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You searched for subject:(Interpreting sites). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Washington

1. Melnik, Zachary Harrison. The Carcass and The Balloon: Reinterpreting the Hanford Landscape through Mapping and Measure.

Degree: 2019, University of Washington

As a unique geography of irradiated space, the Hanford Reach in Washington State has been measured in every way conceived by modern science and bureaucracy. This former military site has been mapped in a variety of ways, in maps that tend to over specify and oversimplify at the same time, placing its entangled histories and futures of this landscape at odds with one another. The interpretation of the site currently relies on the articulation of the boundaries between things, contaminated and uncontaminated, natural and man-made, and future and past. This thesis argues for a more nuanced interpretation of the site employing mapping as a generative vehicle for designing and communicating within this context. The proposed design of architectural interventions, the Carcass and the Balloon, relies on the extraction of unseen spatial, material and formal measures of the site. Advisors/Committee Members: Mohler, Rick (advisor), Jones, Susan (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Hanford; Interpreting sites; Mapping; Relaiming Landscapes; Architecture; Landscape architecture; Architecture

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APA (6th Edition):

Melnik, Z. H. (2019). The Carcass and The Balloon: Reinterpreting the Hanford Landscape through Mapping and Measure. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43221

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Melnik, Zachary Harrison. “The Carcass and The Balloon: Reinterpreting the Hanford Landscape through Mapping and Measure.” 2019. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed March 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43221.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Melnik, Zachary Harrison. “The Carcass and The Balloon: Reinterpreting the Hanford Landscape through Mapping and Measure.” 2019. Web. 21 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Melnik ZH. The Carcass and The Balloon: Reinterpreting the Hanford Landscape through Mapping and Measure. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2019 Mar 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43221.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Melnik ZH. The Carcass and The Balloon: Reinterpreting the Hanford Landscape through Mapping and Measure. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43221

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Louisiana State University

2. Rose, Julia Anne. Rethinking representations of slave life a historical plantation museums: towards a commemorative museum pedagogy.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2006, Louisiana State University

Historical plantation museums have been criticized for biased interpretation practices that marginalize the historical presence of enslaved African Americans. This is a curriculum question that is relevant to historical museums that are wrestling with impacting social change and developing equitable practices to serve increasingly broad and diverse audiences. I conducted an action research study with five museum workers at Magnolia Mound Plantation (MMP) in south Louisiana to better understand the limits and possibilities of expanding slave life representations at this museum. I implemented the study using action research and archival research. Action research involved ethnographic methodologies including tour observations, interviews, focus group meetings, and feedback from outside reviewers. The archival research generated a report documenting this site’s enslaved community from 1786-1830. Museum workers demonstrated that they were engaged in remembrance learning, a kind of learning to live with loss, when they were faced with revising the museum’s traditional planter-focused tour to an integrated tour that elevated the historical presence of the enslaved community. Looking through an educational psychoanalytic lens, I found that the newly introduced slave life histories disrupted museum workers’ understandings of MMP’s history, which incited feelings of loss for the iconic meanings of the historical site and for museum workers’ personal attachments to French Louisiana plantation heritage. Museum workers used expressions of mourning and melancholia to describe their engagement with the slave life histories.

Subjects/Keywords: museum education; interpreting slavery; Louisiana history; museum learning; remembrance; historical sites

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rose, J. A. (2006). Rethinking representations of slave life a historical plantation museums: towards a commemorative museum pedagogy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Louisiana State University. Retrieved from etd-06292006-183004 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/1040

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rose, Julia Anne. “Rethinking representations of slave life a historical plantation museums: towards a commemorative museum pedagogy.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Louisiana State University. Accessed March 21, 2019. etd-06292006-183004 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/1040.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rose, Julia Anne. “Rethinking representations of slave life a historical plantation museums: towards a commemorative museum pedagogy.” 2006. Web. 21 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Rose JA. Rethinking representations of slave life a historical plantation museums: towards a commemorative museum pedagogy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2006. [cited 2019 Mar 21]. Available from: etd-06292006-183004 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/1040.

Council of Science Editors:

Rose JA. Rethinking representations of slave life a historical plantation museums: towards a commemorative museum pedagogy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2006. Available from: etd-06292006-183004 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/1040

3. Andonian, Raffi Edward. Nuclear history: debating the meanings of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

Degree: MHP, Historic Preservation, 2013, University of Georgia

In September 2012, the decade-long effort to create the Manhattan Project National Historical Park culminated with the failure of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park Act in the 112th Congress of the United States. Throughout that year, the local, national, and international public debate about this potential national park remained contested and controversial, because the Manhattan Project created the world’s first nuclear weapons, which were used by the United States in 1945 on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the Second World War. Many layers of nuclear legacies, stemming from 1945 through the present day, pervade the public’s historical memory of the Manhattan Project. Thus, this public debate raised questions about the roles of historic preservation, national parks, and historical interpretation. The 113th Congress might reconsider and vote again about the establishment the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, and this time Congress must recognize the historic significance of the Manhattan Project and allow for its preservation by approving the measure. Advisors/Committee Members: Eric MacDonald.

Subjects/Keywords: history; historic preservation; Alois Riegl; James Marston Fitch; John Tunbridge; Gregory Ashworth; historical interpretation; Freeman Tilden; historical memory; pubic history; public memory; contested history; controversial history; difficult history; painful history; debated history; nuclear; nuclear history; atomic; atomic history; nuclear legacy; energy history; energy politics; energy policy; nuclear politics; nuclear energy; nuclear power; bomb; the bomb; uranium; plutonium; history of science; Second World War; World War II; World War 2; Cold War; Cold War history; Cold War memory; Cold War sites; monuments; historic sites; historic landscapes; cultural landscapes; national parks; national monuments; twentieth century; United State Congress; U.S. Congress; House of Representatives; Dennis Kucinich; Doc Hastings; U.S. Senate; Jeff Bingaman; 112th Congress; 113th Congress; Manhattan Project National Historical Park Act; legislative history; political history; Los Alamos; Oak Ridge; Hanford; Trinity Site; Hiroshima; Nagasaki; Japan; New Mexico; J. Robert Oppenheimer; Oppenheimer; Manhattan Project; National Park Service; Horace Albright; Department of Energy; Manhattan Project National Historical Park; Atomic Heritage Foundation; Cynthia Kelly; Cindy Kelly; Los Alamos Historical Society; Heather McClenahan; Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ellen McGehee; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; National Historic Landmarks; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory National Historic Landmark District; Fuller Lodge; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory NHL District; National Register of Historic Places; Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places; William Murtagh; Smithsonian Institution; National Air and Space Museum; Enola Gay; David Lowenthal; Edward Linenthal; Back of the Big House; John Michael Vlach; Library of Congress; framing nuclear history; understanding the power of nuclear history; creating nuclear history; remembering nuclear history; interpreting nuclear history; advocating nuclear history

…locations to interpreting existing United States Department of Energy sites: Oak Ridge, Tennessee… …should a collection of historic sites with so many conflicting narratives be preserved? Within… …components that are increasingly important to the field of historic preservation as Cold War sites… …importance and meaning of tangible historic sites is Freeman Tilden. Tilden, whose professional… …studying interpretation at National Park Service sites for three decades beginning in 1951 that… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Andonian, R. E. (2013). Nuclear history: debating the meanings of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. (Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/andonian_raffi_e_201312_mhp

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Andonian, Raffi Edward. “Nuclear history: debating the meanings of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park.” 2013. Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed March 21, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/andonian_raffi_e_201312_mhp.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Andonian, Raffi Edward. “Nuclear history: debating the meanings of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park.” 2013. Web. 21 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Andonian RE. Nuclear history: debating the meanings of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 21]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/andonian_raffi_e_201312_mhp.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Andonian RE. Nuclear history: debating the meanings of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2013. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/andonian_raffi_e_201312_mhp

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.