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Macquarie University

1. McCormack, Alan. Australia-Indonesia: the quest for a better relationship : could FDI have a role?.

Degree: 2018, Macquarie University

Theoretical thesis.

Bibliography: pages 278-316.

Chapter 1. Introduction  – Chapter 2. What theoretical traditions support this thesis?  – Chapter 3. How wide is the culture divide?  – Chapter 4. Australia’s foreign policy – does it enhance the bilateral relationship?  – Chapter 5. Australia’s security – is a strong Indonesian relationship vital?  – Chapter 6. Trade security theory: seeking conflict mitigating causal mechanisms  – Chapter 7. Trade-security theory – the basis of an FDI-security hypothesis  – Chapter 8. FDI and developing economies: does Indonesia need Australian FDI?  – Chapter 9. Australia-Indonesia – FDI’s relationship opportunity  – Chapter 10. Conclusion  – Bibliography  – Appendices.

Australia’s defence planners argue that a strong and productive relationship with Indonesia is critical to Australia’s national security. The Defence Department’s quest to reorder the relational status quo is focused on establishing interdependencies that contribute to Indonesia’s economic development and help mitigate threats to Australia’s interests. Yet, in practice the relationship is marked by tensions, cultural indifference and limited economic engagement. Australia’s formal and person-to-person associations with Indonesia are often problematic and the current commercial engagement is paltry. My thesis uses a deductive secondary source analysis and small n semi-structured interview method to establish whether foreign direct investments (FDI) could change those realities. It has three parts. First, I identify why indifference is the hallmark of this bilateral relationship. The core issues are the legacies of Australia’s anti-Asian immigration policies, the Non-Aligned Movement, cultural differences, conflicts in East Timor and political ineptness. Second, because there is little IR theory on the conflict mitigating role of FDI, I examine the insights that trade security studies may provide into FDI’s likely security effects. I argue that capitalist peace thesis research that has identified causal mechanisms through which trade promotes security are likely to have equal or stronger effect in the case of FDI. Third, I review Indonesia’s published economic development plans which demonstrate a need for substantial foreign direct investments. Based on the precedent of OECD member support for FDI ventures and the likely provisions of an Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA), I argue that a government economic diplomacy initiative could facilitate Australian corporate efforts to meet many of Indonesia’s FDI requirements. My conclusion is that there is potential for Australian FDI to build economic interdependence, support Indonesia’s economic development and help counter the poverty and political exclusion that fosters extremist violence. That outcome aligns with Australian Defence Department assessments that a faltering Indonesia could become a well-armed, unfriendly, authoritarian nationalist near-neighbour, whereas an economically strong, democratic Indonesia would be…

Advisors/Committee Members: Macquarie University. Department of Modern History, Politics and International Relations.

Subjects/Keywords: Investments, Foreign  – Indonesia; Australia  – Relations  – Indonesia; Indonesia  – Relations  – Australia; Australia; Indonesia; security; FDI; Outward Foreign Direct Investment Agency

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCormack, A. (2018). Australia-Indonesia: the quest for a better relationship : could FDI have a role?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Macquarie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1266695

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCormack, Alan. “Australia-Indonesia: the quest for a better relationship : could FDI have a role?.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Macquarie University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1266695.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCormack, Alan. “Australia-Indonesia: the quest for a better relationship : could FDI have a role?.” 2018. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

McCormack A. Australia-Indonesia: the quest for a better relationship : could FDI have a role?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Macquarie University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1266695.

Council of Science Editors:

McCormack A. Australia-Indonesia: the quest for a better relationship : could FDI have a role?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Macquarie University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1266695


University of Central Florida

2. Hajek, Patricia. Migrant Workers In South-east Asia:economic And Social Inequality In Indonesia, Malaysia, And Singapore.

Degree: 2008, University of Central Florida

This thesis explores migrant labor in South-East Asia by addressing the topic of migration, specifically its causes and consequences. Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore are countries that experienced rapid industrialization from the mid-1960s throughout the 1990s. Simultaneously, the migration of people within the region increased. A key focus is how regional development has contributed to migration flows and to the position of migrants in these countries. Using a migration systems framework from Castles' and Miller's The Age of Migration (2003) that draws on theoretical elements from economics, historical-structuralism and transnationalism, this thesis finds that several factors explain the causes of migration in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore and the lasting implications migration had in their respective societies. Both macro- and micro-structures influenced industrialization and a migratory labor market. The historical, political, and economic linkages shared among the countries, alongside regional integration and attractive government-led industrialization strategies contributed to large-scale flows of migrant workers within the region. These same factors made migration and settlement increasingly difficult. Consequently, human rights violations of migrants in these countries became more pronounced. Singapore's dominance of Indonesia and Malaysia in the semi-periphery of South-East Asia conditioned the environment that migrants faced in their host societies. Migrant workers from Indonesia and Malaysia enjoyed better treatment in Singapore, because of its targeted labor, immigration, and social policies. In all three countries, settlement patterns of migrant workers were virtually similar to government commitments to prevent assimilation. Advisors/Committee Members: Morales, Waltraud Q..

Subjects/Keywords: migrants; migration; human rights; settlement; Southeast Asia; labor rights; Indonesia; Malaysia; Singapore; newly industrializing countries; developing countries; foreign direct investments; Political Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hajek, P. (2008). Migrant Workers In South-east Asia:economic And Social Inequality In Indonesia, Malaysia, And Singapore. (Masters Thesis). University of Central Florida. Retrieved from https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3745

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hajek, Patricia. “Migrant Workers In South-east Asia:economic And Social Inequality In Indonesia, Malaysia, And Singapore.” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Central Florida. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3745.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hajek, Patricia. “Migrant Workers In South-east Asia:economic And Social Inequality In Indonesia, Malaysia, And Singapore.” 2008. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hajek P. Migrant Workers In South-east Asia:economic And Social Inequality In Indonesia, Malaysia, And Singapore. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Central Florida; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3745.

Council of Science Editors:

Hajek P. Migrant Workers In South-east Asia:economic And Social Inequality In Indonesia, Malaysia, And Singapore. [Masters Thesis]. University of Central Florida; 2008. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3745

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