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You searched for subject:(Human milk banking). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of California – San Francisco

1. Sigurdson, Krista Mary Smith. Emerging Milk Exchanges: Human Milk Banking, Sharing and Technoscience.

Degree: Sociology, 2015, University of California – San Francisco

Human milk is being exchanged today in ways that are increasingly fraught and contentious. Non-profit milk banks are working hard to keep up with increasing demand from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) for banked donor milk (BDM); informal exchanges have exploded through the use of Facebook platforms designed for milk sharing and other websites designed for milk selling; and for-profit entities are competing for donated human milk and for hospital-customers of banked donor milk. In this contested space, issues of safety, and the ethical procurement and distribution of human milk are ubiquitous.This dissertation follows a multi-cited ethnography of non-profit human milk banking, informal milk sharing and the use of human milk in biomedical innovation both in for-profit and academic settings. Drawing on both feminist science and technology studies and situational analysis, I argue that there are two key issues that make contemporary forms of human milk exchange particularly contentious, what I call “the two donor dynamic” and “the problem of commodification”. I argue that the ways value is constructed in the different forms of exchange under consideration negotiate these issues in unique ways that set out moral/ontological understandings about human milk. Non-profit banking establishes value through logics of surplus, scarcity, safety and care where (for example) donors are cared for and understood as breastfeeding mothers first and donors second and recipients are prioritized according to medical need because of the scarcity of BDM. Informal sharing networks are establishing themselves as forms of biosocial affective economies where a mother’s too much or too little milk can be experienced as breastfeeding problems and informal exchange as a form of relief. I argue that corporate entities and academic centers developing products from human milk employ promissory understandings of breast milk as that which is both best for a baby and possibly offering biomedical advancement (and sometimes profit).

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Gender studies; biomedical innovation; breastfeeding; breast milk; human milk banking; human milk sharing; tissue exchange

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sigurdson, K. M. S. (2015). Emerging Milk Exchanges: Human Milk Banking, Sharing and Technoscience. (Thesis). University of California – San Francisco. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/319639p1

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sigurdson, Krista Mary Smith. “Emerging Milk Exchanges: Human Milk Banking, Sharing and Technoscience.” 2015. Thesis, University of California – San Francisco. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/319639p1.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sigurdson, Krista Mary Smith. “Emerging Milk Exchanges: Human Milk Banking, Sharing and Technoscience.” 2015. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sigurdson KMS. Emerging Milk Exchanges: Human Milk Banking, Sharing and Technoscience. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – San Francisco; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/319639p1.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sigurdson KMS. Emerging Milk Exchanges: Human Milk Banking, Sharing and Technoscience. [Thesis]. University of California – San Francisco; 2015. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/319639p1

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

2. Kwist, Andrew. Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services.

Degree: 2018, University of Washington

Introduction: Infant feeding practices and lactation support when mother’s own milk is unavailable, especially among vulnerable infants in neonate intensive care unit situations (i.e. pre-term, low birthweight) are not well understood globally. Integration of human milk banking services and provision of donor human milk as early essential newborn care may offer the support and resources necessary to achieve optimal infant feeding practices. Previous studies suggest improved breastfeeding rates at discharge with the introduction of an integrated human milk banking program, however this finding has not been well characterized. An impact evaluation is underway to investigate changes in infant feeding practices to increase safe use of human milk from before and after integration of a human milk bank at the Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children in Da Nang, Vietnam. Methods: A pretest and posttest evaluation was conducted surrounding the opening of the human milk bank at the Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children in Da Nang, Vietnam, a WHO-designated Center of Excellence for early essential newborn care. All infants admitted to the neonatal ward on day one of life were included and 14 days of data collection took place on volumes, routes, and types of feed for each infant until discharge or death. Outcomes of interest were exclusive quality-controlled human milk feeding, any exposure to formula, and any exposure to another mother’s milk. Chi-squared tests and the Mantel-Haenszel method were used to investigate the associations between exposure to the milk bank and each outcome of interest. Results: The proportion of infants fed exclusive quality-controlled human milk was significantly higher in the posttest group relative to the pretest group on all 14 days of the study; posttest exclusive quality-controlled human milk feeding was 100% at day 1 and reduced steadily through follow-up to 65% by day 14, while pretest was 4% at day 1 and reached 0% by day 9 (all 2 p<0.001). The proportion of infants exposed to formula was significantly lower in the posttest group than the pretest group during the first seven days of data collection (all 2 p<0.05) and was similar thereafter; posttest exposure to formula was between 0% and 4% throughout follow-up while pretest exposure to formula was 36% at day 1 and reduced to 4% by day 8. The proportion of infants exposed to another mother’s milk was significantly lower in the posttest group compared to the pretest group through day 10 (all 2 p<0.001); posttest exposure to another mother's milk was between 0 and 3% throughout follow-up, while pretest exposure to another mother's milk was 73% at day 1 and reduced throughout follow-up to 4% by day 14. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest a positive impact of the integration of a human milk bank into newborn care services in Vietnam, specifically for an increase in the uptake of quality-controlled human milk and decreases in exposure to formula and another mother’s milk. This study informs future models for integrating human milk… Advisors/Committee Members: Hawes, Stephen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Breastfeeding; Donor human milk; Human milk banking; Infant feeding; Neonatal health; Vietnam; Public health; Nutrition; Epidemiology; Epidemiology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kwist, A. (2018). Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kwist, Andrew. “Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services.” 2018. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kwist, Andrew. “Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services.” 2018. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kwist A. Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kwist A. Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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