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You searched for subject:(Imperial image). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. 黄建豪; WONG KIAN HOE CHARLES. 合作,争论与协商:明代⼠⼈对帝皇军事思维的重建 = COLLABORATION, CONTENTION AND NEGOTIATION: THE MILITARY ETHOS OF THE MING EMPERORS AND ITS RECONSTRUCTION BY THE LITERATI.

Degree: 2014, National University of Singapore

Subjects/Keywords: Martial; ethos; imperial; literati; writings; image

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

CHARLES, . W. K. H. (2014). 合作,争论与协商:明代⼠⼈对帝皇军事思维的重建 = COLLABORATION, CONTENTION AND NEGOTIATION: THE MILITARY ETHOS OF THE MING EMPERORS AND ITS RECONSTRUCTION BY THE LITERATI. (Thesis). National University of Singapore. Retrieved from http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/119034

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

CHARLES, 黄建豪; WONG KIAN HOE. “合作,争论与协商:明代⼠⼈对帝皇军事思维的重建 = COLLABORATION, CONTENTION AND NEGOTIATION: THE MILITARY ETHOS OF THE MING EMPERORS AND ITS RECONSTRUCTION BY THE LITERATI.” 2014. Thesis, National University of Singapore. Accessed September 22, 2020. http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/119034.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

CHARLES, 黄建豪; WONG KIAN HOE. “合作,争论与协商:明代⼠⼈对帝皇军事思维的重建 = COLLABORATION, CONTENTION AND NEGOTIATION: THE MILITARY ETHOS OF THE MING EMPERORS AND ITS RECONSTRUCTION BY THE LITERATI.” 2014. Web. 22 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

CHARLES WKH. 合作,争论与协商:明代⼠⼈对帝皇军事思维的重建 = COLLABORATION, CONTENTION AND NEGOTIATION: THE MILITARY ETHOS OF THE MING EMPERORS AND ITS RECONSTRUCTION BY THE LITERATI. [Internet] [Thesis]. National University of Singapore; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 22]. Available from: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/119034.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

CHARLES WKH. 合作,争论与协商:明代⼠⼈对帝皇军事思维的重建 = COLLABORATION, CONTENTION AND NEGOTIATION: THE MILITARY ETHOS OF THE MING EMPERORS AND ITS RECONSTRUCTION BY THE LITERATI. [Thesis]. National University of Singapore; 2014. Available from: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/119034

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Michigan

2. Herbst, Matthew Thomas. The medieval art of spin: Constructing the imperial image of control in ninth-century Byzantium.

Degree: PhD, Social Sciences, 1998, University of Michigan

This study of the art of image-making in ninth-century Byzantium explains how the emperor broadcast the idea that he effectively controlled the empire. It also interprets the significant challenge of monastic opponents to this projection of power. Chapter one examines the ways the emperor regulated the physical movement of people within the empire. The regular movement of officials and ecclesiastics as well as thousands of troops manifested the power of the emperor who sent them. These imperial servants then monitored or directed the movement of others such as peasants, merchants, and foreigners. In addition, imperial ceremonies served as commercials which advertised that all participants and onlookers moved in strict obedience to imperial commands. Chapter two shows how the emperor attempted to regulate words (both oral and written). The emperor expected soldiers, officials, bishops, and the demes to express what he wanted through acclamations, oaths, and other statements which he authorized. Dissent was (as much as possible) silenced. This chapter also examines how the emperor himself used both words and even silence to advertise his control. Chapter three analyzes the manner in which the emperor turned challenges to his advantage by demonstrating his re-assertion of control. He used the ceremonies of trial and punishment to manifest imperial justice, the loyalty of all groups to him, the villainy of opponents, and finally the dramatic re-assertion of imperial control. Through these, challenge was clearly broadcast as in vain and expectations were reiterated. The last chapter focuses on the opposition of particular monks who threatened to undermine this carefully crafted image. They challenged the emperor on the very ground upon which he built the idea of control. They circumvented regulations of movement, they mocked imperial expectations of speech, and they sometimes sought trial and punishment to discredit the emperor and to promote their own cause. As a result, they ideologically challenged the emperor and posed a great threat to the presentation of imperial control. By the end of the century Emperor Basil I successfully maneuvered around monastic opposition and managed to secure both monastic support and the image of control. Advisors/Committee Members: Jr., John V. A. Fine, (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Art; Byzantium; Constructing; Control; Image; Imperial; Medieval; Ninth Century; Spin

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Herbst, M. T. (1998). The medieval art of spin: Constructing the imperial image of control in ninth-century Byzantium. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131224

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Herbst, Matthew Thomas. “The medieval art of spin: Constructing the imperial image of control in ninth-century Byzantium.” 1998. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed September 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131224.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Herbst, Matthew Thomas. “The medieval art of spin: Constructing the imperial image of control in ninth-century Byzantium.” 1998. Web. 22 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Herbst MT. The medieval art of spin: Constructing the imperial image of control in ninth-century Byzantium. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1998. [cited 2020 Sep 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131224.

Council of Science Editors:

Herbst MT. The medieval art of spin: Constructing the imperial image of control in ninth-century Byzantium. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1998. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131224


Kent State University

3. Whitacre, Amanda Joree. Disability and Ability in the Accounts of the Emperor Claudius.

Degree: MA, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies, 2018, Kent State University

This thesis examines the passages in Seneca’s <i>Apocolocyntosis</i>, Suetonius’ <i>Lives of the Caesars</i>, and Dio’s <i>Roman History</i>, which pertain to the Emperor Claudius’ disability. The passages are discussed in terms of how they reflect the Roman perception of disability. This perception equates leadership with physical control of one’s body and hence portrays Claudius as an unsuitable leader. The thesis concludes with portions of a letter which Claudius wrote to the Alexandrians, the contents of which reveal Claudius as a man who commands authority, making him appear as a capable leader despite what his physical differences implied. Advisors/Committee Members: Larson, Jennifer (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Ancient Civilizations; Classical Studies; Families and Family Life; Foreign Language; Gender; Health; Literature; Minority and Ethnic Groups; Social Structure; Latin literature; Claudius; disability; Imperial image; physiognomy; virtues

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Whitacre, A. J. (2018). Disability and Ability in the Accounts of the Emperor Claudius. (Masters Thesis). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1532088905482623

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Whitacre, Amanda Joree. “Disability and Ability in the Accounts of the Emperor Claudius.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Kent State University. Accessed September 22, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1532088905482623.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Whitacre, Amanda Joree. “Disability and Ability in the Accounts of the Emperor Claudius.” 2018. Web. 22 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Whitacre AJ. Disability and Ability in the Accounts of the Emperor Claudius. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kent State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Sep 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1532088905482623.

Council of Science Editors:

Whitacre AJ. Disability and Ability in the Accounts of the Emperor Claudius. [Masters Thesis]. Kent State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1532088905482623

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