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You searched for subject:(History gay family). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Minnesota

1. Galik, Angela E. Queer texts and the Cold War: how nationalism shaped U.S. lesbian and gay writing, 1945-1960.

Degree: PhD, American Studies: Advisor: Dr, 2009, University of Minnesota

This dissertation explores the impact of mainstream discourses of nationalism, gender, sexuality, race, and class on the development of lesbian and gay identities and communities in the United States in the early Cold War period (1945-1960) by analyzing the literary productions of several lesbian and gay writers. Placing neglected and forgotten texts alongside works by authors considered "canonical," I show how these writers responded in different ways to the dominant, anti-homosexual discourses that characterized the era. During this critically under-examined period in U.S. LGBT history, paranoia about Communist expansion led to the conflation, in the national imagination, of homosexuals with enemy agents, and government, mass media, the self-help establishment alike promoted the suburban nuclear family headed by a married heterosexual couple as an important line of national defense. Simultaneously, the 1950s saw the formation of the first public gay and lesbian rights organizations in the U.S., the publication of the country's first nationally-distributed lesbian and gay magazines, and an unprecedented flurry of novels published by gay and lesbian authors, ranging from high art to pulp paperback romance. In these conditions of seeming contradiction, of heavy state repression combined with optimism and new possibilities for self-expression, lesbians and gay men participated, through published writing, in a broad national conversation about the meanings of homosexuality. Gay and lesbian writers wrestled with the question of what it meant to be homosexual in the early Cold War United States, contested exclusionary and discriminatory understandings of the homosexual's place in society, and challenged the validity of rigid gender roles - as well as the United States' moral authority as the self-declared protector of democracy. The ways in which each individual author interacted with and responded to these hegemonic national discourses depended, to a great degree, on the author's specific social positioning within the interlocking hierarchies of privilege based on gender, sexuality, race, and class, as well as their larger ideological perspectives and political commitments. My dissertation teases out these specificities, illuminating previously unrecognized contributions to the national conversation about the meanings of homosexuality, examining the ways an author's multiple points of reference often led to the reproduction of competing ideologies within a single work. This project contributes to the work, within the field of LGBTQ Studies, of reclaiming and expanding the boundaries of a queer U.S. literary tradition by re-examining the textual productions of an era usually seen as a "dark age" between the social upheavals of World War II and the emergence of the gay liberation movement in the late 1960s. At the same time, by placing the discursive processes by which the meanings of homosexuality were negotiated during this period, highlighting the state of flux itself, my analysis makes it impossible to refer to a…

Subjects/Keywords: Family; History; Ideology; Lesbian and Gay; LGBT; Sexuality; American Studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Galik, A. E. (2009). Queer texts and the Cold War: how nationalism shaped U.S. lesbian and gay writing, 1945-1960. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/54427

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Galik, Angela E. “Queer texts and the Cold War: how nationalism shaped U.S. lesbian and gay writing, 1945-1960.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://purl.umn.edu/54427.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Galik, Angela E. “Queer texts and the Cold War: how nationalism shaped U.S. lesbian and gay writing, 1945-1960.” 2009. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Galik AE. Queer texts and the Cold War: how nationalism shaped U.S. lesbian and gay writing, 1945-1960. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/54427.

Council of Science Editors:

Galik AE. Queer texts and the Cold War: how nationalism shaped U.S. lesbian and gay writing, 1945-1960. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2009. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/54427


University of Dayton

2. Olive, James L. Life Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Postsecondary Students Who Choose To Persist: Education Against The Tide.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership, 2009, University of Dayton

The purpose of this study was to ascertain what factors enable some gay, lesbian,bisexual, and queer (GLBQ) students to persist in college whereas a significant number leave. Specifically, the research question that framed this study was "What factors in a gay, lesbian, bisexual, and queer person’s life history enable him or her to persist through higher education and successfully obtain an undergraduate degree?" A life history methodology (Bertaux, 1981; Cole, 2001; Denzin, 1989; Goodson,2001; Goodson & Sikes, 2001; Hatch & Wisniewski, 1995) was used to capture the lived experiences of 3 female and 3 male postsecondary students who self-identified as GLBQ and were on target to successfully complete their bachelor's degree within one academic year. Additionally, participants were asked to identify where they believed they reside on frequently cited queer identity development models (Cass, 1984; Coleman, 1982; Lipkin, 1999; Troiden, 1989). A grounded-theory approach to data analysis (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) wasutilized in order to identify the factors that help or hinder a GLBQ postsecondarystudent's academic progression. Ten common themes or factors were found to exist among the participants. Thesewere: (1) high behavioral expectations during childhood and adolescence; (2) a strong family connection; (3) strong work ethic; (4) high educational expectations; (5) guardian acceptance; (6) involvement in GLBQ activities on campus; (7) sexuality as a component of the whole person; (8) self-confidence and autonomy; (9) ability to deal with life’s obstacles while taking care of themselves and continuing forward; and (10) tendency toward planning and the possession of a post-graduation course of action. Recommendations for future research and implications for practice are presented. Advisors/Committee Members: Ridenour, Carolyn (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Families and Family Life; Higher Education; Multicultural Education; Personal Relationships; Social Research; life history; gay; lesbian; bisexual; queer; GLBQ; LGBQ; self authorship; oral narrative; postsecondary; homosexual

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olive, J. L. (2009). Life Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Postsecondary Students Who Choose To Persist: Education Against The Tide. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Dayton. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1240519522

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olive, James L. “Life Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Postsecondary Students Who Choose To Persist: Education Against The Tide.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Dayton. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1240519522.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olive, James L. “Life Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Postsecondary Students Who Choose To Persist: Education Against The Tide.” 2009. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Olive JL. Life Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Postsecondary Students Who Choose To Persist: Education Against The Tide. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Dayton; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1240519522.

Council of Science Editors:

Olive JL. Life Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Postsecondary Students Who Choose To Persist: Education Against The Tide. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Dayton; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1240519522


York University

3. Perdue, Katherine Anne. Writing Desire: The Love Letters of Frieda Fraser and Edith Williams.

Degree: PhD, History, 2015, York University

This dissertation analyzes the intimate relationship produced by and reflected in the written correspondence between Frieda Fraser and Edith Williams, arguably the largest correspondence of its kind in North America. Frieda Fraser was a professor of microbiology at the University of Toronto and Edith Williams was one of the first female veterinarians in Canada. Their correspondence was written from 1924 to 1927 and then intermittently from 1933 to 1943. This dissertation contends that Frieda’s and Edith’s correspondence was a place wherein the women created a self-defined sexual description that was in dialogue with cultural discourses that denoted the meaning of the modern lesbian. Frieda and Edith referred to themselves as “devoted women,” their designation of a sexual subjectivity that marked their differentiation from these discourses. Edith and Frieda arrived upon a unique notion of romantic devotion, shaped alongside an awareness of contemporary depictions of the lesbian in literature, in science, and in the theatre. This dissertation analyzes how two middle-class Canadian women came to live their lives as “devoted women” within a culture that did not recognize, nor mirror their sexual identities. Affected by modernism, Edith’s and Frieda’s letter-writing produced, enhanced, and helped the women define their desire for one another. Moreover, the women’s devoted relationship benefitted their medical careers and their medical careers benefitted their partnership. In relation to family and profession this dissertation asks to what degree was discretion employed in order to preserve their relationship? In focusing on the correspondence, this dissertation is more than an exercise in “finding the lesbians” in Canadian history: it asks “how did the lesbians find themselves?” Advisors/Committee Members: McPherson, Kathryn (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Canadian history; GLBT studies; Women's studies; Travel and Canadian women history; Writing desire; LGBT history; Lesbian love letters and analysis; Canadian women's history; 1920s and Canadian women; Modernism and letter writing; Correspondence and sexuality; Lesbian subjectivity; Women and medicine; Women doctors; Women veterinarians; Frieda Fraser; Edith Williams; New York Infirmary for Women and Children; Phipps Institute; Ontario Veterinary College; Donald Fraser; Technology and letter writing; 1920s culture and Canadian lesbian subjectivity; Racism and anti-semitism in Canadian medical history; Literature and early lesbian subjectivity in Canada; Lesbians in 1920s England; Lesbians in 1920s New York; Mothers and lesbian daughters' relationships in Toronto; Gender and women in medicine; Profession and passion; World War II fostering; Jenny Rodd; Connaught Laboratories; Edith Clarke; Murial McPhedran; Women interns; The Captive; Hirschfeld; La Garcon; Patient care-Canadian medical history; Obstetrics' history; History gay family; Literature theatre and lesbian subjectivity; Lesbianism – personal accounts; Middle-class professional lesbians in Canada; Canadian modernism and sexual subjectivity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Perdue, K. A. (2015). Writing Desire: The Love Letters of Frieda Fraser and Edith Williams. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/28211

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Perdue, Katherine Anne. “Writing Desire: The Love Letters of Frieda Fraser and Edith Williams.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/28211.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Perdue, Katherine Anne. “Writing Desire: The Love Letters of Frieda Fraser and Edith Williams.” 2015. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Perdue KA. Writing Desire: The Love Letters of Frieda Fraser and Edith Williams. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/28211.

Council of Science Editors:

Perdue KA. Writing Desire: The Love Letters of Frieda Fraser and Edith Williams. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/28211

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