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You searched for subject:(Japanese colonial period). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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NSYSU

1. Kao, Hsing-yu. The Female Images in the Novels of Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Period.

Degree: Master, Chinese Literature, 2015, NSYSU

The Japanese colonial period is the beginning of Taiwan New Literature and the modern novel. At the conflict of nations, classes, traditions and modernity, gender issue became one of the focuses. How the female images were unfolded in literature writing during the period is the subject of the essay. The thesis first discusses the femalesâ real situation and the contributing factors that made female a subject in writings at that time, then analysis the female images in novels in different stages, and explores the features of male and female writers in writing females. Critical realism in Taiwan novels were spread in the background of nonviolence resistance to Japanese government and the enlightenment flourishing in society, so the instrumentality of novels for reform and critique cannot be ignored. In many novels, writers often describe femalesâ situation for the purpose to criticize the colonial empire and for the thought of opposing colonial and capitalism oppress. Simultaneously, the applications of female subject were also connected and formed with various perspectives involving the writersâ life tracks, situations during the times and their writing styles. By observing the background of times, the characteristics of writers, and the female perspective, the whole female images could be viewed more clearly and completely. The composing of female images is a reflection of reality, a material and symbol for concepts, also a carrier of imagination and the ground for subjective self construction, is a result interwoven with the country, society and individuals. Advisors/Committee Members: Ya-hui Yang (chair), Bao-chai Jiang (chair), Jen-nien Chai (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: feminine writing; female images; Japanese colonial period; novels; post-colonalism discourse

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APA (6th Edition):

Kao, H. (2015). The Female Images in the Novels of Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Period. (Thesis). NSYSU. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0726115-152637

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kao, Hsing-yu. “The Female Images in the Novels of Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Period.” 2015. Thesis, NSYSU. Accessed May 31, 2020. http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0726115-152637.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kao, Hsing-yu. “The Female Images in the Novels of Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Period.” 2015. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Kao H. The Female Images in the Novels of Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Period. [Internet] [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2015. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0726115-152637.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kao H. The Female Images in the Novels of Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Period. [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0726115-152637

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Chen, Chiu-Jhin. FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS, HISTORY, AND ART EDUCATION: A WEB OF TAIWANESE VISUAL CULTURAL SIGNS.

Degree: PhD, Art Education, 2007, Penn State University

In this study, I propose a model for learning Taiwanese visual culture through tracing the roots of Taiwanese visual culture and the layers of Taiwanese cultural identity. Understanding the ways in which the Taiwanese construct their contemporary identities and the ways a study of their signs could contribute to the Taiwanese art education curriculum are the main goals of this study. Adopting the qualitative cultural study method, this study addressed three research questions: (1) What are the roots of Taiwanese visual culture? (2) What does one specific group of middle-class family photographs from the 1920s-1940s contribute to our understanding of Taiwanese culture and identity? and (3) What might the in-depth, multifaceted interpretation of these special forms of visual culture contribute to the content of the elementary and junior high school Arts and Humanities curriculum? I searched for interview participants who had access to plenty of family photographs taken between 1920 and 1940, who had been in school during the Japanese colonial period, and who were willing to be interviewed about their family history. The ultimate goal of this study is twofold: the first investigation examines the heritage of Taiwanese visual culture through a literature review, photographic interpretation, and ethnographic interviews; the second investigation explores the content of the Taiwanese elementary and junior high school Arts and Humanities curriculum in order to build Taiwanese visual cultural identity. My research produced three main results. First, photography functioned as a window or mirror for society and enabled me to see Taiwanese visual cultural roots and cultural diversity. Second, there existed the phenomena of different depths of assimilation. In the Japanese colonial period (1895-1945) the Taiwanese were affected directly by the Japanese for about three generations. The Taiwanese were spontaneously assimilated into Japanese civilization through fashion, modern schooling, industry, medicine, hygiene, and the improvement of material life, but as far as ethnic assimilation, the spiritual domain, they were still hesitant. Third, the reflection of the cultural combination and conflicts was among the Taiwanese, the Japanese, the Chinese, and the West. The Taiwanese culture is a hybrid culture, reflecting multiple societies, and creating a new style of visual culture that is not the traditional Chinese, Japanese, nor Western culture. The Taiwanese might not be able¡Xor want¡Xto pursue orthodox cultural status. They accepted continual change. The Taiwanese built their own unique visual cultural identity. Family portrait photographs reveal phenomena that exist between private and public lives¡Xphenomena existing in the space between local and national culture. When we dig more deeply, we find more signs within the visual cultural web. The photographs reveal how a personal identity is built¡Xhow individuals come to know their culture and be understood with who they are. School teachers can design their curricula through…

Subjects/Keywords: family photographs; art education; Japanese colonial period in Taiwan; Taiwanese visual cultural identity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, C. (2007). FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS, HISTORY, AND ART EDUCATION: A WEB OF TAIWANESE VISUAL CULTURAL SIGNS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/7986

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Chiu-Jhin. “FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS, HISTORY, AND ART EDUCATION: A WEB OF TAIWANESE VISUAL CULTURAL SIGNS.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Penn State University. Accessed May 31, 2020. https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/7986.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Chiu-Jhin. “FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS, HISTORY, AND ART EDUCATION: A WEB OF TAIWANESE VISUAL CULTURAL SIGNS.” 2007. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Chen C. FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS, HISTORY, AND ART EDUCATION: A WEB OF TAIWANESE VISUAL CULTURAL SIGNS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Penn State University; 2007. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/7986.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen C. FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS, HISTORY, AND ART EDUCATION: A WEB OF TAIWANESE VISUAL CULTURAL SIGNS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Penn State University; 2007. Available from: https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/7986


University of Michigan

3. Chao, Hui-Hsuan. Musical Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule: A Historical and Ethnomusicological Interpretation.

Degree: PhD, Music: Musicology, 2009, University of Michigan

This dissertation examines Taiwanese musical experience and musical life in the early Japanese colonial period, beginning in 1895, to understand how the Japanese and the Taiwanese negotiated their historically imposed roles through music. When Japan colonized Taiwan, Japanese colonizers faced the problem of how to establish governance on the newly acquired territory, while the Taiwanese confronted the uncertain future of becoming the colonized. The decade following the colonial annexation, 1895-1905, was a transitional period when both Taiwanese and Japanese negotiated new historical experiences and cultural agendas. Music was an essential part of their encounter. This dissertation applies the theoretical concept of musiking – the manipulation of sonic and non-sonic objects of music in musically particularized sites and with musically strategic and driven processes to negotiate specific agendas with targeted partners – to analyze Taiwan musical experiences in the early Japanese colonial period. The Japanese colonizers and the Taiwanese colonized subjects presented and manipulated musical works and performances (objects) in several major venues and occasions (sites) in order to negotiate their concerns and agendas (processes). Such a portrait of colonial Taiwan thus addresses the dynamic interactions between the foreign colonizing power and the local colonized population through musical activities. By analyzing how Japanese and Taiwanese musiked together for their own agendas in the early colonial period, this dissertation argues that the emerging new and hybridized soundscape of colonial Taiwan, comprised of a diversity of musics and cultures, set the foundation for the development of the modern and complex musical Taiwan in the twentieth century. Advisors/Committee Members: Lam, Joseph S C (committee member), Becker, Judith O. (committee member), Robertson, Jennifer E. (committee member), Stillman, Amy (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Colonialism and Music; Taiwan  – Colonial Period, 1895-1945; Music and Colonial Modernity; Music and Politics; Japanese Colonialism in Taiwan; Musiking; Humanities (General); Humanities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chao, H. (2009). Musical Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule: A Historical and Ethnomusicological Interpretation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/63711

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chao, Hui-Hsuan. “Musical Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule: A Historical and Ethnomusicological Interpretation.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed May 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/63711.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chao, Hui-Hsuan. “Musical Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule: A Historical and Ethnomusicological Interpretation.” 2009. Web. 31 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Chao H. Musical Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule: A Historical and Ethnomusicological Interpretation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2009. [cited 2020 May 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/63711.

Council of Science Editors:

Chao H. Musical Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule: A Historical and Ethnomusicological Interpretation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/63711

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