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You searched for subject:(Historic sites Colorado). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas Tech University

1. Biltoft, Garret Lee. A museum for the Sand Creek massacre historic site.

Degree: M. Arch., Architecture, 1, Texas Tech University

By interpreting cultural and historical settlement patterns, through a process of Critical Regionalism, forms can be created to express a time and place. Advisors/Committee Members: Smith, Gary (committee member), Peters, Michael (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Architecture; Historic sites  – Colorado; Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site (Colo.)

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APA (6th Edition):

Biltoft, G. L. (1). A museum for the Sand Creek massacre historic site. (Masters Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/67016

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Biltoft, Garret Lee. “A museum for the Sand Creek massacre historic site.” 1. Masters Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/67016.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Biltoft, Garret Lee. “A museum for the Sand Creek massacre historic site.” 1. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Biltoft GL. A museum for the Sand Creek massacre historic site. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas Tech University; 1. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/67016.

Council of Science Editors:

Biltoft GL. A museum for the Sand Creek massacre historic site. [Masters Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 1. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/67016

2. Ugarte, Jessica Aurora. Most endangered lists and their implementation by statewide preservation advocacy organizations.

Degree: MSin Historic Preservation, Historic Preservation, 2011, University of Texas – Austin

A Most Endangered list is a common programmatic tool used by historic preservation advocacy groups. These lists allow the organizations to focus their support on a small, representative selection of threatened historic resources. While these programs are widely accepted and implemented, there has been no formal investigation into their use or study of the subtle differences that make each program unique. This thesis analyzes statewide Most Endangered programs with the goal of determining if there are variables that can enhance the program’s effectiveness at accomplishing the organization’s goals. Organizations that wish to examine the usability or effectiveness of their Most Endangered programs do not have easy access to the information that is needed for an objective analysis. This is the current situation at Preservation Texas, Texas’ statewide preservation advocacy organization. The staff there is currently evaluating the organization’s Most Endangered program, making this document a timely and useful tool for their use. This thesis seeks to provide a base from which Preservation Texas, or any preservation advocacy organization, can begin to examine their own program’s operations. For this project I performed research on statewide Most Endangered programs at both macro and micro levels. An initial investigation of the web-presence of these programs enabled me to make broad determinations about their operations. I then selected five of these organizations for a closer study. Through interviews and additional research, it was possible for me to begin to compare and contrast the programs while analyzing their differences from an impartial perspective. Through this careful study, I developed a list of eight criteria that are indicative of an effective Most Endangered program. In the final chapter I use these eight criteria to analyze Most Endangered programs, specifically the one operated by Preservation Texas. By applying my research and observations, I am able to reach constructive conclusions about the operations and functions of Preservation Texas’ Most Endangered program. While this thesis was written for the benefit of a specific organization, the findings are applicable to any organization that has, or is thinking about starting, a Most Endangered list. Advisors/Committee Members: Holleran, Michael (advisor), Penick, Monica Michelle, 1972- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Historic sites; National Trust for Historic Preservation; Preservation Texas; Colorado Preservation, Inc.; Mississippi Heritage Trust; Preservation New Jersey; Preserve Nevada; Washington Trust for Historic Preservation; United States; Conservation and restoration

…branched out to historic sites and structures. Through this background information, an… …Law 81-408, “an Act to provide for the preservation of historic American sites, buildings… …addition to owning and managing twenty-nine national Historic Sites and publishing the bi-monthly… …resources to historic sites that would not otherwise be addressed. ENDANGERED LISTS AS ADVOCACY… …historic sites.”47 # of New Most Endangered Lists by Year 4 3 2 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ugarte, J. A. (2011). Most endangered lists and their implementation by statewide preservation advocacy organizations. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2011-05-3561

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ugarte, Jessica Aurora. “Most endangered lists and their implementation by statewide preservation advocacy organizations.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2011-05-3561.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ugarte, Jessica Aurora. “Most endangered lists and their implementation by statewide preservation advocacy organizations.” 2011. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Ugarte JA. Most endangered lists and their implementation by statewide preservation advocacy organizations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2011. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2011-05-3561.

Council of Science Editors:

Ugarte JA. Most endangered lists and their implementation by statewide preservation advocacy organizations. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2011-05-3561


Colorado State University

3. Parks, Erin Margaret. How the past can be present for our future: archaeological interpretation for the public, the Lindenmeier Folsom site in Northern Colorado.

Degree: MA, Anthropology, 2010, Colorado State University

The Lindenmeier site is a significant Paleoindian prehistoric site located north of Fort Collins, Colorado in Larimer County. Lindenmeier was discovered in 1924 by Judge C.C. Coffin and later surveyed and excavated beginning in 1934 by Frank H.H. Roberts, Jr. and the Smithsonian Institution (Roberts 1936). The site uncovered thousands of lithic materials dating to the Folsom period that included 468 known Folsom projectile points (Ambler 1999; Gantt 2002; Wilmsen and Roberts 1978). The private ranch Lindenmeier is located on was purchased by the City of Fort Collins Natural Areas Program. Lindenmeier is now part of the Soapstone Prairie Natural Area and open to the public. Developing an appropriate cultural resource interpretation is essential because Lindenmeier is now open to the public. The opening of Lindenmeier created a necessary examination of other Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene interpretive sites within the Great Plains region. I examined six sites for this analysis: Lubbock Lake Landmark in Lubbock, Texas; Hudson-Meng near Crawford, Nebraska; the Mammoth site in Hot Springs, South Dakota; Blackwater Draw near Clovis, New Mexico; Pine Bluffs Windows on the Past Interpretive Center and Museum in Pine Bluffs, Wyoming; and Murray Springs near Sierra Vista, Arizona. Each of these six sites were visited and documented by examining three topics: archaeology, visitation, and public interpretation. Examination of archaeology at each site focused on the information visitors are receiving about the archaeological record and archaeological methods at the sites. The examination of archaeology provides a framework for public programs of the site. Second, visitation explores the type of people visiting the site, the reasons people are visiting, what types of facilities are offered to visitors, and site integrity and security. Examining visitation helps determine the logistics of management approach to the interpretation. Third, public interpretation analyzes how information is presented to visitors. Public interpretation includes educational materials such as brochures, interpretive panels, interpretive trails, and exhibits. Public interpretation also covers how the site is funded, associations with organizations, and how information is presented. The results of archaeology, visitation, and public interpretation analysis from the six sites are compared and contrasted. The results of that analysis are then used to make ideal recommendations for the cultural resource interpretation of Lindenmeier. Overall, examining interpretive sites dating to the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene period in the Great Plains region will provide the best model for Lindenmeier's interpretation. Advisors/Committee Members: LaBelle, Jason M. (advisor), Todd, Lawrence C., 1954- (committee member), Bright, Alan D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: public interpretation; public education; Paleoindian; Lindenmeier; archaeology; Folsom; Lindenmeier Site (Colo.)  – Management; Visitors' centers  – Colorado  – Lindenmeier Site; Visitors' centers  – Research  – West (U.S.); Historic sites  – Interpretive programs  – Research  – West (U.S.); Excavations (Archaeology)  – Interpretive programs  – Research  – West (U.S.)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parks, E. M. (2010). How the past can be present for our future: archaeological interpretation for the public, the Lindenmeier Folsom site in Northern Colorado. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45961

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parks, Erin Margaret. “How the past can be present for our future: archaeological interpretation for the public, the Lindenmeier Folsom site in Northern Colorado.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45961.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parks, Erin Margaret. “How the past can be present for our future: archaeological interpretation for the public, the Lindenmeier Folsom site in Northern Colorado.” 2010. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Parks EM. How the past can be present for our future: archaeological interpretation for the public, the Lindenmeier Folsom site in Northern Colorado. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2010. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45961.

Council of Science Editors:

Parks EM. How the past can be present for our future: archaeological interpretation for the public, the Lindenmeier Folsom site in Northern Colorado. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45961

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