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You searched for subject:(Growth spurts). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Jones, James Daniel. Effectiveness of CVM-Based Treatment Timing in Changing Facial Bone Size and Position in Class II Patients.

Degree: MS, Dental Sciences - Dentistry, 2008, University of Florida

The purpose of this study was to evaluate skeletal differences in class II patients whose orthodontic therapy was begun during, or outside of, CVM stage 3. Retrospectively, all cephalometric radiographs for all subjects involved in the University of Florida Class II clinical trial were staged using the latest version of the CVM method. First, reliability testing was conducted. CVM, hand-wrist, age, and weight correlations with statural height were then made. Due to an inability to reliably place an individual in stage 3 at a single timepoint, and due to the stringent requirements of longitudinal data acquisition necessary for a growth study of this nature, relatively small sample sizes for the desired comparisons were acquired. Five sets of reliability tests, spanning 12 months time, were necessary to achieve acceptable standards of intra-examiner reliability. Several modifications to the existing method were necessary for reliable and consistent staging, including the addition of ?half-stages?, i.e. ?2.5? or ?3.5.? CVM stage 3 could be identified in only 28% of subjects, and often stage 3 lasted for more than one year. CVM stage correlated significantly with statural height at all timepoints before the end of Phase II, but it did not correlate better than hand-wrist or even age. Class II patients starting treatment in stages 2.5 or 3 did not show ultimate skeletal improvement over those starting treatment in a stage other than 2.5 or 3. Placing every individual in CVM stage 3 with consistency and accuracy is not possible. CVM may be useful in providing a general estimation of growth remaining, but it may not be any more accurate than an estimation based on age and sex. This fact aside, basing treatment timing decisions on CVM stage 3 does not seem to change the ultimate sizes or locations of facial bones in Class II patients. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Wheeler, Timothy T. (committee chair), Dolce, Calogero (committee member), McGorray, Susan P. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Bones; Calibration; Cervical vertebrae; Concavity; Facial bones; Growth spurts; Household appliances; Mandible; Orthods; Skull base; cervical, cvm, growth, maturation, predictor, skeletal, spurt, timing, treatment, vertebral

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, J. D. (2008). Effectiveness of CVM-Based Treatment Timing in Changing Facial Bone Size and Position in Class II Patients. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022206

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, James Daniel. “Effectiveness of CVM-Based Treatment Timing in Changing Facial Bone Size and Position in Class II Patients.” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed April 14, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022206.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, James Daniel. “Effectiveness of CVM-Based Treatment Timing in Changing Facial Bone Size and Position in Class II Patients.” 2008. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Jones JD. Effectiveness of CVM-Based Treatment Timing in Changing Facial Bone Size and Position in Class II Patients. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022206.

Council of Science Editors:

Jones JD. Effectiveness of CVM-Based Treatment Timing in Changing Facial Bone Size and Position in Class II Patients. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022206


SUNY College at Brockport

2. Westcott, Deborah B. A Longitudinal Study Investigating the Brain Spurts Theory.

Degree: MSEd, Education and Human Development, 1991, SUNY College at Brockport

This longitudinal study investigates brain growth periodization, also known as the brain spurts theory. The theory calls for maximum brain growth between the ages 2-4 years, 6-8 years, 10-12 years, and 14-16 years. For several decades researchers have observed fluctuations in the rate of growth for various areas of student achievement. These fluctuations occur in an extreme form from ages 8 - 14. The brain spurts theory asserts that there is also variation during this period in the rate of brain cell development. This researcher utilized a random sample of 50 students in a western New York school district where data was available for their scaled achievement scores on the Stanford Achievement Test battery. The sampled students come from both rural and suburban areas. They were all in the same grade level at the time of the study. The basic purpose of this study was to see if there was an explanatory fit between the fluctuations asserted by the brain spurts theory and the fluctuations observed in achievement scores for this sample. An ancillary question that was investigated was whether or not a significant difference in mean performance existed between males and females on each of the sub-tests on the Stanford Achievement Test battery. Since this was a pilot descriptive investigation, the 90% confidence level was chosen as the level at which to test the significance of the difference between two independent group means. The decision to include this ancillary question also lead to stratifying the random sample of 25 males and 25 females. Male/female comparisons were made using a 2-sample t-test. The scaled scores of the Math Application, Math Computation, Reading Comprehension, and Vocabulary portions of the Stanford Achievement Tests were used. A data base was created and all of the statistics utilized in this study were computed using the computer statistical package GB-Stat by Dynamic Microsystems, Inc. Graphs on growth for ages 8 - 14 were completed. The coefficients of determination were also computed. Inconclusive evidence was found to either support or oppose the above stated theory. Inconsistencies were found in the growth patterns of the four areas tested. Two basically matched the growth pattern of the brain spurts theory and two did not. Possibilities for the inconsistencies are discussed in the conclusion. It was found that the best coefficient of determination value for the scores achieved at 14 years was at an age level which was at the same point in the growth pattern of the brain spurts theory. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Robert B. Ribble.

Subjects/Keywords: Brain spurts theory; growth patterns; brain development; achievement scores; Stanford Achievement Tests; Education; Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research; Language and Literacy Education; Other Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Westcott, D. B. (1991). A Longitudinal Study Investigating the Brain Spurts Theory. (Thesis). SUNY College at Brockport. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/ehd_theses/1196

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Westcott, Deborah B. “A Longitudinal Study Investigating the Brain Spurts Theory.” 1991. Thesis, SUNY College at Brockport. Accessed April 14, 2021. https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/ehd_theses/1196.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Westcott, Deborah B. “A Longitudinal Study Investigating the Brain Spurts Theory.” 1991. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Westcott DB. A Longitudinal Study Investigating the Brain Spurts Theory. [Internet] [Thesis]. SUNY College at Brockport; 1991. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/ehd_theses/1196.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Westcott DB. A Longitudinal Study Investigating the Brain Spurts Theory. [Thesis]. SUNY College at Brockport; 1991. Available from: https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/ehd_theses/1196

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.