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You searched for subject:(Kenyan Sign Language). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of California – San Diego

1. Morgan, Hope E. The Phonology of Kenyan Sign Language (Southwestern Dialect).

Degree: Linguistics, 2017, University of California – San Diego

Kenyan Sign Language (KSL) is a thriving national sign language used by tens of thousands of signers in Kenya, and which emerged out of two deaf schools in western Kenya in the early 1960s. In this thesis, I provide a thorough description and analysis of the basic phonological components of the KSL lexicon used in the southwestern region of Kenya (formerly south Nyanza Province).This phonological grammar of (SoNy)KSL makes contributions in three domains. In the descriptive domain, it provides a thorough report of the basic units in the main phonological parameters; i.e., Handshape (Ch. 4), Location (Ch. 5), and Movement (Ch 6, 7), as well as the evidence for the distinctiveness of each unit. The description for Movement and Location are particularly noteworthy because those parameters have received less attention in sign linguistics in general compared to Handshape.In the methodological domain, the grammar is based on a KSL Lexical Database built for this project, in which over 50 phonetic characteristics of 1,880 non-compound signs were coded. This database is currently one of only a few such richly coded lexical databases of sign languages. In addition, this grammar employs a rigorous approach to determining lexical contrast, which has yielded a separate dataset of 461 minimal pairs (Ch. 3). This dataset is unique in sign linguistics and reveals patterns of lexical contrast that were not previously known—and which have generated new hypotheses about how lexical contrast may be constrained by degrees of visual similarity.Finally, this thesis makes a theoretical contribution by comparing how different models of sign phonology can account for sign types in KSL. By evaluating the explanatory power of the main theories of sign phonology on the basis of specific descriptive data, this thesis gives unique insights into the theoretical validity of these models. It also proposes modifications in some cases, especially with regard to how the Dependency Model (DPM) can account for the representation of movement features and their relationship to the timing tier. In addition, a new movement feature, [dispersed], is described and its implementation worked out in the DPM.

Subjects/Keywords: Linguistics; Kenyan Sign Language; language documentation; lexical contrast; minimal pairs; phonology; sign language

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Morgan, H. E. (2017). The Phonology of Kenyan Sign Language (Southwestern Dialect). (Thesis). University of California – San Diego. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9bp3h8t4

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Morgan, Hope E. “The Phonology of Kenyan Sign Language (Southwestern Dialect).” 2017. Thesis, University of California – San Diego. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9bp3h8t4.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Morgan, Hope E. “The Phonology of Kenyan Sign Language (Southwestern Dialect).” 2017. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Morgan HE. The Phonology of Kenyan Sign Language (Southwestern Dialect). [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – San Diego; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9bp3h8t4.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Morgan HE. The Phonology of Kenyan Sign Language (Southwestern Dialect). [Thesis]. University of California – San Diego; 2017. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9bp3h8t4

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Nairobi

2. Akach, Philemon A O. Sentence types in Kenyan sign language: a structuralist approach .

Degree: 1991, University of Nairobi

This study is an attempt to identify and describe the various sentence types of the Kenya Sign Language (KSL) using structuralist approach. After giving some background information on the language and the elements of sign language, (SL) structure in chapter one and two, we identify the sentence types in KSL. We then proceed to analyse the syntactic structure of each type. The types identified and analysed are Declaratives, Asserted Declaratives statements, interrogatives sentences: Yes/No questions, wh-questions, conditional statements, Topicalization, Imperative sentences and Rhetorical sentences. We also show that the declarative sentence, is the most basic type. We proceed to discuss how the non-manual grammatical markers (NGMs) play an important syntactical role in determining the modality of manualy formed construction of different sentence types. We have observed that the word-sign order remains the same as the declaratives but the NGMs vary. the NGMs identified and used in this study are 'q' 'neg', 'nod' 'wh-q', It', 'cond', 'Imp', and 'rhet-q'. On the whole our work shows that the aforementioned NGMs form an important part of descriptive tools for the analysis of KSL sentences.

Subjects/Keywords: Sentence types; Kenyan sign language

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Akach, P. A. O. (1991). Sentence types in Kenyan sign language: a structuralist approach . (Thesis). University of Nairobi. Retrieved from http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/18432

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Akach, Philemon A O. “Sentence types in Kenyan sign language: a structuralist approach .” 1991. Thesis, University of Nairobi. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/18432.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Akach, Philemon A O. “Sentence types in Kenyan sign language: a structuralist approach .” 1991. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Akach PAO. Sentence types in Kenyan sign language: a structuralist approach . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Nairobi; 1991. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/18432.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Akach PAO. Sentence types in Kenyan sign language: a structuralist approach . [Thesis]. University of Nairobi; 1991. Available from: http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/18432

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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