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You searched for subject:(Kukai). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University College Cork

1. Twomey, Margaret P. Towards enhanced divine-human-earth relations: a Christian-Buddhist contribution.

Degree: 2014, University College Cork

The central claim of the dissertation is that lesser known and somewhat neglected, yet influential thinkers, within classical religious traditions have something worthwhile to contribute to the kind of ethos we should adopt in the face of the world’s various environmental crises. Moreover an exploration of such perspectives is best done in dialogue, particularly between Eastern and Western thought. I examine this claim primarily through a dialogue between the Christian philosopher John Scottus Eriugena and the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Kūkai (Kōbō Daishi). This dialogue, framed by the triad of divine-human-earth relations, primarily emphasises the oneness of all reality, and it finds expression in Eriugena’s concept of natura or phusis and Kūkai’s central teaching that the phenomenal world is the cosmic Buddha Dainichi. By highlighting this focus, I contribute to the existing academic field of ecology and religion on the subject of holism. However, I go beyond the materialist focus that generally marks such ecological holism within that field, offering instead a more metaphysical approach. This is indicated through my use of the concept of ‘immanental transcendence’ to describe Eriugena’s and Kūkai’s dynamic, numinous and mysterious notion of reality, as well as my exploration of Eriugena’s concept of theophany and Kūkai’s notion of kaji. I further explore how both philosophers highlight the human role in the process of reaching enlightenment—understood as attaining union with the whole. In that regard, I note significant differences in their positions: in particular, I note that Kūkai’s emphasis on bodily practices contrasts with Eriugena’s more conceptual approach. Finally to bolster my claim, I examine some ecologically oriented understandings of contemporary phenomenological approaches found particularly in the work of Jean-Luc Marion and to a lesser extent Merleau-Ponty, arguing that these reflect notions of reality and of the human role similar to those of the medieval philosophers. Advisors/Committee Members: Parkes, Graham.

Subjects/Keywords: Eriugena; Kukai; Japanese Buddhist philosophy; Medieval Christian philosophy; Ecological theology; Gift and givenness; Jean-Luc Marion; Ecology and religion; Environmental philosophy; Ecophenomenology; Transcendence and immanence; Environment

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APA (6th Edition):

Twomey, M. P. (2014). Towards enhanced divine-human-earth relations: a Christian-Buddhist contribution. (Thesis). University College Cork. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1834

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Twomey, Margaret P. “Towards enhanced divine-human-earth relations: a Christian-Buddhist contribution.” 2014. Thesis, University College Cork. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1834.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Twomey, Margaret P. “Towards enhanced divine-human-earth relations: a Christian-Buddhist contribution.” 2014. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Twomey MP. Towards enhanced divine-human-earth relations: a Christian-Buddhist contribution. [Internet] [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1834.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Twomey MP. Towards enhanced divine-human-earth relations: a Christian-Buddhist contribution. [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1834

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Prooi, Dennis. The Taipei Tianhou-gong and the Shikoku Henro: A Place-based Approach.

Degree: 2017, Leiden University

This thesis makes use of the place-based approach to pilgrimage to investigate the past and present role of the Taipei Tianhou-gong (a temple in the Ximen district of Taipei) as a crossroads of pilgrimage. Past approaches to pilgrimage have either been blind to the particularities of pilgrimage across cultures, or placed too much stress on the contested character of pilgrimage sites. My primary aim is to show how the two discourses that informed the Taipei Tianhou-gong in turn in the past, at present do not compete or exclude one another, but rather appear to run parallel. Before the Taipei Tianhou-gong as it stands today was built, the site was home to the Kobo-ji, a temple constructed during the Japanese period that functioned as the headquarters of Shingon Buddhism in colonial Taiwan. The Kobo-ji eventually served as the starting point of a copy of the Shikoku Henro (a 1,200-kilometer-long Japanese pilgrimage circuit) in Taipei. After the Japanese left Taiwan in 1945, the Kobo-ji was remodeled by the Taiwanese and dedicated to the Fujianese sea goddess Mazu. Today, and with the current popularity of the actual Shikoku Henro among the Taiwanese, we see how the Shingon Buddhist heritage of the Taipei Tianhou-gong is in the process of being reactivated. This reactivation presents us with a significant case of a pilgrimage site where meaning is not contested, but which is instead characterized by a parallelism of discourses. Advisors/Committee Members: Veere, Henny van der (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Pilgrimage; Shikoku; Japan; Taiwan; Folk religion; Taipei; Mazu; Kobo Daishi; Kukai; Henro

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Prooi, D. (2017). The Taipei Tianhou-gong and the Shikoku Henro: A Place-based Approach. (Masters Thesis). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/51887

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prooi, Dennis. “The Taipei Tianhou-gong and the Shikoku Henro: A Place-based Approach.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Leiden University. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/51887.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prooi, Dennis. “The Taipei Tianhou-gong and the Shikoku Henro: A Place-based Approach.” 2017. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Prooi D. The Taipei Tianhou-gong and the Shikoku Henro: A Place-based Approach. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Leiden University; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/51887.

Council of Science Editors:

Prooi D. The Taipei Tianhou-gong and the Shikoku Henro: A Place-based Approach. [Masters Thesis]. Leiden University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/51887

3. Proffitt, Aaron P. Mysteries of Speech and Breath: Dohan's (1179-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu sho and Esoteric Pure Land Buddhism.

Degree: PhD, Asian Languages and Cultures, 2015, University of Michigan

Through my analysis and translation of Dohan’s (1179-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu sho (Compendium on the Secret Contemplation of Buddha), I have investigated the broader Japanese and East Asian Buddhist context for “Esoteric” (aka, Tantra, Vajrayana, etc.) approaches to rebirth in the “Pure Land” paradise of the Buddha Amitabha, and opened up new avenues for academic inquiry into ritualized speech acts as technologies for negotiating the perceived gulf between enlightened Buddhas and ordinary beings, as well as Buddhist theories of religious diversity, death, and rebirth. In Part I (Chapters I-III), I synthesize traditional and contemporary Chinese, Japanese, and English language scholarship on the history of Esoteric Buddhism and Pure Land Buddhism, and read across a diverse range of premodern Chinese and Japanese ritual and doctrinal texts in order to demonstrate that throughout East Asian Buddhist history, Pure Land Buddhism and Esoteric Buddhism functioned not simply as two discrete or exclusive “kinds” of Buddhism, but rather as mutually informative dimensions of a diverse Mahayana ritual and devotional environment. In Part II (Chapters IV-VI), I investigate Dohan’s contemporary and local context, focusing in particular upon the Koyasan mountain monastic complex where Dohan became one of the most significant scholar-monks of the medieval Shingon tradition, and demonstrate that the nenbutsu (the ritual chanting of the name of the Buddha Amitabha, “Namu Amida Butsu”) was fundamental to the religious lives of the elite monastics and peripatetic ascetics that made up the heterogeneous groups on Koyasan. In Part III, I present my annotated translation of the first fascicle of Dohan’s Himitsu nenbutsu sho. In the first fascicle of this text, Dohan lays out his vision of the diversity of Pure Land practice, wherein exoteric “dualist” (this world and the Pure Land are separate) and esoteric “non-dualist” (this world and the Pure Land are one) conceptions of the nature of salvation are allowed to stand together in an exo/esoteric dialogic tension, without necessarily being resolved. Advisors/Committee Members: Auerback, Micah L. (committee member), Carr, Kevin Gray (committee member), Brose, Benjamin (committee member), Payne, Richard Karl (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Pure Land Buddhism, Esoteric Buddhism, Medieval Japanese Buddhism; Tantra, Pure Land, Vajrayana, Amitabha, mantra, nenbutsu, Dohan; Kukai, Shinran, Shingon, Jodo Shinshu, Koyasan, Kamakura; East Asian Languages and Cultures; Religious Studies; Humanities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Proffitt, A. P. (2015). Mysteries of Speech and Breath: Dohan's (1179-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu sho and Esoteric Pure Land Buddhism. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111511

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Proffitt, Aaron P. “Mysteries of Speech and Breath: Dohan's (1179-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu sho and Esoteric Pure Land Buddhism.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111511.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Proffitt, Aaron P. “Mysteries of Speech and Breath: Dohan's (1179-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu sho and Esoteric Pure Land Buddhism.” 2015. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Proffitt AP. Mysteries of Speech and Breath: Dohan's (1179-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu sho and Esoteric Pure Land Buddhism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111511.

Council of Science Editors:

Proffitt AP. Mysteries of Speech and Breath: Dohan's (1179-1252) Himitsu nenbutsu sho and Esoteric Pure Land Buddhism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/111511

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