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1. Ige, Kehinde Davies. Poverty attribution and reaction to income inequality in Nigeria : the case of Badia community in Lagos.

Degree: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, 2011, University of Fort Hare

This study was about the reaction of disadvantaged groups and persons to inequality and deprivation. Set in Badia, a low income community in Lagos, Nigeria, it investigates the main effects of community members’ attributions of causes of poverty in motivating or impeding their reaction to inequality. Relative Deprivation (RD) theory proposed that dissatisfaction with social outcomes depend on subjective feelings rather than objective criteria. However scholars found empirical difficulties in predicting collective action on the basis of RD. Resource Mobilization proponents argued on the contrary that feelings are not salient within the framework of action. The infusion of Social Identity Theory (SIT) into RD research however resolved the paradox of action with SIT’s argument that action was contingent upon the perception of permeability and legitimacy of inter-group structures. However, despite successes of SIT, scholars found that it was unable to predict the type of actions group members will take in response to injustice and the nature of possible actions. Propositions of RD and SIT were therefore suitable for integration into the proposition of Taylor & McKirnan’s (1984) Five Stage Model (FSM) of inter-group relations that reactions to RD feelings were predicated upon the dynamics of the social philosophy guiding stratification. Using an integrated RD, SIT and FSM framework, this study shows how disadvantaged group members’ responses to deprivation proceeded as predicted by the FSM from mutual acceptance to collective action mediated by their perception of causes of poverty. This complements the trend in the literature on reaction to inequality and it's almost ii exclusive focus on instrumental and affective concerns while neglecting the role of consensually shared beliefs in motivating or impeding action and willingness to act in response to injustice. The study hypothesized that the pattern of causal attributions of poverty of respondents will shape their ‘predisposition to act’ and the type of action they would engage in. The main hypothesis of the study therefore was that poverty attribution mediates the relationship between ‘feelings of injustice’ and ‘reaction to inequality’. For instance where respondents attribute poverty to individual or fatalistic factors they will adopt individual action whereas where attributions are structural, responses will be collective, where feelings of injustice were present. A survey was conducted using a five-level Likert scale to decipher respondents’ perceptions of feelings of injustice, their causal attribution of poverty, their levels of willingness to embark on collective action and actions taken in the preceding year. In the first stage of analysis, responses (n = 383) were reduced using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to determine how questionnaire items contributed to variables under consideration. Subsequently, variables extracted were correlated and regressed. While bivariate correlation was used to test simple relationships between variables, a stepwise… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. F.H. Nekhwevha.

Subjects/Keywords: Income distribution – Nigeria; Poverty – Nigeria

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ige, K. D. (2011). Poverty attribution and reaction to income inequality in Nigeria : the case of Badia community in Lagos. (Thesis). University of Fort Hare. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10353/329

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ige, Kehinde Davies. “Poverty attribution and reaction to income inequality in Nigeria : the case of Badia community in Lagos.” 2011. Thesis, University of Fort Hare. Accessed March 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10353/329.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ige, Kehinde Davies. “Poverty attribution and reaction to income inequality in Nigeria : the case of Badia community in Lagos.” 2011. Web. 21 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Ige KD. Poverty attribution and reaction to income inequality in Nigeria : the case of Badia community in Lagos. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2011. [cited 2019 Mar 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10353/329.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ige KD. Poverty attribution and reaction to income inequality in Nigeria : the case of Badia community in Lagos. [Thesis]. University of Fort Hare; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10353/329

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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