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You searched for subject:(John Glassco). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Dalhousie University

1. Lent, Vanessa. "I am not I": Late Modernism and Metafiction in Canadian Fiction.

Degree: PhD, Department of English, 2012, Dalhousie University

This dissertation argues that a number of works of Canadian fiction usually designated as modernist fit more properly into the category of “late modernism”: a category that has only recently begun to emerge as a bridge between post-war modernism and emergent postmodernism. These works are aligned by their use of abstract, absurdist, or surrealist narrative structures and consequently by their refusal to adhere to conventional strictures of social realism. Because of this refusal, literary critics have identified the late-modernist emphasis on narrative form as necessarily ahistorical or apolitical. Conversely, I argue, these works are socially and politically engaged with the historical contexts and material conditions of their inception, composition, and consequent reception. I argue herein that the works of Sheila Watson, Elizabeth Smart, Malcolm Lowry, and John Glassco tend towards non-representational narrative forms, and in doing so, they engage in modes of cultural critique. These critiques are focused by a negotiation of what has been multiply identified as a “contradiction” in modernist art: while on the one hand the texts break with traditional forms of social-realist narrative out of a need to find new forms of expression in an effort to rebel against conservative, bourgeois sensibilities, on the other hand they are always produced from within the self-same socio-political economy that they critique. Whether this position is identified as a “modernist double bind” (following Willmott) or a “central paradox” of modernism (following Eysteinsson), I have argued that each author negotiates these internal contradictions through the integration of autobiographical material into their writing. In reading these works as part of a unified late-modernist narrative tradition, this dissertation aims to destabilize critical and popular understandings of mid-century Canadian prose and argue for an alternate reading of artistic interpretation of the twentieth-century Canadian condition. Such a reading challenges current canon formation because it destabilizes traditional critical accounts of these texts as instances of eccentric expression or singular moments of genius. Instead, we are asked to consider seriously the tendency for play with subjectivity and autobiographical material as an interpretive strategy to express the mid-century, post-war condition. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Christl Verduyn (external-examiner), Dr. Trevor Ross (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Carrie Dawson (thesis-reader), Dr. Jerry White (thesis-reader), Dr. Anthony Enns (thesis-reader), Dr. Dean Irvine (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Modernism; Late Modernism; Canadian Literature; Metafiction; Sheila Watson; Elizabeth Smart; Malcolm Lowry; John Glassco

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APA (6th Edition):

Lent, V. (2012). "I am not I": Late Modernism and Metafiction in Canadian Fiction. (Doctoral Dissertation). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15367

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lent, Vanessa. “"I am not I": Late Modernism and Metafiction in Canadian Fiction.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Dalhousie University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15367.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lent, Vanessa. “"I am not I": Late Modernism and Metafiction in Canadian Fiction.” 2012. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Lent V. "I am not I": Late Modernism and Metafiction in Canadian Fiction. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15367.

Council of Science Editors:

Lent V. "I am not I": Late Modernism and Metafiction in Canadian Fiction. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15367


McGill University

2. Kokotailo, Philip, 1955-. Literary subterfuge in John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse.

Degree: MA, Department of English., 1984, McGill University

Subjects/Keywords: Glassco, John. Memoirs of Montparnasse.; Decadence in literature.; Dandies in literature.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kokotailo, Philip, 1. (1984). Literary subterfuge in John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse. (Masters Thesis). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile65296.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kokotailo, Philip, 1955-. “Literary subterfuge in John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse.” 1984. Masters Thesis, McGill University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile65296.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kokotailo, Philip, 1955-. “Literary subterfuge in John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse.” 1984. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kokotailo, Philip 1. Literary subterfuge in John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McGill University; 1984. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile65296.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Kokotailo, Philip 1. Literary subterfuge in John Glassco's Memoirs of Montparnasse. [Masters Thesis]. McGill University; 1984. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile65296.pdf

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