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You searched for subject:(Green Burial). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Manitoba

1. Sawatzky, Erin Leanne. Death perception: envisioning a cemetery landscape for the 21st century.

Degree: Landscape Architecture, 2009, University of Manitoba

This practicum, "Death Perception: Envisioning a cemetery landscape for the 21st century", is a proposal for an alternative cemetery landscape, responding to changes in Western culture. An investigation into the historical, sociological and psychological evolution of Western society’s culture of death followed. Discerned patterns and conclusions were supplemented by sociological research and select interviews with professionals, regarding 20th century Western customs for dying, death and bereavement. The conclusions stemming from this research were then assessed for their implications regarding the landscape, particularly that of the cemetery. Cultural theory was translated into a culturally responsive landscape through further research regarding landscape theories and precedents of therapeutic landscapes, where people connect with nature, themselves and humanity. This research has informed a landscape design for Winnipeg, Manitoba that anticipates and responds to the emerging needs of the dying, the bereaved and the funerary industry of contemporary society. Advisors/Committee Members: Tate, Alan (Landscape Architecture) (supervisor), Wilson Baptist, Karen (Landscape Architecture) MacKendrick, Kenneth (Religion) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: landscape; cemetery; death; green burial

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APA (6th Edition):

Sawatzky, E. L. (2009). Death perception: envisioning a cemetery landscape for the 21st century. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/3196

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sawatzky, Erin Leanne. “Death perception: envisioning a cemetery landscape for the 21st century.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/3196.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sawatzky, Erin Leanne. “Death perception: envisioning a cemetery landscape for the 21st century.” 2009. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sawatzky EL. Death perception: envisioning a cemetery landscape for the 21st century. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/3196.

Council of Science Editors:

Sawatzky EL. Death perception: envisioning a cemetery landscape for the 21st century. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/3196


University of Washington

2. Lott, Olivia Katharine. Give Me A Clean Death | Rethinking Our Modern Death-Care System.

Degree: 2021, University of Washington

Thousands of tons of carcinogenic chemicals are interred in the ground every year by the modern death care industry in the United States alone. We, as a modern society, have also collectively chosen to relegate the spaces that our dead occupy, sequestering death to hospitals, funeral parlors and cemeteries, consequently removing it, as a concept, from public view. Much of our death care infrastructure is out of sight and out of mind. Simultaneously, we are running out of space to house our dead. This thesis urges that we rethink how we choose to approach the death-care industry, repurposing neglected, non-functional spaces within our urban fabric as modern cemeteries, columbariums and memorials. Why expend resources erecting new structures, when our cities already encompass so many abandoned and neglected spaces that are already interwoven into the historic palimpsest of our urban metropolises? Repurposing historical structures that are no longer serving their original function has been steadily gaining popularity within the field of historic preservation. Why not expand how we choose to repurpose such structures, to encompass a function as integral to our society-at-large as how we choose to care for our deceased? In this thesis, I propose the adaptive reuse of a defunct industrial site along the city of Bellingham’s downtown waterfront into a functioning death-care site and public park. Advisors/Committee Members: Manzo, Lynne C. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Bio-Cremation; Cemetery; Death; Green Burial; Human Composting; Natural Burial; Landscape architecture; Environmental education; American history; Landscape architecture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lott, O. K. (2021). Give Me A Clean Death | Rethinking Our Modern Death-Care System. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46821

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lott, Olivia Katharine. “Give Me A Clean Death | Rethinking Our Modern Death-Care System.” 2021. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46821.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lott, Olivia Katharine. “Give Me A Clean Death | Rethinking Our Modern Death-Care System.” 2021. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Lott OK. Give Me A Clean Death | Rethinking Our Modern Death-Care System. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2021. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46821.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lott OK. Give Me A Clean Death | Rethinking Our Modern Death-Care System. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2021. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46821

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Knigge, Kerri. Porter’s Bar: A Coastal Middle Woodland Burial Mound and Shell Midden in Northwest Florida.

Degree: 2018, University of South Florida

This thesis should serve as a comprehensive site report for both Porter’s Bar (8Fr1) and Green Point (8Fr11) mounds in northwest Florida. These prehistoric burial mounds and their associated village shell midden are determined to have been constructed during two different time periods, Middle Woodland and Early Woodland, respectively. This is the first time that all materials and data have been described and compiled for both sites, despite the fact that they were both originally recorded over a century ago and described differently later by multiple researchers. The mounds served as an important ceremonial center along Apalachicola Bay some 1500 years ago, beginning perhaps during the Early Woodland (1200 B.C. – A.D. 250) and continuing through the Middle Woodland (A.D. 250 – A.D. 650). Evidence indicates an earlier Late Archaic component, and a much later historic nineteenth-century component. People living here probably experienced slightly different coastlines as sea levels fluctuated. The village midden associated with the two mounds extends for nearly 300 meters along the bay shore and has been damaged by sea-level change, while other parts have been borrowed for road material. The mounds have been damaged by looting and residential construction. All known materials and data from the two sites are presented and compared, including burial styles and associated funerary goods. Ceramic types and tempers indicate that Green Point mound was one of the few built during the Early Woodland known in the region. The same population may have constructed Porter’s Bar during Middle Woodland times, perhaps a century or two later, and included artifacts that are rarely found in the research area. Potential areas of further investigation are noted, but time is limited as the midden will probably be inundated within the next fifty years.

Subjects/Keywords: Middle Woodland; burial mound; Swift Creek; early Weeden Island ceramics,; southeastern Native Americans; Green Point; History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

…Recovered from Green Point, Penton 1971 62 Table 5.1 Burial Type and Count 95 Table 5.2… …Shell Artifacts Recovered by Willey from Green Point Mound 122 Table 7.1 Diagnostic Ceramic… …boundary of 8Fr11 is more defined and could be the location of Green Point mound. Map courtesy of… …Jeff Du Vernay. 6 Figure 4. 6 Middle Woodland coastal burial mound and shell midden sites… …discussed in this thesis all fall within the red square. 8 Figure 5. Location of the six burial… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Knigge, K. (2018). Porter’s Bar: A Coastal Middle Woodland Burial Mound and Shell Midden in Northwest Florida. (Thesis). University of South Florida. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7181

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knigge, Kerri. “Porter’s Bar: A Coastal Middle Woodland Burial Mound and Shell Midden in Northwest Florida.” 2018. Thesis, University of South Florida. Accessed April 17, 2021. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7181.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knigge, Kerri. “Porter’s Bar: A Coastal Middle Woodland Burial Mound and Shell Midden in Northwest Florida.” 2018. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Knigge K. Porter’s Bar: A Coastal Middle Woodland Burial Mound and Shell Midden in Northwest Florida. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7181.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Knigge K. Porter’s Bar: A Coastal Middle Woodland Burial Mound and Shell Midden in Northwest Florida. [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2018. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7181

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.