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You searched for subject:(Impaired Physicians). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Pethebridge, Andrew. Rehabilitation of the impaired doctor by the New South Wales Medical Board.

Degree: Psychiatry, 2005, University of New South Wales

The New South Wales Medical Board established a Health Programme for the assessment and rehabilitation of doctors whose clinical performance was impaired by alcohol or psychoactive substance use, mental or physical illness. This programme was developed to be individualized to the needs of each registrant.The present study has three aims:1. To describe those doctors who participated in the BoardÂ’s Health Programme.2. To chart the duration of involvement of these doctors through the programme.3. To examine the outcomes associated with this programme. The study is based on the prospective cohort of all 181 impaired doctors who participated in the Health Programme between July 1st 1993 and April 30th 2001. Information on each registrant was collected at the time of the initial assessment and at each review conducted as part of the programme. Additional qualitative data was also collected and supplemented by a file audit conducted in August and September 2001.One hundred and eighty-one doctors were prospectively monitored as part of this study. The largest source of impairment was psychiatric illness (45.3%), 77% of the doctors were male. The average age of the cohort was 41.6 (sd 11.1) years. Impaired doctors were more likely to be working in emergency medicine or psychiatry and be based in a rural area. Of those who had finished their involvement in the programme, successful graduates participated for a mean of 38.2 (sd 22.3) months. In general outcomes of involvement were positive, 64 of 113 (56.6%) of doctors successfully graduated from the programme. One hundred and ten of 168 (65.5%) improved during the period of their involvement and 111 of 126 (88.1%) were working in medicine. Five, 2.8% of the participants died during the period of this study. Measures of registrant insight and support tended to increase during the period of involvement with the Health Programme.Future studies will need to establish evidence for the most appropriate interventions with impaired doctors. This process would be strengthened by the collection of standardized data across intervention programmes, supplemented with functional assessments and the collection of qualitative data.

Subjects/Keywords: Medical Board; Impaired Registrants Program; Health Program; Physicians; Rehabilitation; Medical policy; Doctors; New South Wales; Discipline; Substance use; Alcohol use; Drug use; Mental health; Medical care; Health and hygiene

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pethebridge, A. (2005). Rehabilitation of the impaired doctor by the New South Wales Medical Board. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/22038 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:722/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pethebridge, Andrew. “Rehabilitation of the impaired doctor by the New South Wales Medical Board.” 2005. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/22038 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:722/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pethebridge, Andrew. “Rehabilitation of the impaired doctor by the New South Wales Medical Board.” 2005. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Pethebridge A. Rehabilitation of the impaired doctor by the New South Wales Medical Board. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2005. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/22038 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:722/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Pethebridge A. Rehabilitation of the impaired doctor by the New South Wales Medical Board. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2005. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/22038 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:722/SOURCE01?view=true


University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

2. [No author]. Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of .

Degree: University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

The subspecialty of literature and medicine is significant, not only as a supplement to an education in biomedicine and science, but also as a serious engagement in the pursuit of humane feeling essential in the cultivation of health professionals. I aim to convince the instructors of medicine and health care in Japan that incorporating a program of literature and medicine in their curricula is important to create health professionals endowed with skills of narrative analysis and interpretation, and other essential qualities required in the practitioner-patient relationship, such as empathy, moral imagination, and ethical reflection. In Part I, I outline the emergence and development of literature and medicine in the United States and initiate Japanese faculty into the historical necessity of the birth of the subspecialty and the therapeutic effect of reading texts of literature for the well-being of future clinicians. Another objective of my dissertation is to demonstrate to the scholars of literature and medicine in the United States the importance of cultural diversity in the selection of reading materials. Cross-cultural sensitivity has been one of the most urgent issues in the practice of medicine, health care, and bioethics. Part II is so crafted that Japanese educators may note the possibility of their literary tradition serving to expose their students to opportunities for moral inquiry and deliberation. Reading Japanese works of literature with topics that deeply concern the human condition may work for Western audiences as an enrichment program of cultural awareness and literacy. Part III offers my model programs for an international collaboration in literature and medicine. I have selected nine pairs of Western and Japanese texts of literature and illness narrative. This part also works as an advanced course of English comprehension for Japanese students. By reading each combination of works that have a common theme, one can be aware of differences in ways medical and ethical issues, such as autonomy and decision making, are addressed in another culture and can acknowledge universally compelling human suffering in the descriptions of pain, illness, aging, relationships, caring, and dying and death. Advisors/Committee Members: Hudson Jones, Anne (advisor), Carter, Michele A (committeeMember), Vanderpool, Harold Y (committeeMember), Huang, Frederick S (committeeMember), Poirier, Suzanne (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Literature and Medicine; Medical Education; Medical Humanities; Humanities; Health-Care Ethics; Japanese Medical Schools; Japanese Literature; Americal Literature; Narratives of Illness; Illness Culture; Caregiving; Nursing; Apollo; Physician-Authors; Impaired Physicians; Tuberculosis; Trauma; Trauma Studies; Mental Retardation; Disability; Empathy; Cultural Studies; Spirituality; Abortion; Mental Illness; Feminist Studies; Aging; Cancer Narratives; Death and Dying; Euthanasia; Suicide; Autonomy; Disclosure; Decision Making; Curricula

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (n.d.). Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of . (Thesis). University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of .” Thesis, University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of .” Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

author] [. Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of . [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.