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You searched for subject:(Hyperarticulation). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Nadeu Rota, Marianna. The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish.

Degree: PhD, 0307, 2013, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Lexical-stress languages tend to display stress-induced vowel quality variation. In some languages the effect is very salient, resulting in a smaller vowel inventory in unstressed syllables and stress-conditioned rule-governed vowel alternations within paradigms (phonological vowel reduction). Other languages exhibit only slight phonetic variation between vowels in stressed and unstressed syllables (phonetic vowel reduction). Regarding the latter, two main hypotheses of how prosodic prominence affects vowel production have been proposed. Based on experimental data from Germanic languages, their empirical basis is still rather limited. A deeper understanding of the effects of prosodic prominence on vowels requires careful experimentation on an expanded set of languages. This dissertation investigates the effects of lexical stress and intonational pitch accent on vowel production in Spanish and Catalan. Although closely related, these languages differ importantly in their phonology. The five Spanish vowels can appear in stressed and unstressed syllables. In Central Catalan, however, seven stressed vowels alternate with only three unstressed vowels. Comparing these languages allows us to observe how the existence of phonological vowel reduction conditions the operation of phonetic reduction. Stress-induced vowel centralization or reduction has sometimes been attributed to decreased vowel duration in weak prosodic positions. Thus, the role of duration is further investigated by manipulating speech rate. The results show that in both languages vowels produced at faster rate are shorter and less peripheral than those produced at normal rate. Interestingly, the effects of stress differ in these languages. For Catalan, unstressed vowels are shorter and more centralized than stressed vowels. On the other hand, Spanish speakers exhibit individual effects of stress, suggesting that the use of vowel quality to signal stress is not conventionalized. In addition, in Catalan, the presence of a prenuclear accent in a broad focus utterance does not affect vowel quality or duration of lexically stressed vowels. Yet, lexically unstressed vowels are longer and have more extreme vowel formants under emphatic accent. This dissertation provides a comprehensive description of prosodic effects on vowel production in Catalan and Spanish, hence contributing to a body of cross-linguistic research dealing with the influence of prosody at the segmental level. Advisors/Committee Members: Hualde, Jose Ignacio (advisor), Hualde, Jose Ignacio (Committee Chair), Cole, Jennifer S. (committee member), Escobar, Anna Maria (committee member), Shih, Chilin (committee member), Shosted, Ryan K. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Phonetic Vowel Reduction; Catalan; Spanish; Vowel Quality; Hyperarticulation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nadeu Rota, M. (2013). The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nadeu Rota, Marianna. “The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed August 11, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nadeu Rota, Marianna. “The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish.” 2013. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Nadeu Rota M. The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547.

Council of Science Editors:

Nadeu Rota M. The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547


University of Arizona

2. Nelson, Noah Richard. Contrastive Hyperarticulation of Word-Initial Stops in a Conversational Corpus .

Degree: 2019, University of Arizona

In this dissertation, I seek to clarify the nature of contrastive hyperarticulation. Unlike other kinds of hyperarticulation found in the literature, such as clear-speech hyperarticulation or the hyperarticulation of Lindblom’s (1990) Hyper-articulation and Hypo-articulation (H & H) Theory, contrastive hyperarticulation is defined not in terms of articulatory durations or gestural extents, but rather in terms of phonetic realizations that enhance the perceptual distance between the target and competing lexical forms. Despite a growing number of studies over the past decade that have investigated what might be described as contrastive hyperarticulation, the phenomenon is still not very well defined or understood. For example, some researchers have suggested that the total number of lexical-phonological neighbors to a given target word is correlated with hyperarticulation of individual phonetic cues in that target word (e.g., Fox et al., 2015). Other researchers, however, have suggested that only the existence of the specific lexical-phonological neighbor that contrasts with the target word in the measured phonetic cue will correlate with hyperarticulation of that phonetic cue (e.g., Wedel et al., 2018). In addition to uncertainty regarding the kinds of lexical competition that trigger contrastive hyperarticulation, researchers have also suggested different phonetic outcomes of this competition-driven hyperarticulation. Some researchers have suggested that, as a form of hyperarticulation, contrastive hyperarticulation can only be realized in the form of phonetic enhancement (e.g., Goldrick et al., 2013; Fricke et al., 2016). Other researchers, however, have suggested that the phonetic outcomes of contrastive hyperarticulation can include instances of phonetic reduction (such as decreased phonetic durations) in addition to more traditionally defined hyperarticulation (such as increased phonetic durations; Seyfarth et al., 2016; Wedel et al., 2018). In this dissertation I clarify both the triggers and outcomes of contrastive hyperarticulation in two studies. The first study was designed to sample a large hypothesis space regarding the kinds of lexical competitors that might trigger contrastive hyperarticulation of word-initial stop voicing contrasts in spontaneous English speech. Contrastive hyperarticulation was identified in the form of enhanced voice onset time contrasts between voiced and voiceless stops (longer voice onset times in voiceless stops, and shorter voice onset times in voiced stops). A number of possible metrics of lexical competition were evaluated as predictors of these voice onset time realizations based on the literature, including overall neighborhood density, the existence of the initial stop voicing minimal pair competitor, and a number of metrics varying in the position or type of competition between target and competitor. It was found that the existence of the initial stop voicing minimal pair competitor was a better predictor of voice onset time measurements than any other metric of lexical… Advisors/Committee Members: Wedel, Andrew B (advisor), Ussishkin, Adam (committeemember), Hammond, Michael (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: contrast enhancement; fundamental frequency; hyperarticulation; minimal pairs; neighborhood density; voice onset time

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nelson, N. R. (2019). Contrastive Hyperarticulation of Word-Initial Stops in a Conversational Corpus . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636591

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nelson, Noah Richard. “Contrastive Hyperarticulation of Word-Initial Stops in a Conversational Corpus .” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed August 11, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636591.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nelson, Noah Richard. “Contrastive Hyperarticulation of Word-Initial Stops in a Conversational Corpus .” 2019. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Nelson NR. Contrastive Hyperarticulation of Word-Initial Stops in a Conversational Corpus . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2019. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636591.

Council of Science Editors:

Nelson NR. Contrastive Hyperarticulation of Word-Initial Stops in a Conversational Corpus . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/636591

3. Osfar, Megan J. Articulation of whispered alveolar consonants.

Degree: MA, 0301, 2011, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This thesis explores the articulation of whispered and normally-spoken alveolar consonants through the use of electropalatography (EPG). While whisper is a well-researched topic, most prior studies have been limited to glottal and acoustic examinations. This study aims to directly measure the articulatory changes speech undergoes when it is whispered. Alveolar consonants /t/, /d/, and /n/ were studied in /iCi/, /aCa/, and /uCu/ environments. Maximum center of gravity, average center of gravity, contacted surface area, and contacted surface area variability were measured. Whispered consonants were found to have a greater duration and COG than normal consonants. Whispered consonants also showed evidence of hyperarticulation: they had lower surface area contact percentages and variability versus normal speech. Advisors/Committee Members: Shosted, Ryan K. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: whisper; alveolar; consonants; hyperarticulation; electropalatography (EPG)

…2006; Löfqvist and Gracco, 1997). Hyperarticulation, then, may be associated with less… …hyperarticulation. 1.5.1 Acoustic and aerodynamic studies Schwartz (1972) found whispered… …theoretical discussion of the articulatory phenomena of hyperarticulation and hypoarticulation. One… …Because different phenomena are sometimes denoted by the terms hyperarticulation and… …means that, in whisper, we expect to see hyperarticulation. What does hyperarticulation look… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Osfar, M. J. (2011). Articulation of whispered alveolar consonants. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/26173

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Osfar, Megan J. “Articulation of whispered alveolar consonants.” 2011. Thesis, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed August 11, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/26173.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Osfar, Megan J. “Articulation of whispered alveolar consonants.” 2011. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Osfar MJ. Articulation of whispered alveolar consonants. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/26173.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Osfar MJ. Articulation of whispered alveolar consonants. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/26173

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.