the subject, and theoretical and analytical frameworks are underdeveloped in explaining the conditions and factors that determine outcomes.   This thesis is exploring the effects of land investments on land tenure security through the lens of credible commitment and neo-patrimonial theory, with a focus on biofuel production in Tanzania as the chosen qualitative case study. The analysis is based on two specific jatropha investments in Tanzania: Sun Biofuels and Diligent Ltd.   The research contribution of the thesis is in merging two theoretical approaches, CCT and Neo-patrimonialism, and applying it to a new research area of land investments in order to establish an understanding of their effects on local land tenure security.  

Subjects/Keywords: biofuel; land grabs; land investments; Tanzania; CCT; Neo-patrimonial theory; land tenure security; Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies); Statsvetenskap (exklusive studier av offentlig förvaltning och globaliseringsstudier)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mesic, S. (2019). The 'Green' Land Grabs : How the rush for biofuels is impacting land rights in Tanzania. (Thesis). Uppsala University. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384254

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mesic, Selma. “The 'Green' Land Grabs : How the rush for biofuels is impacting land rights in Tanzania.” 2019. Thesis, Uppsala University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384254.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mesic, Selma. “The 'Green' Land Grabs : How the rush for biofuels is impacting land rights in Tanzania.” 2019. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Mesic S. The 'Green' Land Grabs : How the rush for biofuels is impacting land rights in Tanzania. [Internet] [Thesis]. Uppsala University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384254.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mesic S. The 'Green' Land Grabs : How the rush for biofuels is impacting land rights in Tanzania. [Thesis]. Uppsala University; 2019. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384254

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Erasmus University Rotterdam

2. Park, Clara. Gender, generation and agrarian change: Cases from Myanmar and Camodia.

Degree: 2019, Erasmus University Rotterdam

textabstractRural communities, physical landscapes and social relations have been deeply transformed in countries in Southeast Asia by the effects of the global land rush. The surge of initiatives around industrial development, hydropower projects, monocrop commercial plantations, mining and conservation has given way to a process of appropriation of land and natural resources unprecedented in scale, speed and scope. This has been underwritten by a favourable environment of neoliberal market-driven reforms, trade policies and investment flows that are the expression of the fast-track development model embraced by most countries in the region, including Cambodia and Myanmar. Today, the climate change agenda and the commitments to reduce emissions have created the conditions for an expanded menu of land and resource grabs justified in the name of the environmental good, so-called ‘green grabs’. Southeast Asia has thus become a “core region of concern in land grab studies”. This body of work has also begun to integrate gender and, to a lesser extent, generational perspectives in analyses of agrarian and environmental transformations, advancing a more nuanced understanding of the impacts of land grabs. However, to date literature in these areas remains limited, while, as in land grabs studies, ‘local people’ and ‘local communities’ are often assumed to be homogeneous groups of people with similar interests, identities and aspirations. This has not only severe analytical limitations but also political implications. Building on feminist political economy and with feminist political ecology as the overarching intellectual and political project, this thesis contributes to furthering the understanding of the implications of land grab in Southeast Asia with an analysis of gendered and ‘generationed’ patterns of rural dispossession, incorporation and political reactions from below with empirical evidence from Cambodia and Myanmar. The thesis also aims to make the case for centring gender and generations into the politics of land grabs and argues that there can be no real social justice if attention is not paid to everyday struggles in diverse contexts and without a commitment to changing power relations that perpetuate social injustices.

Subjects/Keywords: Gender; generation; agrarian change; land grabs; environment; social justice; Myanmar; Cambodia; feminist political ecology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Park, C. (2019). Gender, generation and agrarian change: Cases from Myanmar and Camodia. (Doctoral Dissertation). Erasmus University Rotterdam. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/116458

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Park, Clara. “Gender, generation and agrarian change: Cases from Myanmar and Camodia.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Erasmus University Rotterdam. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1765/116458.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Park, Clara. “Gender, generation and agrarian change: Cases from Myanmar and Camodia.” 2019. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Park C. Gender, generation and agrarian change: Cases from Myanmar and Camodia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Erasmus University Rotterdam; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1765/116458.

Council of Science Editors:

Park C. Gender, generation and agrarian change: Cases from Myanmar and Camodia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Erasmus University Rotterdam; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1765/116458

.