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You searched for subject:(Intercountry adoption Guatemala). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Central Connecticut State University

1. Harlow, Lisa Anne, 1979-. Intercountry adoption after the Hague : is the Convention an effective way to regulate international adoptions? : a study of intercountry adoption between Guatemala and the United States.

Degree: Department of History, 2011, Central Connecticut State University

Over the last 50 years, the United States has seen a significant increase in the number of children entering its borders annually through intercountry adoption. Accepting thousands of more children than any other nation, the United States is the world's top receiving country. Throughout the history of intercountry adoption, however, the practice has been riddled with controversy and problems, which stem from concerns over who should be entrusted with defining and pursuing children's "best interests," as well as from corrupt practices that have taken root as intercountry adoption has shifted from altruistically meeting the needs of children to also serving the needs of adults wishing to adopt healthy, young infants. The practice, at times, has taken on a market-like appearance, with the profits of intermediaries taking precedent over the needs of children. Recognizing the negative aspects of intercountry adoption, the international community has attempted to regulate the practice. The 1993 Hague Convention of Protection of Children and Co-Operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption marks the international community's most recent effort to reform adoption practices. The Hague aims to end corruption and ensure just adoptions in best interests of the children they intend to serve. The effectiveness of the Hague, however, is yet to be determined. The aim of this study is to place the Hague Convention within the context of the intercountry adoption relationship between Guatemala and the United States to analyze the Hague's effectiveness. Stories of corruption mired the pre-Hague adoption system between the two nations, making stronger regulation a necessity, and as of 2008 both nations have implemented the Hague to improve the system. Ratification, however, has nearly halted adoptions between the two nations altogether and has not facilitated just adoptions as it intends to. The United States has recently opted out of an invitation to participate in a pilot, Hague-complaint system with Guatemala, perhaps prioritizing the demands of its nationals over its commitment to the Hague Convention's standards. The Hague Convention can have a significant impact on adoptions of children to the United States only if the nation is committed to the ideals of the Hague and is willing to back its diplomatic support of just adoptions with concrete practices that will enable to Convention to effectively achieve its goals. The context of the Guatemala-United States intercountry adoption relationship provides a case study in which to analyze the need for the Hague Convention, implementation of it, and its effectiveness in ending adoption corruption and facilitating just adoptions. Advisors/Committee Members: ;, Mahony, Mary Ann.

Subjects/Keywords: Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (1993); Intercountry adoption  – Law and legislation; Intercountry adoption  – United States; Intercountry adoption  – Guatemala

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harlow, Lisa Anne, 1. (2011). Intercountry adoption after the Hague : is the Convention an effective way to regulate international adoptions? : a study of intercountry adoption between Guatemala and the United States. (Thesis). Central Connecticut State University. Retrieved from http://content.library.ccsu.edu/u?/ccsutheses,1738

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harlow, Lisa Anne, 1979-. “Intercountry adoption after the Hague : is the Convention an effective way to regulate international adoptions? : a study of intercountry adoption between Guatemala and the United States.” 2011. Thesis, Central Connecticut State University. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://content.library.ccsu.edu/u?/ccsutheses,1738.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harlow, Lisa Anne, 1979-. “Intercountry adoption after the Hague : is the Convention an effective way to regulate international adoptions? : a study of intercountry adoption between Guatemala and the United States.” 2011. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Harlow, Lisa Anne 1. Intercountry adoption after the Hague : is the Convention an effective way to regulate international adoptions? : a study of intercountry adoption between Guatemala and the United States. [Internet] [Thesis]. Central Connecticut State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://content.library.ccsu.edu/u?/ccsutheses,1738.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harlow, Lisa Anne 1. Intercountry adoption after the Hague : is the Convention an effective way to regulate international adoptions? : a study of intercountry adoption between Guatemala and the United States. [Thesis]. Central Connecticut State University; 2011. Available from: http://content.library.ccsu.edu/u?/ccsutheses,1738

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Commonwealth University

2. Monico, Carmen. IMPLICATIONS OF CHILD ABDUCTION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CHILD WELFARE SYSTEMS: A CONSTRUCTIVIST INQUIRY OF THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF GUATEMALAN MOTHERS PUBLICALLY REPORTING CHILD ABDUCTION FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION.

Degree: PhD, Social Work, 2013, Virginia Commonwealth University

The Hague Convention on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption was agreed upon in 1993 at the Hague Conference on Private International Law to address growing allegations of abduction, sale, and trafficking of children around the world. The Hague Convention guides countries to attend to the “best interest of the child” in making decisions on intercountry adoptions, and to apply the “principle of subsidiarity,” which calls for the consideration of family and kinship placement and national adoption prior to the consideration of intercountry adoption. This dissertation research focused on the experience of Guatemalan mothers reporting the abduction of their children for intercountry adoption. It examines implications for human rights and the child welfare system. In countries where child abduction allegations have been widespread, illegal adoption has been found to be a common practice and is the result of international child trafficking. Large financial gains are implicated in this type of organized crime, which appears to promote baby selling. In countries enacting the Hague Convention, the continuation of these allegations points to the governments’ inability to prosecute and penalize those responsible. Illegal adoptions pose significant threats to the ethical standards set by the Central Authorities established to implement the Hague Convention. Child abduction has been found to complicate and delay the determination of adoptability, and to undermine due process for legitimate intercountry adoptions. Child abduction has profound effects on grieving mothers and their families after the loss of their children with no resolution in sight. This constructivist research documents the story of three Guatemalan women who reported to public authorities the separate and unrelated abduction of their respective daughters in 2006. The case study report is a “thick description” of the lived experience of these mothers before, during, and after the child theft. The narration comprises an interpretation of their experience, or the participants’ meaning-making of such experience. Based on the mothers’ accounts, their victimization at the hands of child traffickers was followed by victimization by public authorities, who did not exercise due diligence in these child abduction cases. After these survivors exhausted their individual searches for their children, they approached the Fundación Sobrevivientes, who provided them with legal representation and psychosocial support. Together with other mothers, these women publicly advocated for their rights and the rights of their children. Their collective response to this form of violence was critical to accessing the case files in which they identified their abducted children. By engaging in individual legal claims, the participating mothers have sought nullification of each intercountry adoption and the prosecution of those involved in the corresponding illegal and corrupt activities. To conduct this constructivist inquiry, the researcher spent a… Advisors/Committee Members: Humberto Fabelo.

Subjects/Keywords: child abduction; Intercountry adoption; human rights; child welfare; Guatemala; Constructivism; Qualitative; Birth Parents; Human Trafficking; Social Work; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Social Work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Monico, C. (2013). IMPLICATIONS OF CHILD ABDUCTION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CHILD WELFARE SYSTEMS: A CONSTRUCTIVIST INQUIRY OF THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF GUATEMALAN MOTHERS PUBLICALLY REPORTING CHILD ABDUCTION FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3137

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Monico, Carmen. “IMPLICATIONS OF CHILD ABDUCTION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CHILD WELFARE SYSTEMS: A CONSTRUCTIVIST INQUIRY OF THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF GUATEMALAN MOTHERS PUBLICALLY REPORTING CHILD ABDUCTION FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed October 22, 2019. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3137.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Monico, Carmen. “IMPLICATIONS OF CHILD ABDUCTION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CHILD WELFARE SYSTEMS: A CONSTRUCTIVIST INQUIRY OF THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF GUATEMALAN MOTHERS PUBLICALLY REPORTING CHILD ABDUCTION FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION.” 2013. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Monico C. IMPLICATIONS OF CHILD ABDUCTION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CHILD WELFARE SYSTEMS: A CONSTRUCTIVIST INQUIRY OF THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF GUATEMALAN MOTHERS PUBLICALLY REPORTING CHILD ABDUCTION FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3137.

Council of Science Editors:

Monico C. IMPLICATIONS OF CHILD ABDUCTION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND CHILD WELFARE SYSTEMS: A CONSTRUCTIVIST INQUIRY OF THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF GUATEMALAN MOTHERS PUBLICALLY REPORTING CHILD ABDUCTION FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2013. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3137

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