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You searched for subject:(Informal elite). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet

1. Bangwanubusa, Theogene. Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda.

Degree: 2009, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet

This doctoral dissertation is concerned with identifying factors that are important in explaining popular support for genocidal violence in Rwanda. It focuses on former communes, Giti and Murambi, to investigate why Giti successfully resisted the genocidal violence, while Murambi fell prey to large-scale violence. It addresses the question of why such a phenomenon could occur, given that Giti and Murambi were allegedly homogenous on cultural and socio-economic grounds. The theoretical standpoint, according to which there is interplay between the top leaders, middle-range leaders and the grassroots leadership, to bring about social change, was empirically supported. Moreover, there is strong recognition that the middle-range level of leadership remains the most important catalyst for engaging the common citizenry in both peaceful and violent processes. The empirical findings establish that both the genocide, and the absence of genocidal violence, were attributable to actions of the then burgomasters (local leaders). In this respect, the study highlights a historical aspect of the non-violence and violence, respectively, in Giti and Murambi, identified to be the result of alternatively efficient and inefficient leadership. Efficiency and inefficiency were understood as an indication of a gap between the central and the local institutions that also depended upon how strong was the political network of the top-level of leadership. Therefore, the response to genocidal violence was strongly linked to the strength of the political network. Referring to a weak political network, the case of Giti showed that the top-down style of command does not necessarily translate the will of the elite and, hence, of the common citizenry under their leadership. In this respect, the study highlights the crucial role that the informal elite played, particularly in Giti, to translate this will. The pattern of popular behavior in Giti led to the conclusion that vertical powers between the intermediate leaders and the common citizenry are a necessary condition for popular support, but are not of themselves sufficient. To expect popular support, the empirical findings established, grassroots thinking is a strong base from which ordinary people might transform into violent or non-violent agents. Grassroots thinking drove the perceptions and a set of shared beliefs about the ‘other’ until it led to the dichotomy of identity into ‘us’ and ‘them’ (or polarized ethnic relations) in Murambi, and to the mixed ethnic relations in Giti. As a result of popular support, the material showed that the middle-range leadership had ascendancy over the common citizenry with which it identified. This was an indication of a meeting point between the middle-range leaders and the common citizenry, whereby a minimum level of shared grassroots thinking drives the interactions in a mutually accepted direction.

Subjects/Keywords: Popular support; Obedience; Genocidal violence; Grassroots thinking; Elite; Informal elite; Social power; Ordinary people; War-displaced people; Immigration; Social taboo; Social pact; Mixed ethnic relations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bangwanubusa, T. (2009). Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda. (Thesis). University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bangwanubusa, Theogene. “Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda.” 2009. Thesis, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bangwanubusa, Theogene. “Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda.” 2009. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bangwanubusa T. Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bangwanubusa T. Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda. [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Goel, Koeli. A new India: Contestations of national identity at the crossroads of postcolonial aspirations and globalized imagination.

Degree: PhD, 0279, 2014, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

My dissertation examines contestations of national identity and representation of individual aspirations within a globalized imagination of 21st century India. In analyzing the metaphoric construction of a New India, I look at the unrestrained urbanization that has followed economic liberalization and the political mobilization of marginalized sections of the population, also concomitantly emerging within these new urbanscapes. As they intersect with new media practices, community-building and neoliberal restructuring of the state, enterprise and the individual, the tenor of a national community, previously invested in the narrative of a glorious past emerging from classical Hindu roots seem to be merging with myriad flows of globalization, transforming the social landscape of the postcolonial nation in significant ways. In studying this, my study uses archival data and ethnographic research to adopt a critical approach to communication and cultural studies with a focus on exploring how the country’s national imagination has been formed within the coordinates of the original Nehruvian trope of the nation as “a new star… of freedom in the East” and the newest construction of “India rising,” especially as it develops with relation to conditions of globalization. It examines how globalization has reconstituted the image of the nation, the national community and national prosperity, as well as development and progress – national, regional and individual – in the minds of the ordinary citizen. Advisors/Committee Members: McCarthy, Cameron R. (advisor), Valdivia, Angharad N. (Committee Chair), McCarthy, Cameron R. (committee member), Denzin, Norman K. (committee member), Dhillon, Pradeep A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: South-Asian studies; cultural studies; communication; media studies; globalization; national identity; national community; national imagination; new media; Museums; urban history; domestic laborer; informal sector; elite; subaltern; resistance; India

…which empowers an increasingly mobile, networked and cosmopolitan “elite” to operate and… …not only on the lives of the educated, upwardly mobile urban elite but also on the lives and… …aspirations of a political elite, the mobilization of a relatively sophisticated civil society, the… …elite thus seemingly originates in the masses but in an obverse way might actually be… …by a political elite increasingly destabilized on one side by unimpeded erosions of State… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goel, K. (2014). A new India: Contestations of national identity at the crossroads of postcolonial aspirations and globalized imagination. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49623

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goel, Koeli. “A new India: Contestations of national identity at the crossroads of postcolonial aspirations and globalized imagination.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49623.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goel, Koeli. “A new India: Contestations of national identity at the crossroads of postcolonial aspirations and globalized imagination.” 2014. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Goel K. A new India: Contestations of national identity at the crossroads of postcolonial aspirations and globalized imagination. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49623.

Council of Science Editors:

Goel K. A new India: Contestations of national identity at the crossroads of postcolonial aspirations and globalized imagination. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49623

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