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You searched for subject:(Interwar Japan). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Long, Hoyt J. On uneven ground: Provincializing cultural production in interwar Japan.

Degree: PhD, Language, Literature and Linguistics, 2007, University of Michigan

This dissertation seeks to show that a full appreciation of literary and cultural production in Japan's interwar period (1918-1933) requires careful examination of how that production took shape within spatially uneven trajectories of economic and cultural development. It does so by focusing specifically on the domestic periphery and revealing it to be both an alternative and contested site of cultural production. Framing the study is writer, poet, and educator Miyazawa Kenji (1896-1933), who as a no-name author working in the provinces sought to blur the real and imagined borders dividing city and country, modernity and tradition, Art and rural community. A careful analysis of the strategies he employed in that effort leads toward a better understanding of the spatial structures that influenced cultural production outside the center; of the decidedly modern, and in some cases cosmopolitan, character of rural social transformation; and of the ways that provincial localities were being rethought in the wake of continued integration of cultural and economic markets. While scholarship on this period tends to take for granted Tokyo's centrality in the aesthetic realm, treating it as an undeniable given, the aim here is to bring this centrality into greater relief by viewing it through the eyes of those for whom it was both obstacle and object of critique. In doing so, we are able to more effectively interpret contemporary responses to the uneven field of cultural production as attempts to open a synchronous and provincializing dialogue – one that looked forward as much as it looked back, that looked outside the nation as much as within, that looked to reorganize space as much as to keep it the same. Miyazawa proves fascinating in this regard, because for him it was a dialogue carried out in arenas as diverse as children's fiction (dowa), science education, amateur theatre, and farmers' art. All are considered in the course of argument as I situate Miyazawa's own strategies within the local sites of their enunciation, the intellectual and institutional networks from whence they were born, and the practices of place-making to which they did, and still do, contribute. Advisors/Committee Members: Ito, Ken K. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Children's Literature; Cultural Production; Ground; Interwar; Japan; Miyazawa, Kenji; Provincializing; Uneven

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APA (6th Edition):

Long, H. J. (2007). On uneven ground: Provincializing cultural production in interwar Japan. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/126498

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Long, Hoyt J. “On uneven ground: Provincializing cultural production in interwar Japan.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/126498.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Long, Hoyt J. “On uneven ground: Provincializing cultural production in interwar Japan.” 2007. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Long HJ. On uneven ground: Provincializing cultural production in interwar Japan. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/126498.

Council of Science Editors:

Long HJ. On uneven ground: Provincializing cultural production in interwar Japan. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/126498

2. Lee, Sujin. Problematizing Population: Politics of Birth Control and Eugenics in Interwar Japan.

Degree: PhD, History, 2017, Cornell University

This dissertation aims to answer comprehensively the simple, yet significant question of why and how population became a political problem in interwar Japan (late 1910s - late 1930s). During Japan’s interwar years, there was a growing call among social scientists, social reformers, and government elites to solve “population problem (jinkō mondai).” These Japanese intellectuals attributed the population problem in Mainland Japan (naichi) to a wide array of social ills including poverty, unemployment, and physical, mental, and moral degeneration, and considered various solutions to reform the Japanese population. The prevalence of this population discourse must be understood as an obvious symptom of the growing attention among contemporary Japanese intellectuals and bureaucrats to the population: the size and quality of the population became an object of knowledge and an objective of government. Moreover, the ambiguous, yet productive category of the Japanese population provides a revealing look at the complex social relations and colonial mobility in the Japanese Empire. This dissertation focuses on modern governmentality and imperialism that were embedded in the interwar discourse of the population problem. Using Michel Foucault’s conceptualization of discourse, I consider the population discourse to encompass different, or even conflicting agendas, languages, and movements that shaped and reshaped the population problem. The close reading of the arguments of different population discourses, including Neo-Malthusianism, the proletarian birth control and eugenics movement, feminist advocacy for voluntary motherhood, and the government's investigation into population problems, reveals the distinctive nature of Japan's interwar period in two senses: 1) a dynamic space where various discourses on population issues—particularly, birth control, eugenics, and population policy—continuously interwove sexual and biological issues with politico-economic ones; and 2) a crucial stage for reconstructing Japanese modernity through integrating scientific progressivism, social reformism, and imperial nationalism. In sum, in revisiting interwar Japan through the frames of governmentality and imperialism, my dissertation illuminates how the multiple discourses on population constituted and categorized desirable bodies to reproduce, and how these discourses intersected with modern subjectivities—namely, gender, nation, and class. Advisors/Committee Members: Sakai, Naoki (chair), Seth, Suman (committee member), Koschmann, Julien Victor (committee member), Hirano, Katsuya (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Asian history; Asian studies; birth control; eugenics; imperialism; Interwar Japan; population problem; Science history; biopolitics

interwar Japan. Various fellowships, conferences, and dissertation awards were another crucial… …1 The Politics of the Population Problem in Interwar Japan CHAPTER 2 The Population… …Science CHAPTER 6 Conclusion: 178 The Reappraisal of Interwar Japan through the Lens of… …Problem in Interwar Japan The advancement of hygiene and sanitation and welfare work in any… …Japan during the interwar period in order to clarify the real population problem. Rather, my… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, S. (2017). Problematizing Population: Politics of Birth Control and Eugenics in Interwar Japan. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56840

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Sujin. “Problematizing Population: Politics of Birth Control and Eugenics in Interwar Japan.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Cornell University. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56840.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Sujin. “Problematizing Population: Politics of Birth Control and Eugenics in Interwar Japan.” 2017. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lee S. Problematizing Population: Politics of Birth Control and Eugenics in Interwar Japan. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cornell University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56840.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee S. Problematizing Population: Politics of Birth Control and Eugenics in Interwar Japan. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cornell University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56840

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