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You searched for subject:(Hydrologic models Reliability). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Maalel, Khlifa, 1955-. Reliability analysis applied to modeling of hydrologic processes.

Degree: 1983, University of Florida

Subjects/Keywords: Hydrological modeling; Mathematical independent variables; Mathematical variables; Maximum likelihood estimations; Modeling; Parametric models; Rain; Statistical estimation; Statistical models; Statistics; Hydrologic models  – Reliability; Hydrology  – Statistical methods

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Maalel, Khlifa, 1. (1983). Reliability analysis applied to modeling of hydrologic processes. (Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00032923

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maalel, Khlifa, 1955-. “Reliability analysis applied to modeling of hydrologic processes.” 1983. Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed January 23, 2020. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00032923.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maalel, Khlifa, 1955-. “Reliability analysis applied to modeling of hydrologic processes.” 1983. Web. 23 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Maalel, Khlifa 1. Reliability analysis applied to modeling of hydrologic processes. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Florida; 1983. [cited 2020 Jan 23]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00032923.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Maalel, Khlifa 1. Reliability analysis applied to modeling of hydrologic processes. [Thesis]. University of Florida; 1983. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00032923

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

2. Crawley, P. D. (Philip David). Risk and reliability assessment of multiple reservoir water supply headworks systems / by Philip David Crawley.

Degree: 1995, University of Adelaide

Subjects/Keywords: 628.1.001.573(942); Reliability (Engineering) Mathematical models.; Water consumption Economic aspects.; Water transfer Economic aspects.; Water-supply South Australia Mathematical models.; Risk assessment.; Hydrologic models.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crawley, P. D. (. D. (1995). Risk and reliability assessment of multiple reservoir water supply headworks systems / by Philip David Crawley. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/18555

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crawley, P D (Philip David). “Risk and reliability assessment of multiple reservoir water supply headworks systems / by Philip David Crawley.” 1995. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed January 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/18555.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crawley, P D (Philip David). “Risk and reliability assessment of multiple reservoir water supply headworks systems / by Philip David Crawley.” 1995. Web. 23 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Crawley PD(D. Risk and reliability assessment of multiple reservoir water supply headworks systems / by Philip David Crawley. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 1995. [cited 2020 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/18555.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Crawley PD(D. Risk and reliability assessment of multiple reservoir water supply headworks systems / by Philip David Crawley. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 1995. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/18555

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Riano, Alejandro. The Shift of Precipitation Maxima on the Annual Maximum Series using Regional Climate Model Precipitation Data.

Degree: MS, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2013, Arizona State University

Ten regional climate models (RCMs) and atmosphere-ocean generalized model parings from the North America Regional Climate Change Assessment Program were used to estimate the shift of extreme precipitation due to climate change using present-day and future-day climate scenarios. RCMs emulate winter storms and one-day duration events at the sub-regional level. Annual maximum series were derived for each model pairing, each modeling period; and for annual and winter seasons. The reliability ensemble average (REA) method was used to qualify each RCM annual maximum series to reproduce historical records and approximate average predictions, because there are no future records. These series determined (a) shifts in extreme precipitation frequencies and magnitudes, and (b) shifts in parameters during modeling periods. The REA method demonstrated that the winter season had lower REA factors than the annual season. For the winter season the RCM pairing of the Hadley regional Model 3 and the Geophysical Fluid-Dynamics Laboratory atmospheric-land generalized model had the lowest REA factors. However, in replicating present-day climate, the pairing of the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics' Regional Climate Model Version 3 with the Geophysical Fluid-Dynamics Laboratory atmospheric-land generalized model was superior. Shifts of extreme precipitation in the 24-hour event were measured using precipitation magnitude for each frequency in the annual maximum series, and the difference frequency curve in the generalized extreme-value-function parameters. The average trend of all RCM pairings implied no significant shift in the winter annual maximum series, however the REA-selected models showed an increase in annual-season precipitation extremes: 0.37 inches for the 100-year return period and for the winter season suggested approximately 0.57 inches for the same return period. Shifts of extreme precipitation were estimated using predictions 70 years into the future based on RCMs. Although these models do not provide climate information for the intervening 70 year period, the models provide an assertion on the behavior of future climate. The shift in extreme precipitation may be significant in the frequency distribution function, and will vary depending on each model-pairing condition. The proposed methodology addresses the many uncertainties associated with the current methodologies dealing with extreme precipitation.

Subjects/Keywords: Civil engineering; Hydrologic sciences; Water resources management; climate change; frequency analysis; NARCAAP; precipitation maxima; regional climate models; reliability ensemble average

…Variation Among Regional Climate Models ................53 Reliability Ensemble Average… …77 Qualifying Models Using the Reliability Ensemble Average Method ...............77 What… …51 8. Reliability Bias per Regional Climate Models… …Reliability Ensemble Average for all the Regional Climate Models. ........................59 xvi… …Reliability Ensemble Average for All Regional Climate Models..............................60 14… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Riano, A. (2013). The Shift of Precipitation Maxima on the Annual Maximum Series using Regional Climate Model Precipitation Data. (Masters Thesis). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/20926

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Riano, Alejandro. “The Shift of Precipitation Maxima on the Annual Maximum Series using Regional Climate Model Precipitation Data.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Arizona State University. Accessed January 23, 2020. http://repository.asu.edu/items/20926.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Riano, Alejandro. “The Shift of Precipitation Maxima on the Annual Maximum Series using Regional Climate Model Precipitation Data.” 2013. Web. 23 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Riano A. The Shift of Precipitation Maxima on the Annual Maximum Series using Regional Climate Model Precipitation Data. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Arizona State University; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 23]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/20926.

Council of Science Editors:

Riano A. The Shift of Precipitation Maxima on the Annual Maximum Series using Regional Climate Model Precipitation Data. [Masters Thesis]. Arizona State University; 2013. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/20926

.