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You searched for subject:(Impact on wellbeing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of South Africa

1. Tshenkeng, Boitumelo Florence. The psychosocial effects of AIDS and the development of identity amongst AIDS orphans .

Degree: 2009, University of South Africa

The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of children orphaned by HIV/AIDS and its impact on their identity development. The qualitative research paradigm was chosen for the purpose of this study. In depth interviews were held with three young adults who lost one or both parents to HIV/AIDS when they were young. Hermeneutics thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. The study’s results identified different psychosocial issues associated with HIV/AIDS which were considered to be an influence in the lives of participants and their identity development. The results indicate that HIV/AIDS still has a strong and negative connotation which influenced the participants’ attitude and behaviour, including the development of their sense of identity. Advisors/Committee Members: Matoane, Matshepo (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: HIV/AIDS impact; Attitude on HIV/AIDS; HIV/AIDS orphans; Psychological wellbeing; Households

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APA (6th Edition):

Tshenkeng, B. F. (2009). The psychosocial effects of AIDS and the development of identity amongst AIDS orphans . (Masters Thesis). University of South Africa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3098

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tshenkeng, Boitumelo Florence. “The psychosocial effects of AIDS and the development of identity amongst AIDS orphans .” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of South Africa. Accessed October 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3098.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tshenkeng, Boitumelo Florence. “The psychosocial effects of AIDS and the development of identity amongst AIDS orphans .” 2009. Web. 24 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tshenkeng BF. The psychosocial effects of AIDS and the development of identity amongst AIDS orphans . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Africa; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3098.

Council of Science Editors:

Tshenkeng BF. The psychosocial effects of AIDS and the development of identity amongst AIDS orphans . [Masters Thesis]. University of South Africa; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/3098


University of Waikato

2. Harris, Parewahaika Erenora Te Korowhiti. Wāhine Whaiora: Māori Women's Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery .

Degree: 2014, University of Waikato

This research examines the unique, lived experiences of wāhine Māori (Māori women) who have been diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder and who are currently living ‘well’. Recent literature indicates that Māori present at higher rates than non-Māori with bipolar disorder. However, there is little qualitative information about the nature of their experiences, as well as sparse detail of the impacts that bipolar has on their everyday living. The purpose of this research is to highlight Māori women’s experiences of bipolar disorder from initial presentation and assessment through to diagnosis, treatment and recovery. It focuses on the impact bipolar disorder has on women’s relationships with their tamariki (children), whānau (family), and partners, while also exploring social and personal impacts, help-seeking patterns, and stories of recovery. This research heard the stories of 11 wāhine Māori using a narrative-storying technique to allow wāhine to share their unique experiences as they recalled them. A thematic analysis was then used to identify key themes that depicted their journeys of: • Illness and symptom presentation; • Consequences and impacts of bipolar disorder; • Support and help-seeking; and • Wellness and recovery. The intent of this research is to create an awareness of the nature of bipolar disorder as it affects wāhine Māori. It endeavours to expose the experiences they have encountered and their aspirations to be better supported by whānau, and community organisations in their attempts to live active and well lives. Advisors/Committee Members: Waitoki, Waikaremoana (advisor), Nikora, Linda Waimarie (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Māori health; mental health; bipolar disorder; lived experiences; recovery; Māori women; mental illness; whānau support; Māori mental health; psychology; indigenous psychology; wellbeing; indigenous mental health; barriers to wellness; whānau ora; kaupapa Māori; abuse; help seeking; support; unmet needs; whānau connection; whānau; parental mental illness; New Zealand mental health; narrative inquiry; whaiora; impact on family; family support; qualitative research; wellness; wellbeing; women with mental illness; women with bipolar disorder; indigenous wellbeing; Māori with bipolar disorder; wāhine Māori

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harris, P. E. T. K. (2014). Wāhine Whaiora: Māori Women's Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery . (Masters Thesis). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/8782

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harris, Parewahaika Erenora Te Korowhiti. “Wāhine Whaiora: Māori Women's Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery .” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Waikato. Accessed October 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/8782.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harris, Parewahaika Erenora Te Korowhiti. “Wāhine Whaiora: Māori Women's Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery .” 2014. Web. 24 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Harris PETK. Wāhine Whaiora: Māori Women's Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Waikato; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/8782.

Council of Science Editors:

Harris PETK. Wāhine Whaiora: Māori Women's Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery . [Masters Thesis]. University of Waikato; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/8782


AUT University

3. Tuwe, Kudakwashe. African Communities in New Zealand: An Investigation of Their Employment Experiences and the Impact on Their Well-being Using African Oral Tradition of Storytelling as Research Methodology .

Degree: AUT University

This qualitative study seeks to investigate and identify the key employment-related experiences and challenges faced by New Zealand-based African communities and the impact of these experiences on their well-being. The African oral tradition of storytelling was used (as a methodology) to critically examine the meanings, feelings and experiences of these communities (Olupona, 1990; Tuwe, 2016). The use of African storytelling enabled African community groups and individual participants to share their “lived” experiences regarding the employment-related experiences and challenges within New Zealand. The main research question was: What are the main employment challenges faced by African communities in New Zealand? The Labour Disadvantage Theory (LDT) and Critical Race Theory (CRT) were used as theoretical frameworks. LDT theory states that most minority groups are disadvantaged and excluded from the labour market and sometimes coerced (by the system) into starting small businesses (Li, 1997). Some individuals end up on state benefits because of not getting employment (Li, 1997). CRT is widely used to examine issues of racism and discrimination (Bell, 1985; E. Taylor, Gillborn, & Ladson-Billings, 2009). In the context of my study, CRT was utilised to investigate racism in employment regarding Africans in New Zealand. These two theories will be used to explore the employment experiences and challenges faced by African communities in New Zealand. In-depth discussions using face-to-face interviews with 20 individual participants and storytelling in the African tradition with four community groups provided the data to critically examine these employment experiences. For the purposes of this study, I will refer to community groups as communities. One of the unique features of this study is the concept of communities in storytelling. This thesis uses African storytelling as the research methodology (Achebe, 1959; Olupona, 1990) and the approach of using communities was more than the focus group concept. Community voices expressed common experiences, worldviews, thoughts and feelings of the African communities regarding employment issues. According to McMillan and Chavis (1986), the characteristics of a community include place or locality, interest and communion. In the context of this study, place refers to New Zealand. Common interest concerns employment experiences. Communion refers to ‘spirit of community’, and ‘sense of belonging’ (Ife, 1995) which is enshrined in the African concept of Ubuntu. Ubuntu means ‘I am what I am because of you’ (Mandela, 1994.p.10). The original contribution to the body of knowledge of my study is in three specific areas namely; the utilisation of the African oral tradition of storytelling as a methodology, the concept of communities in storytelling or the use of community group discussions (referred to as communities) as opposed to contemporary focus groups and the application of the African philosophy of Ubuntu. The African storytelling provided African communities in New Zealand an… Advisors/Committee Members: Nakhid, Camille (advisor), Neill, Carol (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Employment experiences for Africans in New Zealand; African communities in New Zealand; Africans in New Zealand; African storytelling; Ubuntu philosophy; Impact on wellbeing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tuwe, K. (n.d.). African Communities in New Zealand: An Investigation of Their Employment Experiences and the Impact on Their Well-being Using African Oral Tradition of Storytelling as Research Methodology . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11906

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tuwe, Kudakwashe. “African Communities in New Zealand: An Investigation of Their Employment Experiences and the Impact on Their Well-being Using African Oral Tradition of Storytelling as Research Methodology .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed October 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11906.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tuwe, Kudakwashe. “African Communities in New Zealand: An Investigation of Their Employment Experiences and the Impact on Their Well-being Using African Oral Tradition of Storytelling as Research Methodology .” Web. 24 Oct 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Tuwe K. African Communities in New Zealand: An Investigation of Their Employment Experiences and the Impact on Their Well-being Using African Oral Tradition of Storytelling as Research Methodology . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2019 Oct 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11906.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Tuwe K. African Communities in New Zealand: An Investigation of Their Employment Experiences and the Impact on Their Well-being Using African Oral Tradition of Storytelling as Research Methodology . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11906

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.