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You searched for subject:(Kaupapa M ori). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Auckland

1. Taitimu, Melissa. Ng?? whakawhitinga: standing at the crossroads : M??ori ways of understanding extra-ordinary experiences and schizophrenia.

Degree: 2008, University of Auckland

Indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities are being diagnosed with schizophrenia at significantly higher rates than majority groups all around the world. Aetiological literature reveals a wide range of causal explanations including biogenetic, social and cultural factors. A major limitation of this body of research is the assumption of schizophrenia as a universal syndrome. When viewed through an indigenous lens, experiences labelled schizophrenic by Western psychiatry have been found to vary from culture to culture in terms of content, meaning and outcome. The current project aimed to investigate M??ori ways of understanding experiences commonly labelled ???schizophrenic???. The philosophical frameworks that guided the research were Kaupapa M??ori Theory and Personal Construct Theory. A qualitative approach was used and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 57 participants including tangata whaiora (service users), tohunga (traditional healers), kaumatua/kuia (elders), P??keh?? clinicians, M??ori clinicians, cultural support workers and students. Four categories were derived from qualitative thematic analysis. These being: making sense of the experiences, pathways of healing, making sense of the statistics and what can we do about the statistics. Overall, M??ori constructions related to other indigenous constructions of mental illness and wellbeing cited in the international literature but were in stark contrast to current psychiatric constructions. The current project indicated M??ori participants held multiple explanatory models for extra-ordinary experiences with the predominant explanations being spiritual. Other explanations included psychosocial constructions (trauma and drug abuse), historical trauma (colonisation) and biomedical constructions (chemical brain imbalance). Based on these findings, recommendations for the development of culturally appropriate assessment and treatment processes are presented. Over the last couple of centuries a single paradigm, the medical model, has come to dominate the explanation and treatment of illness in Western society. Via legal and political means, indigenous models of illness and wellness have been wiped out or forced to the margins of many societies. This thesis aims to challenge the dominant medical model that has privileged psychiatric knowledges while suppressing others by repositioning indigenous construction at the centre of the research via a Kaupapa M??ori framework. Chapter One aims to deconstruct current medical constructions by presenting psychiatry as a culture in itself as opposed to a discipline dedicated to scientific truths. This chapter posits that the culture of psychiatry has lead many clinicians to suffer from ???cultural blindness??? when working with indigenous and ethnic minority groups. Chapter One uses the tools of science to question the scientific validity and reliability of the construct ???schizophrenia???. I conclude that this construct is ???unscientific??? in itself. I will also look at three themes… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. John Read, Dr. Tracey McIntosh.

Subjects/Keywords: M??ori psychology; schizophrenia; Kaupapa M??ori theory; Indigenous psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taitimu, M. (2008). Ng?? whakawhitinga: standing at the crossroads : M??ori ways of understanding extra-ordinary experiences and schizophrenia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Auckland. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3367

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taitimu, Melissa. “Ng?? whakawhitinga: standing at the crossroads : M??ori ways of understanding extra-ordinary experiences and schizophrenia.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Auckland. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3367.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taitimu, Melissa. “Ng?? whakawhitinga: standing at the crossroads : M??ori ways of understanding extra-ordinary experiences and schizophrenia.” 2008. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Taitimu M. Ng?? whakawhitinga: standing at the crossroads : M??ori ways of understanding extra-ordinary experiences and schizophrenia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Auckland; 2008. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3367.

Council of Science Editors:

Taitimu M. Ng?? whakawhitinga: standing at the crossroads : M??ori ways of understanding extra-ordinary experiences and schizophrenia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Auckland; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/3367


Queensland University of Technology

2. Carey, Melissa. A transformative journey of cultural recovery: te ao Maori.

Degree: 2016, Queensland University of Technology

Historical and contemporary cultural trauma continues to impact on the health and well-being of Indigenous people globally. Located within Australia this thesis employs Kaupapa Maori theory and autoethnography to explore a process of cultural recovery and healing. This is a self-decolonising journey from cultural trauma to recovery, through the researchers cultural immersion within te ao Maori. This interwoven approach speaks to the new era of qualitative social research. Concluding that cultural recovery and the healing of cultural trauma are connected to the core of self and to subjective experiences of well-being, influencing health outcomes for Maori people.

Subjects/Keywords: ; ori; Health; Well-being; Intergenerational; Trauma; Healing; Kaupapa Mā; ori; Australia; Recovery; Autoethnography; ODTA

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carey, M. (2016). A transformative journey of cultural recovery: te ao Maori. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/101534/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carey, Melissa. “A transformative journey of cultural recovery: te ao Maori.” 2016. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed September 20, 2020. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/101534/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carey, Melissa. “A transformative journey of cultural recovery: te ao Maori.” 2016. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Carey M. A transformative journey of cultural recovery: te ao Maori. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2016. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/101534/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Carey M. A transformative journey of cultural recovery: te ao Maori. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2016. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/101534/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Auckland

3. Crengle, Suzanne Marie. M?? Papatuanuku, ka Tipu ng?? R??kau: a case study of the well child health programme provided by Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust.

Degree: 1997, University of Auckland

This thesis presents a case study of the well child health programme provided by Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust. Child health is acknowledged as a health gain priority area. Well child health programmes are considered to be important components of child health services, and have been provided in New Zealand since 1907. The health status of M??ori children remains poorer than that of non-M??ori children. Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust is an urban M??ori organisation which provides a comprehensive range of health, training and employment, and social services. It begun providing health services in 1991 and is an example of a ???by M??ori, for M??ori??? health service. M??ori have expressed the belief that ???by M??ori, for M??ori??? health services will be more accessible, acceptable, and appropriate for the M??ori community. However, there is little information available about ???by M??ori, for M??ori??? services. This thesis provides a description of the well child health programme and a ???by M??ori, for M??ori??? health service. It also discusses the well child health programme within broader social and political contexts. Kaupapa M??ori theory forms the theoretical framework of this thesis. Qualitative methodology and methods, including focus groups, individual interviews and document analysis, were used to develop the case study. The Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust well child health programme is described in detail, and discussed. Conclusions are drawn and several important issues are raised. Advisors/Committee Members: Fiona Cram.

Subjects/Keywords: Child health; Maori health; Health services research; Case study; Kaupapa M??ori research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crengle, S. M. (1997). M?? Papatuanuku, ka Tipu ng?? R??kau: a case study of the well child health programme provided by Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust. (Masters Thesis). University of Auckland. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2292/5995

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crengle, Suzanne Marie. “M?? Papatuanuku, ka Tipu ng?? R??kau: a case study of the well child health programme provided by Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust.” 1997. Masters Thesis, University of Auckland. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/5995.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crengle, Suzanne Marie. “M?? Papatuanuku, ka Tipu ng?? R??kau: a case study of the well child health programme provided by Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust.” 1997. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Crengle SM. M?? Papatuanuku, ka Tipu ng?? R??kau: a case study of the well child health programme provided by Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Auckland; 1997. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/5995.

Council of Science Editors:

Crengle SM. M?? Papatuanuku, ka Tipu ng?? R??kau: a case study of the well child health programme provided by Te Wh??nau O Waipareira Trust. [Masters Thesis]. University of Auckland; 1997. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/5995

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