Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Farm of origin). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Kansas State University

1. Pozo, Veronica F. Consumer preferences for emerging trends in organics: product origin and scale of supply chain operations.

Degree: MS, Department of Agricultural Economics, 2009, Kansas State University

Notable changes are occurring in the U.S. organic food sector. First, the U.S. organic food system is increasingly relying on imports, because the expansion in the organic production has failed to satisfactorily meet the rapidly growing demand for organic foods. Second, the “locally grown” concept has become appealing to consumers, with some evidence of consumers switching from certified organic foods to local, conventional foods. Third, organic food has penetrated the mass-market channel, and organic foods are no longer being sold exclusively in natural product stores. And fourth, the social and environmental awareness among consumers is increasing. Thus, consumers are also willing to pay a price premium to support small farmers. To understand how these changes are affecting the demand for organic foods, this study used survey data to assess U.S. consumers‟ preferences for fresh organic apples that are sourced from various places and from supply chain operations that vary in scale. The survey was administered via the Internet to a random sample of 285 households across the U.S through a research company. Choice experiment was selected as the valuation method. Results indicate that among the levels of the location attributes, the “locally grown” label was associated with the highest average WTP. The “regionally grown” was the second most preferred, “U.S. grown” the third, and “imported” the least. The “locally grown” label was valued higher than the “certified organic label”. Also, consumers were willing to pay a higher value for apples produced on a small farm compared to those from a large farm. However, they did not distinguish the type of retail outlets where apples were offered. The analysis incorporating the effects of consumer characteristics suggest that the perceived importance of public benefits impacted the values of origin attributes more than the private ones; the type of retail outlet attributes became significant among certain gender and age segments; and the value of small farm attribute increased with consumers‟ income. Finally, results from a theoretical model suggest that the variability in the WTP obtained among the origin attributes could be explained by the reputation of product quality depending on their origin. Advisors/Committee Members: Hikaru H. PetersonAlexander E. Saak.

Subjects/Keywords: Organic food; Origin; Type of retail outlet; Size of farm; Collective reputation; Choice experiment; Economics, Agricultural (0503)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pozo, V. F. (2009). Consumer preferences for emerging trends in organics: product origin and scale of supply chain operations. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/2329

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pozo, Veronica F. “Consumer preferences for emerging trends in organics: product origin and scale of supply chain operations.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed September 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/2329.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pozo, Veronica F. “Consumer preferences for emerging trends in organics: product origin and scale of supply chain operations.” 2009. Web. 22 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Pozo VF. Consumer preferences for emerging trends in organics: product origin and scale of supply chain operations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/2329.

Council of Science Editors:

Pozo VF. Consumer preferences for emerging trends in organics: product origin and scale of supply chain operations. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/2329


Freie Universität Berlin

2. Marburger, Jutta. Occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the farm of origin.

Degree: 2007, Freie Universität Berlin

Six selected pig farms of a fattening association in Lower Saxony, Germany, were surveyed for Salmonella and Campylobacter. It was the aim of the study to find out possible relationships between positive results and predilection sites or farm management. The procedure: Samples were taken from the animal environment. Following the black and white separation scheme of the farms, samples were allocated to the interior (faeces, slatted floors, feeding and drinking troughs, flies, boots), to the exterior (water from the site, soil, bird faeces, rectal swabs from dogs or cats) and from the supply and disposing area (feed silos, municipal or fountain water, compost). In addition, farm internal management factors were taken as well as a ground view of the aerea was set up. All farms were visited twice during the year 2003 (between January and June and between September and November). In total, 657 samples were tested for Salmonella (following DIN ISO 6579) and Campylobacter (following ISO DIS 10272). The obtained Salmonella strains were serotyped at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, the species differentiation of the Campylobacter isolates was performed via biochemical reactions in the laboratory of the institute. Results: Isolates: Results reflect a different burden and distribution of the zoonotic agents in the environment. Salmonella was detected in 5,9 % of all samples. Three of six farms were positive, the percentage ranged from 0,0 % to 28,1 %. Based on all results, isolates were obtained from 6 % of samples from the interior, from 7,8 % of samples from the exterior and in 2,7 % of cases from the supply and disposal area. Predominantly identified were Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Derby. Campylobacter was obtained from 27,4 % of all samples, with a detection rate between 12,5 % and 41,2 %. Campylobacter isolates were only found in the interior (35,0 %) and in the exterior (11,6 %). Predominantly identified species were Campylobacter lari and Campylobacter coli. Management: Circumstances which might promote the occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter were identified. Salmonella positive were the animal environments in farms with more than 12 animals per pen (farm D and F) as well as farms with a stocking number of more than 1000 and more animals (farm C and D). However, the effect of stocking number was not always the case: (farm E and F). It was concluded that the presence of more than one species present on the site (farm C) or not appropriate hygiene and farm management (defect drinking trough facilities, spilling liquid manure [farm D]) might further promote the occurrence of Salmonella in the animal environment. A higher burden of Campylobacter was obtained in the environment of farms without disinfection in contrast to farms performing disinfection (farm A and C), with the exemption of farm F (no disinfection), showing the second lowest Campylobacter detection rate. A massive burden of flies (farm E) went along with a high Campylobacter prevalence in the animal environment. Advisors/Committee Members: n (gender), Univ.-Prof. Dr. R. Fries (firstReferee), Univ.-Prof. Dr. L.H. Wieler (furtherReferee), Univ.-Prof. Dr. K.-H. Zessin (furtherReferee).

Subjects/Keywords: Farm of origin; pork chain; environment; Salmonella; Campylobacter; 600 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften::630 Landwirtschaft::630 Landwirtschaft und verwandte Bereiche

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marburger, J. (2007). Occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the farm of origin. (Thesis). Freie Universität Berlin. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.17169/refubium-11615

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marburger, Jutta. “Occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the farm of origin.” 2007. Thesis, Freie Universität Berlin. Accessed September 22, 2020. http://dx.doi.org/10.17169/refubium-11615.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marburger, Jutta. “Occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the farm of origin.” 2007. Web. 22 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Marburger J. Occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the farm of origin. [Internet] [Thesis]. Freie Universität Berlin; 2007. [cited 2020 Sep 22]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.17169/refubium-11615.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Marburger J. Occurrence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the farm of origin. [Thesis]. Freie Universität Berlin; 2007. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.17169/refubium-11615

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.