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You searched for subject:(Interrole Conflict). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Wayne State University

1. Stoddart, Sarah Renee. Work-Health Conflict: Scale Development For Workers Managing A Chronic Illness.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2014, Wayne State University

ABSTRACT WORK-HEALTH CONFLICT: SCALE DEVELOPMENT FOR WORKERS MANAGING A CHRONIC ILLNESS by SARAH STODDART Advisor: Dr. Alyssa K. McGonagle Major: Psychology (Industrial and Organizational) Degree: Master of Arts The current study developed a Work Health Conflict (WHC) scale to measure conflict experienced by workers who are managing a chronic health condition and continuing to work. It is estimated that 72 million working age adults are also managing a chronic illness. In order to develop the scale 4 studies were conducted using two samples of workers that are currently working with an illness. The first study employed an open-ended survey in order to examine the real life conflict experiences of workers with chronic illness. Results of this study were used to confirm the proposed sub-dimensions of the scales and to confirm that no content was missing before generating items for the scale. The second study used a Q-sort method in order to examine the scale items before collecting quantitative data to examine the factor structure of the scale. In the third study items were deleted from the scale and the WHC yielded an acceptable model fit. Additionally, the WHC demonstrated both convergent and discriminant validity. The WHC also demonstrated incremental validity over WFC and FWC after controlling for illness severity and negative affect with life-related burnout, work-related burnout and withdrawal. Interestingly, in the current study no relationship was observed between the WHC scale and job or life satisfaction. Advisors/Committee Members: Alyssa McGonagle.

Subjects/Keywords: Chronic Illness; Interrole Conflict; Scale Development; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stoddart, S. R. (2014). Work-Health Conflict: Scale Development For Workers Managing A Chronic Illness. (Masters Thesis). Wayne State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_theses/356

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stoddart, Sarah Renee. “Work-Health Conflict: Scale Development For Workers Managing A Chronic Illness.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Wayne State University. Accessed April 22, 2019. https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_theses/356.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stoddart, Sarah Renee. “Work-Health Conflict: Scale Development For Workers Managing A Chronic Illness.” 2014. Web. 22 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Stoddart SR. Work-Health Conflict: Scale Development For Workers Managing A Chronic Illness. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Wayne State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Apr 22]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_theses/356.

Council of Science Editors:

Stoddart SR. Work-Health Conflict: Scale Development For Workers Managing A Chronic Illness. [Masters Thesis]. Wayne State University; 2014. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_theses/356


California State University – San Bernardino

2. Torres, Mireya. COPING WITH INTERROLE CONFLICT: A MIXED-METHOD STUDY OF STUDENTS IN A MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM.

Degree: MSW, School of Social Work, 2018, California State University – San Bernardino

The purpose of this research study was to assess how social work students cope with interrole conflict. This study attempted to capture the depth and breadth of this issue by adopting a mixed-method research design. The quantitative aspect to the study involved the assessment of coping mechanisms among participants with different levels of interrole conflict. For the qualitative portion of the study, the participants were asked to identify their ways of dealing with interrole conflict. All participants in this research were graduate students from a master’s of social work program in a large, Hispanic-serving institution in Southern California. A non-parametric technique, the Kruskal-Wallis H Test, was used to analyze the quantitative part of the research, while thematic analysis was applied to the qualitative piece of reported information. The Kruskal-Wallis H Test results indicated no statistically significant difference in coping mechanisms among students dealing with different levels of interrole conflict. Meanwhile, results from thematic analysis of the data revealed ten positive coping mechanisms and five negative coping approaches. Organization, social support, self-care, orientation toward solution, spirituality/religiosity, physical activity, and therapy were the most salient ways participants cope with interrole conflict. From a negative coping perspective, as many as 18 participants reported negative coping methods, including unresponsiveness, over/under sleeping, eating, and drinking. Implications for family, workplace, and social work were discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Rigaud Joseph.

Subjects/Keywords: INTERROLE CONFLICT; SOCIAL WORK; THEMATIC ANAZLYSIS; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Social Work

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APA (6th Edition):

Torres, M. (2018). COPING WITH INTERROLE CONFLICT: A MIXED-METHOD STUDY OF STUDENTS IN A MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM. (Thesis). California State University – San Bernardino. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/etd/704

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Torres, Mireya. “COPING WITH INTERROLE CONFLICT: A MIXED-METHOD STUDY OF STUDENTS IN A MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM.” 2018. Thesis, California State University – San Bernardino. Accessed April 22, 2019. http://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/etd/704.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Torres, Mireya. “COPING WITH INTERROLE CONFLICT: A MIXED-METHOD STUDY OF STUDENTS IN A MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM.” 2018. Web. 22 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Torres M. COPING WITH INTERROLE CONFLICT: A MIXED-METHOD STUDY OF STUDENTS IN A MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM. [Internet] [Thesis]. California State University – San Bernardino; 2018. [cited 2019 Apr 22]. Available from: http://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/etd/704.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Torres M. COPING WITH INTERROLE CONFLICT: A MIXED-METHOD STUDY OF STUDENTS IN A MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM. [Thesis]. California State University – San Bernardino; 2018. Available from: http://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/etd/704

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Wayne State University

3. Wynne, Kevin Thomas. Exploring Crossover Effects Among Working Spouses Through The Lens Of Social Cognitive Theory: Soc And Work-Family Conflict.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2016, Wayne State University

Managing competing demands from multiple life domains poses a significant challenge for today's workforce. In particular, employees who also have an active role at home often experience work-family conflict (WFC), which is associated with a number of negative outcomes. Research has shown that the selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) set of coping strategies includes behaviors that tend to reduce WFC. However, it remains unknown how working spouses' use of these effective strategies "crossover" to influence the partner’s outcomes. Do individuals' use of SOC coping strategies reduce their spouse's experience of WFC? Using an emergent data analytic method—the actor-partner interdependence model using structural equation modeling—the present dissertation explored the effect of each spouse’s SOC on his/her own WFC (actor effects) while controlling for the partner effect, as well as the effect of each spouse’s SOC on the other spouse’s WFC (partner effects) while controlling for the actor effect. Results found good model fit for the proposed model and small but significant actor and partner effects. Importantly, partner effects represent effects above and beyond actor effects, suggesting the incremental validity of spouses’ SOC in predicting partner WFC. Practical implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed further. Advisors/Committee Members: Boris Baltes.

Subjects/Keywords: Coping strategies; Dyad; Interrole conflict; Selection; optimization; and compensation; SOC; Work-family conflict; Business Administration, Management, and Operations; Organizational Behavior and Theory; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wynne, K. T. (2016). Exploring Crossover Effects Among Working Spouses Through The Lens Of Social Cognitive Theory: Soc And Work-Family Conflict. (Doctoral Dissertation). Wayne State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1606

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wynne, Kevin Thomas. “Exploring Crossover Effects Among Working Spouses Through The Lens Of Social Cognitive Theory: Soc And Work-Family Conflict.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Wayne State University. Accessed April 22, 2019. https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1606.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wynne, Kevin Thomas. “Exploring Crossover Effects Among Working Spouses Through The Lens Of Social Cognitive Theory: Soc And Work-Family Conflict.” 2016. Web. 22 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Wynne KT. Exploring Crossover Effects Among Working Spouses Through The Lens Of Social Cognitive Theory: Soc And Work-Family Conflict. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Wayne State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Apr 22]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1606.

Council of Science Editors:

Wynne KT. Exploring Crossover Effects Among Working Spouses Through The Lens Of Social Cognitive Theory: Soc And Work-Family Conflict. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Wayne State University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1606

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