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You searched for subject:(Farmer Field School). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Saskatchewan

1. Kayira, Jean. Re-Learning our Roots: Youth Participatory Research, Indigenous Knowledge, and Sustainability through Agriculture.

Degree: 2013, University of Saskatchewan

There has been an increasing realization of the significance of Indigenous knowledge (IK) in achieving sustainability. Education is also considered a primary agent in moving toward sustainability. However, research that explores education focused on sustainability in Malawi is sparse, especially where the roles of IK and youth perspectives have been considered. This research draws on the concepts of uMunthu, Sankofa, and postcolonial theory to enable a “third space” (Bhabha, 1994) centred on culturally appropriate Malawian ways of knowing working in tandem with non-Indigenous knowledge and practice. Three main questions guide the study: (1) How do participants understand place and environmental sustainability in relation to knowledge and practice (both Indigenous and non-Indigenous)?; (2) Within the context of Chinduzi village, the Junior Farmer Field and Life Skills School (JFFLS) program, and its engagement with issues of environmental sustainability, what forms of knowledge and practice are evident (both Indigenous and non-Indigenous)?; and (3) What are participants’ views on how environmental sustainability should be further engaged in the JFFLS program in relation to knowledge and practice (both Indigenous and non-Indigenous)? Data collection methods included focus groups, place mapping, individual conversations, observations, and archival documents review. The data were coded using inductive analysis and the research employed aspects of participatory research and Indigenous research methodologies. The research findings reveal that while there is general consensus among the participants supporting youth learning IK in school, others are not supportive because they consider IK to be inferior. In considering place and environmental sustainability, the findings revealed that participating Elders describe their sense of place in terms of historical agriculture-related knowledge and practice. On the other hand, participating youth express their sense of place in drawings of their favourite places. The drawings revealed that youth are largely rooted in their social-cultural interactions within their community, but also influenced by global culture. The study results show that the JFFLS curriculum includes both Indigenous and non-Indigenous knowledge and practice in both agriculture-related and life skills lessons. To achieve environmental sustainability in the community, participants recommend all youth in the community learn local Indigenous knowledge and practices for protecting the environment. Advisors/Committee Members: McKenzie, Marcia, Clark, Douglas, Lotz-Sistika, Heila, McVittie, Janet, Newenham-Kahindi, Aloysius, Settee, Priscilla.

Subjects/Keywords: Indigenous Knowledge; Junior farmer field and life skills school; Postcolonial theory; Sankofa; Sustainability; uMunthu

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APA (6th Edition):

Kayira, J. (2013). Re-Learning our Roots: Youth Participatory Research, Indigenous Knowledge, and Sustainability through Agriculture. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-08-1222

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kayira, Jean. “Re-Learning our Roots: Youth Participatory Research, Indigenous Knowledge, and Sustainability through Agriculture.” 2013. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-08-1222.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kayira, Jean. “Re-Learning our Roots: Youth Participatory Research, Indigenous Knowledge, and Sustainability through Agriculture.” 2013. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kayira J. Re-Learning our Roots: Youth Participatory Research, Indigenous Knowledge, and Sustainability through Agriculture. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-08-1222.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kayira J. Re-Learning our Roots: Youth Participatory Research, Indigenous Knowledge, and Sustainability through Agriculture. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-08-1222

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Tech

2. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Extension Methods and Programs: The Case of Bangladesh.

Degree: MS, Agricultural and Applied Economics, 2005, Virginia Tech

This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of alternative Integrated Pest Management (IPM) training methods and programs aimed at diffusing IPM innovations to farmers in Bangladesh. Various IPM innovations are categorized as being simple, intermediate or complex, while dissemination methods used to extend these innovations are classified as being less intense, moderately intense, or more intense. Examples of less intense diffusion methods include mass media and field day demonstrations, and moderately intense methods include visits from agents. A "farmer field school" (FFS) is considered a more intense type of training method. The study evaluates the effectiveness of these IPM diffusion methods based on a number of criteria such as a methods ability to reach the greatest number of farmers with a given budget, their capability of reaching farmers quickly, and their ability to influence adoption of IPM. Additional components of effectiveness include influencing appropriate use of IPM, influencing retention of IPM, providing a level knowledge that participants can adapt to other areas on the farm, and providing accessibility to limited resource farmers. Data used in the analysis come from a field survey conducted on 350 rice and vegetable farmers in Bangladesh during July and August of 2004. Three ordered probit models are used to measure adoption of simple, intermediate and complex technologies. Results from these models indicate that FFS participants are more likely than non-participants to adopt simple, intermediate and complex practices, while farmers visited by agents are more likely than non-participants to adopt simple and intermediate practices. Field day attendees are more likely to adopt intermediate and complex practices than non-participants. These results may be influenced by endogeneity of unobserved factors that influence participation in FFS but also affect adoption. The study uses a binary probit model to measure appropriate use, but it does not detect any significant differences among farmers trained through different methods, nor does it find any significant differences in retention rates among farmers who have been to different training programs. Another probit model identifies farmers who have been visited by an agent as being more likely to discover an IPM practice through their own experimentation, indicating that farmers who have been visited by an agent have received enough knowledge to adapt IPM to different problems on their farm. Results of the study indicate that limited resource farms are well represented by their participation in the various training methods, but that a higher percentage of large farmers than small farmers in the sample have been visited by an agent or been to FFS. Informal diffusion of IPM information is found to be occurring among people in FFS villages for simple practices. However, for intermediate and complex practices, farmers who participated in FFS are no more likely to spread information to other people in their villages than are less intense formal… Advisors/Committee Members: Norton, George W. (committeechair), Alwang, Jeffrey R. (committee member), Hilmer, Christiana E. (committee member), Rajotte, Edwin G. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: farmer field school; FFS; cost-effectiveness; integrated pest management; IPM; Bangladesh; extension; diffusion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ricker-Gilbert, J. (2005). Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Extension Methods and Programs: The Case of Bangladesh. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34681

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob. “Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Extension Methods and Programs: The Case of Bangladesh.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34681.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob. “Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Extension Methods and Programs: The Case of Bangladesh.” 2005. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Ricker-Gilbert J. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Extension Methods and Programs: The Case of Bangladesh. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2005. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34681.

Council of Science Editors:

Ricker-Gilbert J. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Extension Methods and Programs: The Case of Bangladesh. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34681

3. Carlberg, Eric Joseph. An economic evaluation of groundnut research in Uganda and Ghana.

Degree: MS, Agricultural Economics, 2012, University of Georgia

This thesis empirically examines the impact of agricultural groundnut research in Uganda and Ghana performed by the Peanut Collaborative Research Support Program (PCRSP), ICRISAT, NaSARRI, and CSIR-CRI. An ex-post economic surplus model is used to estimate consumer and producer benefits in Uganda from the adoption of improved groundnut varieties. In Ghana, this study evaluates the impact of Farmer Field School (FFS) on improving groundnut production by estimating the average treatment effect through the treatment effects model. Results indicate a positive effect at the national level in Uganda and household level in Ghana. Advisors/Committee Members: Genti Kostandini.

Subjects/Keywords: Agriculture; Evaluation; Impact; Groundnut; Ghana; Uganda; Economic Surplus; Farmer Field School; Treatment Effects; Selection Model

…51 Table 3.5: Ghana Farmer Field School Participation Probit… …of new information and technology throughout the region by farmer field school participants… …varieties in Uganda and Farmer Field Schools (FFS) in Ghana. 1.1.1 Peanut CRSP Uganda… …surplus in Uganda’s groundnut sector. (ii) Farmer Field Schools have a positive impact… …stage, information on groundnut lines tolerant to diseases and farmer practices in pest… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carlberg, E. J. (2012). An economic evaluation of groundnut research in Uganda and Ghana. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/carlberg_eric_j_201208_ms

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carlberg, Eric Joseph. “An economic evaluation of groundnut research in Uganda and Ghana.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/carlberg_eric_j_201208_ms.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carlberg, Eric Joseph. “An economic evaluation of groundnut research in Uganda and Ghana.” 2012. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Carlberg EJ. An economic evaluation of groundnut research in Uganda and Ghana. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/carlberg_eric_j_201208_ms.

Council of Science Editors:

Carlberg EJ. An economic evaluation of groundnut research in Uganda and Ghana. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2012. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/carlberg_eric_j_201208_ms

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