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You searched for subject:(Heritage interpreter). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas Tech University

1. Cheng, Shu-yun. An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in taiwan.

Degree: Family and Consumer Sciences Education, 2005, Texas Tech University

The purposes of this study were to (a) establish conceivable indexes for professional competencies of heritage interpreters, (b) evaluate the existing training curriculum of heritage interpreters, and (c) examine the impacts of interpretation services on tourists¡¦ satisfaction at a tourist destination. Based on these specific objectives, three distinct studies were conducted. The first study aimed to identify interpreters¡¦ competencies through a self-reported survey obtained from the groups of heritage interpreters, hospitality educator, students, and tourists at the heritage sites. The second study summarized the opinions of interpreters and hospitality educators concerning an active interpretation-training curriculum. The third study examined the differences in satisfaction levels regarding tourists who received interpretation services (personal and nonpersonal interpretation services) at a popular tourist destination in Taiwan. Major findings include: (a) ¡§work attitude¡¨, ¡§basic employability skills¡¨, ¡§theories of interpretation education¡¨, ¡§field work of interpretation knowledge¡¨, ¡§preparation and planning of interpretation¡¨, ¡§skills and training of interpretation¡¨, ¡§research ability¡¨, and ¡§handling emergency situation¡¨ were recognized as the important competency categories for a competent heritage interpreter, (b) training courses identified by heritage interpreters and hospitality educators could be categorized into the following categories: professional knowledge, interpretation techniques, related regulations, safety and emergency handling, on-site training, and (c) tourists had positive responses to both personal and non-personal interpretive services; however, as the availability of the personal interpretive services were limited, tourists selected non-personal interpretive services while they visited the site to obtain the information. The findings of the studies may contribute to interpreters¡¦ training and to the tourism industry in general. The outcomes of the study identified competencies that would serve as the basis toward developing an effective interpretation training curriculum that can improve heritage interpreters¡¦ training in Taiwan. In addition, the findings may motivate interpreters to seek professional development opportunities in the future. Tourists would benefit from the quality interpretation services offered by the interpreters who have received competency-based training programs derivate from this study. Managerial implications and suggestions for future research directions were included. Advisors/Committee Members: Wu, Chih-Kang (Committee Chair), Felstehausen, Ginny (Committee Chair), Couch, Sue (committee member), Taylor, Leslee (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Heritage interpreter; Heritage tourism; Competency

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cheng, S. (2005). An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in taiwan. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/17017

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cheng, Shu-yun. “An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in taiwan.” 2005. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/17017.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cheng, Shu-yun. “An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in taiwan.” 2005. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Cheng S. An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in taiwan. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2005. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/17017.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cheng S. An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in taiwan. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/17017

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas Tech University

2. Cheng, Shu-yun. An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in Taiwan.

Degree: Family and Consumer Sciences Education, 2006, Texas Tech University

The purposes of this study were to (a) establish conceivable indexes for professional competencies of heritage interpreters, (b) evaluate the existing training curriculum of heritage interpreters, and (c) examine the impacts of interpretation services on tourists' satisfaction at a tourist destination. Based on these specific objectives, three distinct studies were conducted. The first study aimed to identify interpreters' competencies through a self-reported survey obtained from the groups of heritage interpreters, hospitality educator, students, and tourists at the heritage sites. The second study summarized the opinions of interpreters and hospitality educators concerning an active interpretation-training curriculum. The third study examined the differences in satisfaction levels regarding tourists who received interpretation services (personal and nonpersonal interpretation services) at a popular tourist destination in Taiwan. Major findings include: (a) "work attitude", "basic employability skills", "theories of interpretation education", "field work of interpretation knowledge", "preparation and planning of interpretation", "skills and training of interpretation", "research ability", and "handling emergency situation" were recognized as the important competency categories for a competent heritage interpreter, (b) training courses identified by heritage interpreters and hospitality educators could be categorized into the following categories: professional knowledge, interpretation techniques, related regulations, safety and emergency handling, on-site training, and (c) tourists had positive responses to both personal and non-personal interpretive services; however, as the availability of the personal interpretive services were limited, tourists selected non-personal interpretive services while they visited the site to obtain the information. The findings of the studies may contribute to interpreters' training and to the tourism industry in general. The outcomes of the study identified competencies that would serve as the basis toward developing an effective interpretation training curriculum that can improve heritage interpreters' training in Taiwan. In addition, the findings may motivate interpreters to seek professional development opportunities in the future. Tourists would benefit from the quality interpretation services offered by the interpreters who have received competency-based training programs derivate from this study. Managerial implications and suggestions for future research directions were included. Advisors/Committee Members: Felstehausen, Ginny (Committee Chair), Wu, Chih-Kang (Committee Chair), Couch, Sue (committee member), Taylor, Leslee (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Heritage tourism; Competency; Heritage interpreter

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cheng, S. (2006). An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in Taiwan. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/1076

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cheng, Shu-yun. “An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in Taiwan.” 2006. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/1076.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cheng, Shu-yun. “An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in Taiwan.” 2006. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Cheng S. An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in Taiwan. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/1076.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cheng S. An evaluation of heritage tourism interpretation services in Taiwan. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/1076

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Isakson, Su K. Heritage signers: language profile questionnaire.

Degree: MA, 2016, Western Oregon University

The instruction of American Sign Language historically has employed a foreign language pedagogy; however, research has shown foreign language teaching methods do not address the distinct pedagogical needs of heritage language learners. Framing deaf-parented individuals as heritage language learners capitalizes on the wealth of research on heritage speakers, particularly of Spanish. This study seeks to address three issues. First, it seeks to ascertain whether the assessment instrument developed successfully elicits pedagogically relevant data from deaf-parented individuals that frames them as heritage language learners of ASL. Second, it seeks to draw similarities between the experiences of deaf-parented individuals in the United States and heritage speakers of spoken languages such as Spanish. Third, after considering the first two, it addresses the question of whether deaf-parented individuals may therefore benefit from the pedagogical theory of heritage language learners. Using quantitative and qualitative methodologies, an assessment instrument was distributed to individuals over 18 years of age, who were raised by at least one deaf parent and had used and or understood signed language to any degree of fluency. This study seeks to test the soundness of the instrument’s design for use with the deaf-parented population. A review of participant responses and the literature highlights similarities in the experiences of heritage speakers and deaf-parented individuals, gesturing toward the strong possibility that deaf-parented individuals should be considered heritage language learners where ASL is concerned. The pedagogy used with deaf-parented individuals therefore should adapt the theories and practices used with heritage speakers. Advisors/Committee Members: Amanda R. Smith, Kara Gournaris, Maribel Gárate.

Subjects/Keywords: American Sign Language; Heritage Sign Language Learner; Deaf-Parented Interpreter; Ethnolinguistic Identity; Social and Linguistic Security; Assessment; Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education; Curriculum and Instruction; Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research; Educational Methods; First and Second Language Acquisition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Isakson, S. K. (2016). Heritage signers: language profile questionnaire. (Masters Thesis). Western Oregon University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.wou.edu/theses/27

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Isakson, Su K. “Heritage signers: language profile questionnaire.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Western Oregon University. Accessed September 19, 2020. https://digitalcommons.wou.edu/theses/27.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Isakson, Su K. “Heritage signers: language profile questionnaire.” 2016. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Isakson SK. Heritage signers: language profile questionnaire. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Oregon University; 2016. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wou.edu/theses/27.

Council of Science Editors:

Isakson SK. Heritage signers: language profile questionnaire. [Masters Thesis]. Western Oregon University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wou.edu/theses/27

.