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You searched for subject:(Intersecting Identities). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Flint, April. Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership, 2012, Clemson University

Intramural activities are conducted on virtually every college campus throughout the United States, but there is a debate as to the role of intramurals in the overall development of the student (Rothwell & Theodore, 2006). Specifically for females, not every sport is offered for participation at youth or higher levels, but intramural sports is one arena where they have the chance to learn the sport rules and referee the game. This study aims to create a base of knowledge on the experiences of female college students who work on campus as intramural sports officials. The purpose of the study is to understand how working as an intramural sports official contributes to the developmental growth of female college students and discover new methods of support and direction for this population. The researcher conducted a qualitative study utilizing constructivist grounded theory methodology to answer the primary research questions: what is the meaning of the relationship between identity development and sports officiating for female college student intramural sports officials in a higher education setting? To become more specific, the researcher explored two secondary research questions: * How do female college student intramural sports officials filter societal messages on gender roles in sport? * How does their personal view of women affect their identity development as a female college student intramural sports official? Chickering's (1979) identity development theory served as the theoretical framework to develop 21 initial interview questions. Eleven (11) female college student intramural sports officials served as the sample population (n=11); they were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview process. Additionally, on the current Director of Intramural sports who worked closely with the participants was interviewed. The researcher examined additional data sources such as observations of participants while officiating, documents from the pilot study, various definitions of student success based on information gathered from several Student Affairs websites, and information regarding intramural sports officiating on college campuses to triangulate data. Data were analyzed utilizing Strauss and Corbin's (1990; 1998) methods of microanalysis, open coding, axial coding, and selective coding procedures. Field notes and memos were maintained by the researcher providing support to data analysis and allowing the researcher to identify and express emerging ideas, categories, and themes. A diagram was formed by the researcher to provide information on specific skills developed by female college student intramural sports officials that led to the definitive answer to the primary research question: student success. The researcher also created a visual diagram of the interaction among the four emergent themes that explained the relationship between identity development and intramural sports officiating: external influences, internal perceptions, intersecting… Advisors/Committee Members: Satterfield, James, Barcelona , Robert, Cawthon , Tony, Warner , Cheryl.

Subjects/Keywords: Campus Recreation; Constructivist Grounded Theory; Female; Intersecting Identities; Intramurals; Sports Official; Educational Leadership

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Flint, A. (2012). Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1033

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Flint, April. “Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed October 01, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1033.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Flint, April. “Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory.” 2012. Web. 01 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Flint A. Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 01]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1033.

Council of Science Editors:

Flint A. Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2012. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1033

2. Michikyan, Minas. Who are you?: Exploring Identity Content Among Young Adults from Diverse Backgrounds Across Contexts Using a Mixed-Methods Approach.

Degree: Education, 2019, UCLA

As our society becomes ever more diverse, so too does the task of finding answers to the fundamental question of identity— “Who am I?” A general tendency of developmental psychologists working with young people from diverse backgrounds is to emphasize ethnic identity and racial identity over other domains of identities. Yet, young people today define and express their identities in diverse and complex ways, beyond ethnicity and race. Developmental psychologists, therefore, are tasked to integrate multiple approaches to study the identity development of the “whole person.” This dissertation, therefore, adopted a “whole person” approach and an ecological perspective to address two research questions: (1) How important do young adults from diverse backgrounds consider their identities across various contexts? and (2) How do young adults from diverse backgrounds express the identities they consider important across various contexts? The Multidimensional-Identities-Qualitatative-Quantitative-Questionnaire (MiQQ) was administered to a diverse sample of 220 young adults (M age = 23) to collect information about their identities and experiences across various contexts and to assess the importance of these identities. Findings indicated that young adults from diverse backgrounds may consider an array of identities meaningful and important when defining themselves across contexts. Moreover, the relative importance of these identities also varied across contexts. Findings also demonstrated that young adults from diverse backgrounds may express their identities in ways to communicate to others their growing sense of maturity/autonomy, relatedness/belongingness, efficacy, self-esteem, and social responsibility. They may also express their identities to honor and empower the self and others, as well as to conform to and resist social norms and standards. Taken together, these findings highlighted the significance of adopting a “whole person” approach and an ecological perspective to understand the unique as well as the shared identity experiences of young adults from diverse backgrounds. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Subjects/Keywords: Educational psychology; diverse young adults; early/emerging adulthood; identity development; intersecting identities; mixed-methods; multiple identities

…22 Phase I: Identifying the Multiple and Intersecting Identities… …in online contexts: Capturing multiple and intersecting identities using qualitative… …Enactment of multiple and intersecting identities online among a group of immigrant-origin women… …this distinction, in this paper, I opted to use a general term, intersecting identities, as… …66 Phase III: Documenting the Expressions of Important Identities… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Michikyan, M. (2019). Who are you?: Exploring Identity Content Among Young Adults from Diverse Backgrounds Across Contexts Using a Mixed-Methods Approach. (Thesis). UCLA. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/94k13379

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Michikyan, Minas. “Who are you?: Exploring Identity Content Among Young Adults from Diverse Backgrounds Across Contexts Using a Mixed-Methods Approach.” 2019. Thesis, UCLA. Accessed October 01, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/94k13379.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Michikyan, Minas. “Who are you?: Exploring Identity Content Among Young Adults from Diverse Backgrounds Across Contexts Using a Mixed-Methods Approach.” 2019. Web. 01 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Michikyan M. Who are you?: Exploring Identity Content Among Young Adults from Diverse Backgrounds Across Contexts Using a Mixed-Methods Approach. [Internet] [Thesis]. UCLA; 2019. [cited 2020 Oct 01]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/94k13379.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Michikyan M. Who are you?: Exploring Identity Content Among Young Adults from Diverse Backgrounds Across Contexts Using a Mixed-Methods Approach. [Thesis]. UCLA; 2019. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/94k13379

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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