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You searched for subject:(Flexible ethnicity). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Barlok, Abby E. New Tools for Storytelling: Flexible Ethnicity and Adaptation in Comics & Television.

Degree: MA, American Studies, 2017, Lehigh University

This thesis examines different forms of storytelling by using graphic novels, comic books and television series to efficiently do so. The first chapter features a fairly new comic called Ms. Marvel where the superhero is a teenage Muslim instead of the traditional blue-eyed, blonde-haired superhero. The chapter describes Marvel Comics’ direction of changing ethnicity, sex, gender, etc. to better suit the vastly-growing and diverse consumer market. Chapter two concentrates on the tool of flashbacks in a comic called Bitch Planet and in a television show called Orange is the New Black. The use of flashbacks is investigated, further demonstrating its ability to humanize characters. Chapter three focuses on adaptation as a form, tracing its roots from creation to present-day. In the chapter, I discuss the call and current need for changes within adaptations. I also examine an original comic called Preacher, while also comparing it to the newly-finished TV series adaptation by the same name. Throughout the three chapters, portable ethnicity, flashbacks and adaptation are all a common theme and all play a part in the storytelling of these pieces. Advisors/Committee Members: Peterson, James B..

Subjects/Keywords: Adaptations; Comics; Flashbacks; Flexible ethnicity; Storytelling; Television; American Studies; Arts and Humanities

…Kamala Khan’s positive effect in present-day Portable and Flexible Ethnicity Marilyn Halter… …changing ethnicity, sex, gender, etc. to better suit the vastly-growing and diverse consumer… …Throughout the three chapters, portable ethnicity, flashbacks and adaptation are all a common theme… …and all play a part in the storytelling of these pieces. 1 Chapter One Flexible and… …Portable Ethnicity in Marvel Comics Marvel Comics’ recent development of a full slate of… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Barlok, A. E. (2017). New Tools for Storytelling: Flexible Ethnicity and Adaptation in Comics & Television. (Thesis). Lehigh University. Retrieved from https://preserve.lehigh.edu/etd/2505

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barlok, Abby E. “New Tools for Storytelling: Flexible Ethnicity and Adaptation in Comics & Television.” 2017. Thesis, Lehigh University. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://preserve.lehigh.edu/etd/2505.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barlok, Abby E. “New Tools for Storytelling: Flexible Ethnicity and Adaptation in Comics & Television.” 2017. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Barlok AE. New Tools for Storytelling: Flexible Ethnicity and Adaptation in Comics & Television. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lehigh University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://preserve.lehigh.edu/etd/2505.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Barlok AE. New Tools for Storytelling: Flexible Ethnicity and Adaptation in Comics & Television. [Thesis]. Lehigh University; 2017. Available from: https://preserve.lehigh.edu/etd/2505

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Ohio University

2. Ling, Hock Shen. Negotiating Malaysian Chinese Ethnic and National Identity Across Borders.

Degree: MA, Geography (Arts and Sciences), 2008, Ohio University

The transnational nature of Overseas Chinese who have migrated to Southeast Asia and experienced different levels of acculturation and/or assimilation has greatly convoluted their self-identification. With continued marginalization in the region, groups such as the Malaysian Chinese are (re) migrating to other countries as part of a “second wave diaspora,” which further complicates notions of their ethnic and national identities. This research investigates how place shapes and transforms the sense of ethnic and national identities among Malaysian Chinese by providing a comparison of how they identify themselves across borders in Malaysia and the US. A combination of surveys, personal interviews and archival research are employed to allow for a greater understanding of the factors that influence the way people identify themselves. Findings indicate that place plays a key role in shaping identity through sociopolitical conditions of “home” and their new host countries. The Malaysian Chinese were found to identify with their ethnicity more in Malaysia, but more with their nationality abroad. Advisors/Committee Members: Kim, Yeong-Hyun (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Geography; History; Social Research; Overseas Chinese; Chinese Diaspora; Malaysian Chinese; migration; transnationalism; identity; ethnicity; nationalism; flexible identities

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APA (6th Edition):

Ling, H. S. (2008). Negotiating Malaysian Chinese Ethnic and National Identity Across Borders. (Masters Thesis). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1226957088

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ling, Hock Shen. “Negotiating Malaysian Chinese Ethnic and National Identity Across Borders.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Ohio University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1226957088.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ling, Hock Shen. “Negotiating Malaysian Chinese Ethnic and National Identity Across Borders.” 2008. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ling HS. Negotiating Malaysian Chinese Ethnic and National Identity Across Borders. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Ohio University; 2008. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1226957088.

Council of Science Editors:

Ling HS. Negotiating Malaysian Chinese Ethnic and National Identity Across Borders. [Masters Thesis]. Ohio University; 2008. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1226957088

3. Hundle, Anneeth Kaur. The Politics of (In)security: Reconstructing African-Asian Relations, Citizenship and Community in Post-Expulsion Uganda.

Degree: PhD, Anthropology, 2013, University of Michigan

This dissertation explores the dynamics of geopolitical South-Southism and the possibilities and limits of renewed African-Asian relationships in contemporary Uganda. More specifically, I analyze processes of post-1990s Ugandan Asian and South Asian migration to Uganda and the re-integration of a South Asian racialized minority in President Museveni’s National Resistance Movement (NRM) national order. First, I demonstrate that contemporary Uganda is a historically and culturally specific space characterized by the intersection of Ugandan Asians who remained in the country after former President Idi Amin’s 1972 expulsion decree, Ugandan Asian returnees, and new economic migrants from the South Asian sub-continent. Through ethnographic and historical method, I utilize the analytics of citizenship, sovereignty, and security (as well as political economy, race, culture ethnicity, gender, and sexuality) to explore the lived experiences of Ugandan Asians who remained, Ugandan Asian “returnees,” and new South Asian migrants in Kampala. Oral history interviews with Ugandan Asians who remained in Idi Amin’s regime (1972-1979), research at the Uganda Investment Authority (UIA) in Kampala, ethnographic analysis of the politics of South Asian community-building, and an examination of the practices of Ugandan African and South Asian women as they respond to the increasing vulnerability of Indian women and their bodies—all of this material reveals historical transformations in South Asian inclusion and exclusion in Uganda and the multiple registers of racialized insecurity within which Ugandan Asians and new South Asian migrants are embedded. While the post-1990s state recognizes, legitimates, and manages South Asian presence in the country by constructing Ugandan Asians and South Asian migrants as “investors,” I show that South Asian women are rather invisible and unrecognized by emerging modes of neoliberal economic and security-oriented global and state governance. Furthermore, I argue that Ugandan Asians and South Asian migrants are engaged in a number of flexible securitization practices both in Uganda and in transnational contexts. These flexible securitization practices allow them to respond to the historical politics of racialized insecurity by enhancing their sense of personal, family, and community-based security. Advisors/Committee Members: Partridge, Damani James (committee member), Askew, Kelly M. (committee member), Peterson, Derek R. (committee member), Mir, Farina (committee member), Feeley-Harnik, Gillian (committee member), Diouf, Mamadou (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: African-Asian Relations and South-Southism; Post-Cold War State Sovereignty, Governance, and Citizenship in Africa; Ugandan Asian Expulsion and Asian Minorities in East Africa; Flexible Migrants in Africa; Racialized Insecurity and Securitization Practices; Migration, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality; African Studies; Anthropology and Archaeology; History (General); South Asian Languages and Cultures; Women's and Gender Studies; Social Sciences

…32 VIV. Colonial and Academic Legacies: Community, Race, Ethnicity and Gender ..36 VV… …238 V. From Formal to Flexible Citizenship… …Asians are engaged in “flexible citizenship” practices, in which their choices and strategies… …however, flexible citizenship practices among Ugandan Asians and new migrants are inflected by… …the historical politics of insecurity. Rather than flexible citizenship” practices, then, I… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hundle, A. K. (2013). The Politics of (In)security: Reconstructing African-Asian Relations, Citizenship and Community in Post-Expulsion Uganda. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97891

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hundle, Anneeth Kaur. “The Politics of (In)security: Reconstructing African-Asian Relations, Citizenship and Community in Post-Expulsion Uganda.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97891.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hundle, Anneeth Kaur. “The Politics of (In)security: Reconstructing African-Asian Relations, Citizenship and Community in Post-Expulsion Uganda.” 2013. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hundle AK. The Politics of (In)security: Reconstructing African-Asian Relations, Citizenship and Community in Post-Expulsion Uganda. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97891.

Council of Science Editors:

Hundle AK. The Politics of (In)security: Reconstructing African-Asian Relations, Citizenship and Community in Post-Expulsion Uganda. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97891

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