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You searched for subject:(Grassroots support). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Minnesota

1. Dousa, Patrik Michal. Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations.

Degree: 2012, University of Minnesota

University of Minnesota M.S. thesis. December 2012. Major: Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy. Advisor: Kathryn Quick, M.C.P., Ph.D., 1 computer file (PDF); vii, 88 pages, appendices A-B.

This thesis explores how Actor-Network Theory (ANT) can be used to analyze the activities of Grassroots Support Organizations (GSOs) operating within the sphere of social justice development work. Specifically, the ANT concepts of translation, actor as intermediary vs. mediator, and cartography of controversies are used to delineate the work that GSOs perform. Data from case studies of four active GSOs are used to identify and illustrate three major mediating activities that GSOs perform in connecting top-level funders and grassroots groups. These activities are: cultural liasonship, partner networking, and resource transmission. The research delves specifically into the issues behind the creation and maintenance of development actor-networks consisting of toplevel funders, grassroots organizations, and GSOs in which the GSOs play a connective role. Four primary disparity boundaries between top-level funders and grassroots organizations that GSOs must effectively bridge are identified and investigated. These are compensation, organizational structure, access to technology, and privilege. The influence of the development paradigms of participatory development, the human capabilities approach, human rights framework, and neoliberalism on actor-network negotiations is described. The paper suggests tools developed from ANT analysis that GSOs may use for reflexive analysis to increase internal capability regarding the performance mediating activities. These tools include actor-network mapping, resource flow mapping, and a cartography of controversies.

Subjects/Keywords: Actor-network theory; Capabilities approach; Grassroots support; Human Rights

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dousa, P. M. (2012). Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations. (Masters Thesis). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/143804

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dousa, Patrik Michal. “Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Minnesota. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/143804.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dousa, Patrik Michal. “Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations.” 2012. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Dousa PM. Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2012. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/143804.

Council of Science Editors:

Dousa PM. Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations. [Masters Thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2012. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/143804


University of Minnesota

2. Dousa, Patrik Michal. Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations.

Degree: MS, Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy, 2012, University of Minnesota

This thesis explores how Actor-Network Theory (ANT) can be used to analyze the activities of Grassroots Support Organizations (GSOs) operating within the sphere of social justice development work. Specifically, the ANT concepts of translation, actor as intermediary vs. mediator, and cartography of controversies are used to delineate the work that GSOs perform. Data from case studies of four active GSOs are used to identify and illustrate three major mediating activities that GSOs perform in connecting top-level funders and grassroots groups. These activities are: cultural liasonship, partner networking, and resource transmission. The research delves specifically into the issues behind the creation and maintenance of development actor-networks consisting of toplevel funders, grassroots organizations, and GSOs in which the GSOs play a connective role. Four primary disparity boundaries between top-level funders and grassroots organizations that GSOs must effectively bridge are identified and investigated. These are compensation, organizational structure, access to technology, and privilege. The influence of the development paradigms of participatory development, the human capabilities approach, human rights framework, and neoliberalism on actor-network negotiations is described. The paper suggests tools developed from ANT analysis that GSOs may use for reflexive analysis to increase internal capability regarding the performance mediating activities. These tools include actor-network mapping, resource flow mapping, and a cartography of controversies.

Subjects/Keywords: Actor-network theory; Capabilities approach; Grassroots support; Human Rights

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dousa, P. M. (2012). Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations. (Masters Thesis). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/143804

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dousa, Patrik Michal. “Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Minnesota. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/143804.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dousa, Patrik Michal. “Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations.” 2012. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Dousa PM. Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2012. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/143804.

Council of Science Editors:

Dousa PM. Using actor-network theory to enhance the mediating activities of grassroots support organizations. [Masters Thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2012. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/143804


University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet

3. Bangwanubusa, Theogene. Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda.

Degree: 2009, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet

This doctoral dissertation is concerned with identifying factors that are important in explaining popular support for genocidal violence in Rwanda. It focuses on former communes, Giti and Murambi, to investigate why Giti successfully resisted the genocidal violence, while Murambi fell prey to large-scale violence. It addresses the question of why such a phenomenon could occur, given that Giti and Murambi were allegedly homogenous on cultural and socio-economic grounds. The theoretical standpoint, according to which there is interplay between the top leaders, middle-range leaders and the grassroots leadership, to bring about social change, was empirically supported. Moreover, there is strong recognition that the middle-range level of leadership remains the most important catalyst for engaging the common citizenry in both peaceful and violent processes. The empirical findings establish that both the genocide, and the absence of genocidal violence, were attributable to actions of the then burgomasters (local leaders). In this respect, the study highlights a historical aspect of the non-violence and violence, respectively, in Giti and Murambi, identified to be the result of alternatively efficient and inefficient leadership. Efficiency and inefficiency were understood as an indication of a gap between the central and the local institutions that also depended upon how strong was the political network of the top-level of leadership. Therefore, the response to genocidal violence was strongly linked to the strength of the political network. Referring to a weak political network, the case of Giti showed that the top-down style of command does not necessarily translate the will of the elite and, hence, of the common citizenry under their leadership. In this respect, the study highlights the crucial role that the informal elite played, particularly in Giti, to translate this will. The pattern of popular behavior in Giti led to the conclusion that vertical powers between the intermediate leaders and the common citizenry are a necessary condition for popular support, but are not of themselves sufficient. To expect popular support, the empirical findings established, grassroots thinking is a strong base from which ordinary people might transform into violent or non-violent agents. Grassroots thinking drove the perceptions and a set of shared beliefs about the ‘other’ until it led to the dichotomy of identity into ‘us’ and ‘them’ (or polarized ethnic relations) in Murambi, and to the mixed ethnic relations in Giti. As a result of popular support, the material showed that the middle-range leadership had ascendancy over the common citizenry with which it identified. This was an indication of a meeting point between the middle-range leaders and the common citizenry, whereby a minimum level of shared grassroots thinking drives the interactions in a mutually accepted direction.

Subjects/Keywords: Popular support; Obedience; Genocidal violence; Grassroots thinking; Elite; Informal elite; Social power; Ordinary people; War-displaced people; Immigration; Social taboo; Social pact; Mixed ethnic relations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bangwanubusa, T. (2009). Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda. (Thesis). University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bangwanubusa, Theogene. “Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda.” 2009. Thesis, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bangwanubusa, Theogene. “Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda.” 2009. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Bangwanubusa T. Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2009. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bangwanubusa T. Understanding the Polarization of Responses to Genocidal Violence in Rwanda. [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21470

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.