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You searched for subject:(Households With Children). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of South Carolina

1. Drucker, Erin Rebekah. Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina.

Degree: MS, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2015, University of South Carolina

Purpose: Food insecurity is a major public health problem in the United States (US) with 14.5% of US households having experienced some level of food insecurity in 2012. Among households with children, 20% experienced low food security in 2012, and in half of these households, both the children and adults were affected. Food insecurity among children can have lifelong negative health and mental effects. Life events are defined as self-­‐reported life changes, which create a strain on resources and an opportunity for food insecurity, Methods: The Midlands Family Study (MFS) was a cross-­‐ sectional study that surveyed households with children within an eight-­‐county region in South Carolina between March 2012 and May 2013 and obtained information on food security and life events. Of 538 total participants, 511 remained for analysis: 28% were food secure (FS), 37.2% were low food secure (LFS), and 34.1% experienced very low food security among children (VLFS-­‐C). Life events were analyzed by overall positive and negative count and summed impact, and four life event types were created with author consensus to analyze positive and negative life event counts and summed impact by event type. Results: VLFS-­‐C and LFS participants reported experiencing more negative life events, and greater summed impact of negative life events compared to FS participants. Higher count and impact of negative life events are associated with risk for VLFS-­‐C and LFS status. When testing for independent associations of specific event types with food security status, positive events involving family and relationships were associated with decreased odds of food insecurity. Conclusion: Experiencing a higher number of negative life events, as well as perceiving those events as having a greater impact, is associated with higher odds of VLFS-­‐C and LFS status among the MFS study population. Although most types of positive life events were not associated with food security status, events involving family and other relationships had a negative association with food insecurity. Thus, interventions against food insecurity should be targeted at establishing and strengthening positive familial, community and social relationships. Advisors/Committee Members: Angela Liese.

Subjects/Keywords: Epidemiology; Medicine and Health Sciences; Public Health; Food Security Status; Life Events; Households With Children; Midlands; South Carolina

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drucker, E. R. (2015). Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina. (Masters Thesis). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drucker, Erin Rebekah. “Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of South Carolina. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drucker, Erin Rebekah. “Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina.” 2015. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Drucker ER. Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718.

Council of Science Editors:

Drucker ER. Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina. [Masters Thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718


University of North Texas

2. Brown, Peggy Brandt. Educationally At-risk College Students From Single-parent and Two-parent Households: an Analysis of Differences Employing Cooperative Institutional Research Program Data.

Degree: 2005, University of North Texas

Using factors of low income, parents' levels of education, and family composition as determinants of educationally at-risk status, study investigated differences between first generation, undergraduate college students from families in lowest quintile of income in the U.S, One group consisted of students from single-parent households and the other of students from two-parent households. Data were from CIRP 2003 College Student Survey (CSS) and its matched data from the Freshman Survey (Student Information Form - SIF). Differences examined included student inputs, involvements, outcomes, and collegiate environments. Included is portrait of low income, first generation college students who successfully navigated U.S. higher education. The number of cases dropped from 15,601 matched SIF/CSS cases to 308 cases of low income, first generation college students (175 from single-parent households and 133 from two-parent households). Most of the 308 attended private, 4-year colleges. Data yielded more similarities than differences between groups. Statistically significant differences (p < .05) existed in 9 of 100 variables including race/ ethnicity, whether or not English was first language, and concern for ability to finance education as freshman. Data were not generalizable to all low income, first generation college students because of lack of public, 4-year and 2-year colleges and universities in dataset. Graduating seniors' average expected debt in June 2003 was 23,824 for students from single-parent households and 19,867 for those from two-parent households. 32% from single-parent households and 22% from two-parent households expected more than 25,000 of debt. Variables used on SIF proved effective tools to develop derived variables to identify low income, first generation college students from single-parent and two-parent households within CIRP database. Methodology to develop derived variables is explained. Advisors/Committee Members: Bush, V. Barbara, Newsom, Ronald W., Glover, Rebecca.

Subjects/Keywords: College students  – United States.; College attendance  – United States.; Youth with social disabilities  – Education (Higher)  – United States.; Children of single parents  – Education (Higher)  – United States.; Academic achievement  – United States.; CIRP; Cooperative Institutional Research Program; college students; educationally at-risk; first generation students; low income students; single-parent households; two-parent households

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brown, P. B. (2005). Educationally At-risk College Students From Single-parent and Two-parent Households: an Analysis of Differences Employing Cooperative Institutional Research Program Data. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4897/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Peggy Brandt. “Educationally At-risk College Students From Single-parent and Two-parent Households: an Analysis of Differences Employing Cooperative Institutional Research Program Data.” 2005. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4897/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Peggy Brandt. “Educationally At-risk College Students From Single-parent and Two-parent Households: an Analysis of Differences Employing Cooperative Institutional Research Program Data.” 2005. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Brown PB. Educationally At-risk College Students From Single-parent and Two-parent Households: an Analysis of Differences Employing Cooperative Institutional Research Program Data. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2005. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4897/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Brown PB. Educationally At-risk College Students From Single-parent and Two-parent Households: an Analysis of Differences Employing Cooperative Institutional Research Program Data. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2005. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4897/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.