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You searched for subject:(GED Credential). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Eastern Michigan University

1. Voss, Janice Carol McCarthy. School attrition and dropout recovery ameliorated by literacy, engagement, and resilience.

Degree: PhD, Teacher Education, 2015, Eastern Michigan University

The purpose of this study was to investigate factors and feelings that contribute to students leaving school and later returning to adult education programs to attain a General Educational Development (GED) credential. This process was found to be ameliorated by the positive factors of literacy, engagement, and resilience. These factors were selected because of their importance to the success of the schooling process and their interrelatedness. When these factors were self-reported at low levels combined with negative social circumstances, it was much more difficult for students to avoid school attrition or to reengage in dropout recovery. An explanatory sequential mixed methods research design was employed with an emancipatory lens facilitated by a supportive listener, as researcher, to examine the voices of a disadvantaged population of high school dropouts who shared their educational journeys and reconnection to school. These personal reports were given through the use of the Survey of Adolescent Reading Attitudes (SARA), The Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ), and ethnographic interviews. Students felt that the inherent value of a high school credential was equally as important as the desire to garner employment. Literacy, they believed, was a protective factor as a skill that was an early-developed asset; however, that ability alone could not help them prevail in view of overwhelming personal roadblocks and ever increasing complex content material. Literacy skills did help reassure students of the possibility of success when finding a good dropout recovery program to obtain a GED. Students’ self-determination, through engagement and resilience, revealed an intrinsic feeling of wanting to reach the educational goal for “myself.” A significant link between reading attitudes and resilience was demonstrated in a correlation study with the two established assessment scales. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Linda Lewis-White: Chair, Dr. Paul Ramsey, Dr. Nancy Copeland.

Subjects/Keywords: Disadvantaged Populations; Dropout Recovery; GED; General Educational Development credential; Graduation Rate; High School Attrition; Education

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APA (6th Edition):

Voss, J. C. M. (2015). School attrition and dropout recovery ameliorated by literacy, engagement, and resilience. (Doctoral Dissertation). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/699

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Voss, Janice Carol McCarthy. “School attrition and dropout recovery ameliorated by literacy, engagement, and resilience.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed September 19, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/699.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Voss, Janice Carol McCarthy. “School attrition and dropout recovery ameliorated by literacy, engagement, and resilience.” 2015. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Voss JCM. School attrition and dropout recovery ameliorated by literacy, engagement, and resilience. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/699.

Council of Science Editors:

Voss JCM. School attrition and dropout recovery ameliorated by literacy, engagement, and resilience. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/699


Iowa State University

2. Ryder, Andrew Joseph. From dropout to degree: The GED pathway to and through Iowa community colleges.

Degree: 2011, Iowa State University

This study analyzed available individual-level data on the fiscal year 2004 cohort of Iowa GED candidates to identify demographic, economic, academic ability, and educational goal factors that predicted students' success from earning the GED to completing a community college credential. The theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985; Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975), persistence theory for adult learners (Bean & Metzner, 1985), and human capital theory (Becker, 1992; Schultz, 1961) supported a conceptual framework asserting that a positive GED experience, mediated by demographic, economic, and ability considerations, may contribute to increased aspirations toward additional schooling. Probit models were used to determine statistically significant predictors for earning the GED (e.g., age, Latino, Black, goal of earning GED), enrolling in community college (e.g., female, age, GED reading score, goal of attending college) and completing a community college credential (e.g., female, age, GED writing score, goal of transferring to a four-year institution). Discrete-time hazard analysis was used to model the conditional probabilities of credential completion from fiscal year 2004 to fiscal year 2009. The study represents a first-of-its kind analysis of GED students in the state of Iowa.

Subjects/Keywords: college enrollment; community college; credential completion; GED; Iowa; student attrition; Educational Administration and Supervision

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ryder, A. J. (2011). From dropout to degree: The GED pathway to and through Iowa community colleges. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10424

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ryder, Andrew Joseph. “From dropout to degree: The GED pathway to and through Iowa community colleges.” 2011. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed September 19, 2019. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10424.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ryder, Andrew Joseph. “From dropout to degree: The GED pathway to and through Iowa community colleges.” 2011. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Ryder AJ. From dropout to degree: The GED pathway to and through Iowa community colleges. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10424.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ryder AJ. From dropout to degree: The GED pathway to and through Iowa community colleges. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2011. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10424

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of New Mexico

3. Salazar, Elisabeth. CONTROL YOUR DESTINY OR SOMEONE ELSE WILL: THE VALUE OF THE GED.

Degree: Teacher Education, Educational Leadership & Policy, 2016, University of New Mexico

The purpose of this study was to explore the impact locus of control (LOC) had on the postsecondary achievement, as measured by self-reported GPA, of GED® recipients and traditional high school graduates (THSG) controlling for gender, race/ethnicity, and time in college. Data was collected from 767 GED® recipients and THSG enrolled in three postsecondary institutions in Northern New Mexico. LOC was assessed using the Adult Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Control Scale (Nowicki & Duke, 1974). The majority of respondents were Hispanic/Latino (47.34%) and Caucasian (37.34%). Responses were analyzed using Pearsons r. Although LOC did not contribute significantly to academic achievement as measured by self-reported GPA of GED® recipients and THSG, the findings supported previous claims that higher internality is associated with higher academic achievement. Self-reported GPA was considerably above average for students with higher internality, regardless of type of degree, gender, race/ethnicity or time in college. This study holds power in removing the GED® stigma. Students who complete the GED® and display high internality are just as likely to succeed in college as THSG. Policy makers and practitioners would be well advised to assess LOC and provide planned interventions to increase internality for students earlier in their school years. Future research may yield greater generalizability with a more representative sample size, consideration of multiple antecedents of locus of control, and collection of institutional data to confirm actual vs. self-reported GPA.' Advisors/Committee Members: Williams, Sheri, Chavez, Alicia, Woodrum, Arlie, Casey, Barbara.

Subjects/Keywords: GED Credential; GED diploma; traditional high school diploma; traditional high school students; Common Core State Standards; CCSS; College and Career Readiness; CCR; GED recipients; GED diploma; traditional high school graduates; Adult Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Control Scale; ANSIE; locus of control; LOC; internal locus of control; external locus of control; self-reported GPA; GPA; postsecondary academic achievement; GED stigma; antecedents of locus of control; actual versus self-reported GPA; dropouts; locus of control of reinforcement; locus of control and academic achievement; GED recipients; American Council on Education; GED Testing Service; high school seniors; Postsecondary Educational Outcomes; Attribution training; persuasion strategy; at-risk college students; self-assessment; college success; dropout rate; academic performance of GED recipients and traditional high school graduates

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Salazar, E. (2016). CONTROL YOUR DESTINY OR SOMEONE ELSE WILL: THE VALUE OF THE GED. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/31741

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Salazar, Elisabeth. “CONTROL YOUR DESTINY OR SOMEONE ELSE WILL: THE VALUE OF THE GED.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed September 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/31741.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Salazar, Elisabeth. “CONTROL YOUR DESTINY OR SOMEONE ELSE WILL: THE VALUE OF THE GED.” 2016. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Salazar E. CONTROL YOUR DESTINY OR SOMEONE ELSE WILL: THE VALUE OF THE GED. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/31741.

Council of Science Editors:

Salazar E. CONTROL YOUR DESTINY OR SOMEONE ELSE WILL: THE VALUE OF THE GED. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/31741

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