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You searched for subject:(Hospital acoustics). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Messingher Lang, Gabriel. Relating hospital acoustics to staff outcomes in real and simulated settings.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2013, Georgia Tech

The sound environment in hospitals is complex. While there have been several studies that address the acoustic environment in hospitals, there is a limited amount of research done concerning the effect that noise has on staff. This thesis describes two related studies: 1) analysis of the relationships between acoustics and perceptual staff outcomes using an existing data set collected in real hospitals; 2) development of methodologies to test the relationships between acoustics and hospital staff task performance in a simulated laboratory setting. In the first study it was found that mental health and perception of noisiness were occupational factors that were related to the sound environment using a variety of acoustic metrics. Only a few acoustic metrics were shown to be statistically significant related to dependent variables in a direct correlation (e.g., as the acoustic conditions worsened the dependent variable also decreased). However, almost all acoustic metrics tested had a statistically significant relationship with mental health once subjective job strain was considered as a moderating factor. This means that while the direct impact of sound may not be immediately observable, sound may play a more significant role once subjective job strain is taken into account. In the second study, a new methodology was developed to directly relate staff task performance to noise and beta-tested on a single group of subjects. The methodology development included synthesizing a signal that was acoustically comparable to those heard in real hospitals in order to simulate a realistic noise exposure in a controlled environment. Additionally, objective methods of measuring performance and perception were devised by utilizing task performance scripts already validated in other studies and developing new surveys that could be administered to subjects to garner their perceived task performance and perceptions of the simulation room environment, including noise. Advisors/Committee Members: Ryherd, Erica E. (advisor), Ferri, Aldo (committee member), Ackerman, Jeremy D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Hospital acoustics; Staff outcomes; Noise

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Messingher Lang, G. (2013). Relating hospital acoustics to staff outcomes in real and simulated settings. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52922

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Messingher Lang, Gabriel. “Relating hospital acoustics to staff outcomes in real and simulated settings.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52922.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Messingher Lang, Gabriel. “Relating hospital acoustics to staff outcomes in real and simulated settings.” 2013. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Messingher Lang G. Relating hospital acoustics to staff outcomes in real and simulated settings. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52922.

Council of Science Editors:

Messingher Lang G. Relating hospital acoustics to staff outcomes in real and simulated settings. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52922

2. Moeller , Michael M., Jr. Noise environment characterization in military treatment facilities.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2012, Georgia Tech

Hospital sound environments are complex and hard to understand. One of the most important factors in these environments is the effective communication between staff members in regards to patient care and successful communication depends in part on the hospital’s sound environment. In this study, objective sound measurements as well as occupant perceptive data were collected at three hospitals. Sound pressure levels; including maximum, peak, minimum and equivalent levels were recorded in these hospitals, in addition to active impulse response measurements. Acoustic descriptors of the sound environment such as spectral content, level distributions, energy decay and temporal patterns were examined. The perception of the hospital soundscape (sound environment) was evaluated through surveys of the staff, patients and visitors to units. It was found that noise levels in all patient rooms and work areas were significantly higher than guidelines laid out in previous literature and by professional organizations. This work contributes to the field by broadening the metrics used to quantify hospital acoustic environments. In addition, this work added to the field by providing the most rigorous acoustic field measurement set published to date. This was done to create an accurate portrayal of the hospital soundscape environment. Advisors/Committee Members: Ryherd, Erica (advisor), Ferri, Aldo (committee member), Zimring, Craig (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Acoustics; Noise control; Noise Measurement; Sound; Hospital buildings Environmental engineering

…data on hospital acoustics, currently there are limited guidelines that cover the gamut of… …contributes to the field of hospital acoustics by providing a wider range of acoustic measurements… …such as office spaces and concert halls. This lack of data for hospital acoustics hinders… …22 Figure 5: A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq) for hospital 1… …31 Figure 6: A-weighted equivalent sound pressure (LAeq) for hospital 2, overlaid… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moeller , Michael M., J. (2012). Noise environment characterization in military treatment facilities. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48995

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moeller , Michael M., Jr. “Noise environment characterization in military treatment facilities.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48995.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moeller , Michael M., Jr. “Noise environment characterization in military treatment facilities.” 2012. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Moeller , Michael M. J. Noise environment characterization in military treatment facilities. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48995.

Council of Science Editors:

Moeller , Michael M. J. Noise environment characterization in military treatment facilities. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/48995

3. Okcu, Selen. Developing evidence based design metrics and methods for improving healthcare soundscapes.

Degree: PhD, Architecture, 2011, Georgia Tech

Healing and clinical work requires a complex choreography of architectural acoustic design in healthcare settings. In most healthcare settings, medical staff members conduct vital tasks that may have life-and-death implications. Patients visit the hospitals to heal. Their expectations include fast recovery, restful sleep, and privacy (i.e., speech privacy). However, sound environment qualities of the care settings often fall far from supporting the mission of hospitals. There is strong and growing evidence showing that effective soundscapes in healthcare settings potentially impact errors, healing and stress for patients, families and staff but it is still not clear what measures of the sound environment best predict key healthcare outcomes and what design strategies best impact those measures. By using a multi-method approach (i.e., objective and subjective noise level measurements, in-situ impulse response measurements, heuristic design analysis, theoretical studies, acoustic simulations and statistical analysis), this study aims to develop evidence based design strategies by statistically defining the relationships between three types of variables: (1) architectural floor-plate design metrics, (2) acoustic metrics, and (3) occupant response. The research is conducted in three phases. The first phase of the study compared the objective and subjective qualities of the hospital sound environments with different architectural designs, assessed the effectiveness of a newer acoustic metrics in capturing caregiver perceptions, and evaluated the impact of particular noise sources on caregiver outcomes. The second phase of the study tested the validity of an acoustic simulation tool in estimating the acoustic qualities of the healthcare soundscapes. The third phase of the study systematically explored the relationship between floor-plate design and acoustics of complex inter-connected nursing unit corridors. Even though the relationship between design and acoustics of proportional spaces (a.k.a. rooms with more traditional dimensions) has been well documented, the number of studies linking design and acoustics of complex non-proportional spaces such as inter-connected corridors still remains limited. The findings of the first phase show that critical care sound environments with different designs can vary drastically and impact caregivers` perceived wellbeing and task performance (e.g., patient auditory monitoring). Despite their extensive use, traditional noise metrics sometimes may not be effective in capturing unique characteristics of healthcare sound environments. This study validated the effectiveness of a new more detailed noise metric, "occurrence rate", in capturing the differences between acoustic characteristics of healthcare sound environments. Moreover, particular noise sources such as impulsive noises are likely to dominate the ICU sound environments and interfere with perceived caregiver health and performance. The findings of the second phase suggest the potential effectiveness of acoustic… Advisors/Committee Members: Craig Zimring (Committee Chair), Erica Ryherd (Committee Co-Chair), Ermal Shupuza (Committee Member), Howard Pelton (Committee Member), Sonit Bafna (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Architectural acoustics; Post occupancy evaluation; Healthcare soundscapes; Acoustic metrics; Evidence based design; Hospital layout; Soundproofing; Sound; Absorption of sound; Hospital architecture; Health facilities; Health facilities Design and construction

acoustics of inter-connected hospital corridors has not been investigated in previous research. To… …x28;in Chapter 6) by analyzing the acoustics of real-world hospital ward corridors via… …research on hospital acoustics indicate that hospitals have noisy and multisource sound… …performance; health outcomes and work overload. Further information about how hospital acoustics may… …LEVEL MEASUREMENT GUIDE APPENDIX E: HOSPITAL NOISE SURVEY QUESTIONS APPENDIX F: OCCURRENCE… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Okcu, S. (2011). Developing evidence based design metrics and methods for improving healthcare soundscapes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43695

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Okcu, Selen. “Developing evidence based design metrics and methods for improving healthcare soundscapes.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43695.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Okcu, Selen. “Developing evidence based design metrics and methods for improving healthcare soundscapes.” 2011. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Okcu S. Developing evidence based design metrics and methods for improving healthcare soundscapes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43695.

Council of Science Editors:

Okcu S. Developing evidence based design metrics and methods for improving healthcare soundscapes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/43695

.