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You searched for subject:(Hemispatial Neglect). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Wahlberg, Andrea Christine. Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury.

Degree: PhD, School Psychology, 2014, Texas A&M University

Visuospatial neglect (VSN), the failure to report, respond, or orient to novel or meaningful visual stimuli presented in a specific location, is a frequently occurring outcome following stroke. VSN can negatively impact the functions of daily life and is an important predictor for long term outcomes. The phenomenon is frequently studied in adult populations; however, the nature and incidence of VSN following childhood stroke is virtually unknown. Current research investigating the neuroanatomical correlates of VSN and hypothesized models of dysfunction all assume a fully mature brain and thus lack a developmental perspective. Similarly, current neuropsychological measures used to assess VSN are almost exclusively developed and normed with adult populations. While some individual adult tests have been modified for use with children, no standardized battery to assess VSN in young children currently exists. The present study investigated the reliability and validity of a five-task neuropsychological testing battery, the Pediatric Visuospatial Neglect Battery, developed at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) to assess VSN in young children ages 2-6 following stroke. Although there were some exceptions, the reliability estimates of task scores obtained from the present sample were generally low. With regard to criterion-related validity, sensitivity to detect brain injury was generally poor while specificity was high. Some of the low reliability and validity estimates were due to measurement problems of the calculated variables. These variables can be reexamined and likely improved in future studies. In other instances, modifications to the tasks are recommended. Specific recommendations for improving the five existing tasks are provided as well as suggestions for additional tasks that could potentially be added to the battery in future administrations. Although somewhat disappointing, low initial reliability and validity estimates are part and parcel to test development. This study represents an important first step in developing a standardized battery to detect VSN in children. With refinement and additional testing, the Pediatric Visuospatial Neglect Battery may soon become an excellent instrument for investigating the VSN phenomenon in children. Advisors/Committee Members: Riccio, Cynthia (advisor), Rae, William (committee member), Yoon, Myeongsun (committee member), Wilcox, Teresa (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Visuospatial Neglect; Unilateral Neglect; Visual Neglect; Hemispatial Neglect; Visual Inattention; Neglect; Brain Injury; Stroke; Pediatric Stroke; Pediatric Brain Injury; Childhood Stroke; Neuropsychology; Neuropsychological Assessment; Psychological Assessment; Assessment; Pediatric Visuospatial Neglect Battery; Line Bisection; Cancellation; Visual Search; Extinction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wahlberg, A. C. (2014). Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153250

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wahlberg, Andrea Christine. “Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153250.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wahlberg, Andrea Christine. “Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury.” 2014. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Wahlberg AC. Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153250.

Council of Science Editors:

Wahlberg AC. Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153250

2. Beatrice, David W. On the Automation of Clinical Treatment for Hemispatial Neglect.

Degree: MS, Engineering and Applied Science: Computer Engineering, 2017, University of Cincinnati

Stroke imposes growing economic costs on the United States each on the order of billions of dollars. Many of the costs associated with stroke result from the long-term disabilities a stroke incident often entails. Researchers have thoroughly explored the use of robotics and virtual reality for treating stroke victims to provide more precision, repeatability, and data capture than conventional methods. However, increasing demand for stroke-related rehabilitation creates an impetus for exploring robotics and virtual reality in rehabilitation for the sake of automation and patient independence; automating some or all of the treatment process may reduce the burden on healthcare professionals, lowering the overall cost of treatment. Furthermore, recent initiatives to commoditize virtual and augmented reality have produced compelling technologies that make the abstract notion of independent and personalized treatment systems more concrete. Concretely, this project explores the problem of formalizing and implementing the rehabilitation process for sensory-motor and visual neglect (a particular post-stroke condition) as an automated system. We first reviewed conventional methods for treating neglect, as well as research on the application of robotics and virtual reality to post-stroke rehabilitation. Next, we developed a set of engineering requirements for the project based on safety, existing treatment methods, data capture, and usability. The solution system is designed as software to run on the BKIN KINARM system; a robotic and virtual reality platform designed for neuroscientific research. We then designed an implemented a set of assessment and treatment exercises based on an analysis of conventional methods, an analysis of the host platforms capabilities, and ongoing consultation with healthcare professionals. In addition to the treatment system, we addressed the problem of patient evaluation and monitoring by developing a browser-based data platform for viewing time-series metrics computed from the KINARM’s sensor data. The metrics are designed based on a review and analysis of conventional methods for evaluating progress in stroke rehabilitation. Preliminary data was obtained over a five week treatment and follow-up case study with a stroke patient. The case study data set provides no bases for evaluating the effectiveness of the system for treating neglect. However, it does provide insights around the feasibility of the experimental system, as well as suggestions for refining the research problem and designing future experiments. The data suggests the potential for countering behavioral biases using virtual effects. It also raises questions about the role of subject motivation in producing good rehabilitation outcomes. Final recommendations include redirecting future research away from the exercise-oriented, iterative model of rehabilitation, toward the implicit approach of using virtual effects to counter behavioral biases and re-train during the patient’s normal daily activates. Advisors/Committee Members: Beyette, Fred (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Robots; KINARM; neglect; rehabilitation; rehab; hemispatial neglect; robot

…problem by restricting the project to addressing hemispatial neglect; a specific post-stroke… …discusses conclusions and further research. 1.2. Refining the Scope: Hemispatial Neglect 11… …forms of hemispatial neglect. 1.2.1. What is Hemispatial Neglect? When a stroke event causes a… …Appropriately, the condition is named hemispatial neglect to emphasis the one-sided awareness deficit… …synonymous with: hemispatial neglect, hemi-inattention, hemisensory neglect, hemineglect)… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Beatrice, D. W. (2017). On the Automation of Clinical Treatment for Hemispatial Neglect. (Masters Thesis). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1493714864910854

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Beatrice, David W. “On the Automation of Clinical Treatment for Hemispatial Neglect.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Cincinnati. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1493714864910854.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Beatrice, David W. “On the Automation of Clinical Treatment for Hemispatial Neglect.” 2017. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Beatrice DW. On the Automation of Clinical Treatment for Hemispatial Neglect. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2017. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1493714864910854.

Council of Science Editors:

Beatrice DW. On the Automation of Clinical Treatment for Hemispatial Neglect. [Masters Thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1493714864910854

3. Smith, Austen K 1986-. THE INFLUENCE OF SPATIAL LATERAL BIASES AND NATIVE READING DIRECTION ON DRIVING AND AESTHETIC PREFERENCES.

Degree: 2019, University of Saskatchewan

The neglect of leftward space occurring after a right parietal lesion, known as hemispatial neglect, results in a rightward spatial bias. Neurotypical individuals display an opposite leftward spatial bias, known as pseudoneglect (Bowers & Heilman, 1980). The leftward lighting bias and the leftward aesthetic preference are hypothesized to be related to pseudoneglect (Smith & Elias, 2018). Leftward biases are attenuated, or even flipped to the right in certain circumstances, notably in participants whose native reading direction (NRD) moves from right-to-left (RTL) and when spatial tasks occur in extrapersonal space. Aesthetic preferences and spatial abilities were compared between RTL and left-to-right (LTR) groups in an image rating task using eye tracking (Chapter 2) and image lighting tasks of three-dimensional (3D) images of sculptures (Chapter 3) and two-dimensional (2D) images of abstract paintings (Chapter 4). Participants’ basic spatial ability was assessed using the greyscales task (Mattingley, Bradshaw, Nettleton, & Bradshaw, 1994), a measure of perceptual asymmetries. LTR and RTL participants show clearly diverging trends of behaviour when making aesthetic judgments. When examining 2D images in Chapter 2 and illuminating 2D images in Chapter 4, preferences were leftward among LTRs and rightward among RTLs, however, both groups demonstrated a consistent leftward bias on the greyscales task. In Chapter 3, similar group differences between professionals in LTR and RTL regions were found for sculpture lighting, but participants illuminating 3D sculpture images did not show any light placement biases. In Chapter 4, a rudimentary version of a virtual mapping technique known as Halos (Baudisch & Rosenholtz, 2003) was carried out in a procedurally similar way to the artwork lighting task of the same chapter but measured spatial abilities rather than aesthetic preferences. Contrary to predictions, smaller errors were made when estimating the size of halos on the right, and as circle size increased estimation accuracy decreased. Studies in Chapter 5 examined navigation spatial abilities when driving, experimentally using a driving simulation, and through the analysis of naturalistic data from the Strategic Highway Research Program Naturalistic Driving Study (SHRP 2 NDS). Lane deviations were rightward, and collisions were more frequent and severe on the right side in the simulation and naturalistic data analysis revealed greater likelihoods of collisions from crossing over the right line or edge of the road and when making a right turn. Overall, findings suggest that an RTL NRD and task complexity modulate pseudoneglect and that lateral spatial biases when driving are in line with previous lateral bumping when walking results. Across all studies, findings provide clarity about the occurrence leftward bias attenuation. Advisors/Committee Members: Elias, Lorin, Borowsky, Ron, Loehr, Janeen, Gutwin, Carl, Campbell, Jamie.

Subjects/Keywords: neglect; hemispatial neglect; pseudoneglect; leftward bias; spatial bias; lighting bias; aesthetics; aesthetic preference; driving; driving simulation; navigation; navigation spatial abilities; native reading direction; right to left reading direction

…dimensional – 2D xi CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION The hallmark deficit of hemispatial neglect, often… …referred to as neglect, is the inattention to leftward space. Neglect results from damage to the… …understanding both the inattention of leftward space by neglect patients and the overestimation of… …hemisphere, especially the frontoparietal network of attention structures, results in neglect of… …any left visual field blindness in neglect patients, and they can, in certain circumstances… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, A. K. 1. (2019). THE INFLUENCE OF SPATIAL LATERAL BIASES AND NATIVE READING DIRECTION ON DRIVING AND AESTHETIC PREFERENCES. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12157

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Austen K 1986-. “THE INFLUENCE OF SPATIAL LATERAL BIASES AND NATIVE READING DIRECTION ON DRIVING AND AESTHETIC PREFERENCES.” 2019. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12157.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Austen K 1986-. “THE INFLUENCE OF SPATIAL LATERAL BIASES AND NATIVE READING DIRECTION ON DRIVING AND AESTHETIC PREFERENCES.” 2019. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Smith AK1. THE INFLUENCE OF SPATIAL LATERAL BIASES AND NATIVE READING DIRECTION ON DRIVING AND AESTHETIC PREFERENCES. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12157.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Smith AK1. THE INFLUENCE OF SPATIAL LATERAL BIASES AND NATIVE READING DIRECTION ON DRIVING AND AESTHETIC PREFERENCES. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12157

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.