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You searched for subject:(Female Serial Killers). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Antioch University

1. Messori, Leryn Rose-Doggett. Frequencies Between Serial Killer Typology and Theorized Etiological Factors.

Degree: Psy. D., Antioch Santa Barbara: Clinical Psychology, 2016, Antioch University

This study examined the association between serial killer typologies and previously proposed etiological factors within serial killer case histories. Stratified sampling based on race and gender was used to identify thirty-six serial killers for this study. The percentage of serial killers within each race and gender category included in the study was taken from current serial killer demographic statistics between 1950 and 2010. Detailed data was gathered about each case, including past experiences and details of their crimes using publicly available primary and secondary source material. Etiological factors identified for this study include military experience, alcohol use, drug use, whether or not the subject was bullied as a child or sexually abused, whether they displayed assaultive behavior as an adolescent, whether they were physically abused by their maternal figure, and whether they had engaged in animal torture or engaged in fire setting in childhood or adolescence. The presence of these factors was coded dichotomously (present = 1; not present = 0) for each case history. Cases were then divided by inclusion in two typologies: the FBI’s organized/disorganized typology and Holmes, Holmes, and DeBurger’s intrinsic motivation typology. The etiological factors were examined for interrelatedness and prevalence in the designated serial killer typologies. Results of crosstabulations and chi-squared analysis showed that military experience was significantly associated with the organized/disorganized typology (p<.01). Thus, serial killers within the organized typology were more likely to have prior military experience, while those in the disorganized typology were not. No other statistically significant findings between etiological factors and serial killer typology were found. Statistical analyses indicated that there might be other associations between etiological factors, but not at a statistical significance level with this population size. Considerations for future research are discussed. The electronic version of this dissertation is available free at Ohiolink ETD Center, www.ohiolink.edu/etd Advisors/Committee Members: Pilato, Ron (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Criminology; Demographics; Psychology; Sociology; Serial Murder; Serial Killers; Bounded Case Study; Etiological Factors; Intrinsic Motivation; Typology; Organized; Disorganized; African American Serial Killers; Caucasian Serial Killers; Hispanic Serial Killers; Female Serial Killers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Messori, L. R. (2016). Frequencies Between Serial Killer Typology and Theorized Etiological Factors. (Doctoral Dissertation). Antioch University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1471990999

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Messori, Leryn Rose-Doggett. “Frequencies Between Serial Killer Typology and Theorized Etiological Factors.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Antioch University. Accessed March 21, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1471990999.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Messori, Leryn Rose-Doggett. “Frequencies Between Serial Killer Typology and Theorized Etiological Factors.” 2016. Web. 21 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Messori LR. Frequencies Between Serial Killer Typology and Theorized Etiological Factors. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Antioch University; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 21]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1471990999.

Council of Science Editors:

Messori LR. Frequencies Between Serial Killer Typology and Theorized Etiological Factors. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Antioch University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1471990999


George Mason University

2. Keya, Danielle Zohra. Female Serial Killers through a Sociological Lens .

Degree: 2013, George Mason University

It has been estimated that 12 to 15 percent of serial killers are female. Documented cases of serial murder committed by women date back thousands of years and have continued into the 21st century. The majority of studies conducted on and about serial killers have focused primarily on their male counterparts, due to the fact that men make up 85 to 88 percent of documented cases of serial murder. Many of the studies conducted have focused predominately on the mental, psychological, and physiological factors that may have caused or contributed to why they killed. This study examines ten of history’s most notorious female serial killers using the theories of sociologists Emile Durkheim and Robert K. Merton. The principles of Durkheim’s Anomie Theory and Merton’s Strain Theory have been selected as tools of analysis in helping to understand how a set of thirteen specific sociological factors may have contributed to causing these particular women to become serial killers. Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis, Rutledge (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: sociology/sociological; Robert K. Merton; female serial killers; Emile Durkheim; anomie theory; strain theory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Keya, D. Z. (2013). Female Serial Killers through a Sociological Lens . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/8466

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keya, Danielle Zohra. “Female Serial Killers through a Sociological Lens .” 2013. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed March 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/8466.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keya, Danielle Zohra. “Female Serial Killers through a Sociological Lens .” 2013. Web. 21 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Keya DZ. Female Serial Killers through a Sociological Lens . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/8466.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Keya DZ. Female Serial Killers through a Sociological Lens . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/8466

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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