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You searched for subject:(Kilohertz electrical stimulation). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Patel, Yogi A. Optimization and application of kilohertz electrical stimulation nerve block to autonomic neural circuits.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering (Joint GT/Emory Department), 2017, Georgia Tech

Kilohertz Electrical Stimulation (KES) enables a rapid, reversible, and localized inhibition of peripheral nerve activity. Discovered in the early 1900’s, the utility and application of KES nerve block to treat symptoms of various disease states is nearly non-existent. Although a handful of clinical products utilize KES, it is highly debated and unknown if these products provide therapeutic benefit or, if they do, whether they do it by achieving a true conduction block of nerve activity or through other unknown mechanisms of action. Furthermore, many critical questions still re- main about the optimal electrodes, waveforms, and approaches necessary for clinical utility of KES nerve conduction block. In this thesis, I investigate multiple facets of KES nerve conduction block. In Part I, I present electrode optimizations that reduce energy requirements and ensure optimal KES nerve conduction block. I de- scribe critical geometry and materials considerations for electrode design, quantify charge characteristics of KES waveforms, and discuss how electrode characteristics can impact clinical device design. In Part II, I demonstrate the utility of KES in a variety of somatosensory and autonomic neural circuits to treat symptoms arising from immune and metabolic disorders. I show that KES nerve block can selectively block conduction in different fiber-types for selective inhibition of motor and sensory information. I then demonstrate the ability of KES nerve block to provide direction- specific stimulation of the vagus nerve for modulation of the innate immune system. Finally, I demonstrate the utility of KES nerve block for modulation of glucose metabolism. Collectively, the methods, tools, and results presented in this thesis significantly impact the design and clinical translation of KES therapies. Advisors/Committee Members: Butera, Robert J. (advisor), O'Farrell, Laura (committee member), Burkholder, Thomas (committee member), Rozell, Christopher (committee member), English, Arthur (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Kilohertz electrical stimulation; Neuromodulation; Neural interfaces; Autonomic nervous system; Neuroscience

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Patel, Y. A. (2017). Optimization and application of kilohertz electrical stimulation nerve block to autonomic neural circuits. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60121

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Patel, Yogi A. “Optimization and application of kilohertz electrical stimulation nerve block to autonomic neural circuits.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60121.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Patel, Yogi A. “Optimization and application of kilohertz electrical stimulation nerve block to autonomic neural circuits.” 2017. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Patel YA. Optimization and application of kilohertz electrical stimulation nerve block to autonomic neural circuits. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60121.

Council of Science Editors:

Patel YA. Optimization and application of kilohertz electrical stimulation nerve block to autonomic neural circuits. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/60121


Duke University

2. Medina Daza, Leonel E. Quantitative Analysis of Kilohertz-Frequency Neurostimulation .

Degree: 2016, Duke University

Mainstream electrical stimulation therapies, e.g., spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and deep brain stimulation, use pulse trains that are delivered at rates no higher than 200 Hz. In recent years, stimulation of nerve fibers using kilohertz-frequency (KHF) signals has received increased attention due to the potential to penetrate deeper in the tissue and to the ability to block conduction of action potentials. As well, there are a growing number of clinical applications that use KHF waveforms, including transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) for overactive bladder and SCS for chronic pain. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of action of KHF stimulation. The goal of this research was to analyze quantitatively KHF neurostimulation. We implemented a multilayer volume conductor model of TES including dispersion and capacitive effects, and we validated the model with in vitro measurements in a phantom constructed from dispersive materials. We quantified the effects of frequency on the distribution of potentials and fiber excitation. We also quantified the effects of a novel transdermal amplitude modulated signal (TAMS) consisting of a non-zero offset sinusoidal carrier modulated by a square-pulse train. The model revealed that high-frequency signals generated larger potentials at depth than did low frequencies, but this did not translate into lower stimulation thresholds. Both TAMS and conventional rectangular pulses activated more superficial fibers in addition to the deeper, target fibers, and at no frequency did we observe an inversion of the strength-distance relationship. In addition, we performed in vivo experiments and applied direct stimulation to the sciatic nerve of cats and rats. We measured electromyogram and compound action potential activity evoked by pulses, TAMS and modified versions of TAMS in which we varied the amplitude of the carrier. Nerve fiber activation using TAMS showed no difference with respect to activation with conventional pulse for carrier frequencies of 20 kHz and higher, regardless the size of the carrier. Therefore, TAMS with carrier frequencies >20 kHz does not offer any advantage over conventional pulses, even with larger amplitudes of the carrier, and this has implications for design of waveforms for efficient and effective TES. We developed a double cable model of a dorsal column (DC) fiber to quantify the responses of DC fibers to a novel KHF-SCS signal. We validated the model using in vivo recordings of the strength-duration relationship and the recovery cycle of single DC fibers. We coupled the fiber model to a model of SCS in human and applied the KHF-SCS signal to quantify thresholds for activation and conduction block for different fiber diameters at different locations in the DCs. Activation and block thresholds increased sharply as the fibers were placed deeper in the DCs, and decreased for larger diameter fibers. Activation thresholds were > 5 mA in all cases and up to five times higher than for conventional (~ 50… Advisors/Committee Members: Grill, Warren M (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical engineering; Dorsal column fiber; Kilohertz-frequency; Nerve excitation; Spinal cord stimulation; Transcutaneous electrical stimulation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Medina Daza, L. E. (2016). Quantitative Analysis of Kilohertz-Frequency Neurostimulation . (Thesis). Duke University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10161/12841

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Medina Daza, Leonel E. “Quantitative Analysis of Kilohertz-Frequency Neurostimulation .” 2016. Thesis, Duke University. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10161/12841.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Medina Daza, Leonel E. “Quantitative Analysis of Kilohertz-Frequency Neurostimulation .” 2016. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Medina Daza LE. Quantitative Analysis of Kilohertz-Frequency Neurostimulation . [Internet] [Thesis]. Duke University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/12841.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Medina Daza LE. Quantitative Analysis of Kilohertz-Frequency Neurostimulation . [Thesis]. Duke University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/12841

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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