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You searched for subject:(Facework Strategies). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Montana Tech

1. Cho, Min Kyong. Collective Privacy Boundary Turbulence and Facework Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of South Korea and the United States.

Degree: MA, 2012, Montana Tech

This study examined individuals’ perceived face threat and appropriateness of facework strategies when people witness one of their family members discloses family secrets to others. The disclosure of family secrets was framed as a face threatening situation where family’s collective privacy rules were violated (i.e., collective privacy boundary turbulence). Korean college students (N = 435) and U.S. college students (N = 343) completed the surveys. Participants were randomly assigned to evaluate one of eight hypothetical scenarios associated with the disclosure of family secretes. The scenarios reflected two cultural-level variables: an in-group and an out-group distinction and hierarchical relationships. The results showed that both Korean and U.S. participants perceived greater face threat when family secrets were disclosed to an out-group member than an in-group member. Korean participants perceived greater face threat than U.S. participants, regardless of the target of disclosure. Both Korean and U.S. participants perceived integrating facework as the most appropriate and dominating facework as the least appropriate facework strategies. Korean participants perceived dominating facework strategies as more appropriate than U.S. participants. Other findings showed self-construal that is culturally salient (Korean’s interdependent and U.S. American’s independent) was a predictor of facework strategies. Individual-level power distance better predicted Korean participants’ facework strategies than those of U.S. participants. This study revealed more cultural similarities than cultural differences in perceived face threat and facework strategies between Korean and U.S. cultures. This study also provided insight on critical methodological issue (cultural correction of mean scores) in cross-cultural research in communication.

Subjects/Keywords: Collective Privacy Boundary Turbulence; Face Threat; Facework Strategies; Korean Confucianism; Privacy Rules

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cho, M. K. (2012). Collective Privacy Boundary Turbulence and Facework Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of South Korea and the United States. (Masters Thesis). Montana Tech. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/206

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cho, Min Kyong. “Collective Privacy Boundary Turbulence and Facework Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of South Korea and the United States.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Montana Tech. Accessed June 23, 2018. http://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/206.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cho, Min Kyong. “Collective Privacy Boundary Turbulence and Facework Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of South Korea and the United States.” 2012. Web. 23 Jun 2018.

Vancouver:

Cho MK. Collective Privacy Boundary Turbulence and Facework Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of South Korea and the United States. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Montana Tech; 2012. [cited 2018 Jun 23]. Available from: http://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/206.

Council of Science Editors:

Cho MK. Collective Privacy Boundary Turbulence and Facework Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of South Korea and the United States. [Masters Thesis]. Montana Tech; 2012. Available from: http://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/206

2. CHUANG, HSUN-YU. IDENTITY MANAGEMENT POLITICS IN GLOCALIZED ENGLISH HEGEMONY: CULTURAL STRUGGLES, FACEWORK STRATEGIES, AND INTERCULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS IN TAIWANESE ENGLISH EDUCATION.

Degree: PhD, Communication Studies, 2017, Southern Illinois University

The globalization of the English language has rendered both positive and negative impacts to countries around the world. With the ever-increasing pervasiveness of the English language, many non-native-English-speaking (NNES hereafter) people and countries have shown growing interests in teaching and learning English. Some governments of these NNES countries have decided to implement “English” as a mandatory school subject into their compulsory curriculum in order to “connect with the world” and/or to increase their nation’s international image. However, in these NNES countries, English often does not hold official capacity and is taught as a foreign language (EFL). Although English (language) education can bring positive changes to a nation, it is not free of problems. Essentially, English education influences many NNES countries and their citizens in sociocultural, economic, and educational arenas. Some scholars, such as Tsuda (2008), assert that the “problems” and impacts are inseparable from “English language hegemony.” My country of origin, Taiwan, is one of the EFL and NNES countries that implements English education in our nation’s compulsory education. In recent decades, communicative-based English educational approaches have received great support from the Taiwanese Ministry of Education. In an EFL setting, such as that in Taiwan, the said educational approaches have complicated English education even further. In particular, the communicative-based approaches focus on teaching and practicing English oral proficiency, which average Taiwanese citizens do not need in their daily lives. Many Taiwanese people experience identity struggles and self-esteem issues because of their less-than-desirable English oral proficiency. In addition to Taiwanese, native-English-speaking (NES) teachers who are recruited to teach English in Taiwan are an integral part of the Taiwanese English education. As a Taiwanese citizen and an intercultural communication scholar, I recognize the intricate complexity of Taiwanese English education and am compelled to examine it in this dissertation as it has not received much attention in the discipline of Communication Studies. In this dissertation, I employ Identity Management Theory (IMT) (Cupach & Imahori, 1993; Imahori & Cupach, 2005) as the primary theoretical framework to examine Taiwanese English education. Particularly, I utilize IMT to study the identity construction and management (such as identity freezing), facework strategies, and intercultural relationship development among NES teachers, Taiwanese English teachers, and Taiwanese students. To carry out this research, I employ critical complete-member ethnography (CCME) (Toyosaki, 2011) as the central research methodology, because I see myself as a complete-member researcher with my research participants. I share complete-memberships with them in nuanced, complex, and contextual manners. Methodologically, CCME entails ethnography of communication, autoethnography, and critical ethnography; all are informative of my data… Advisors/Committee Members: Toyosaki, Satoshi.

Subjects/Keywords: English as a foreign language; English hegemony; Facework strategies; Identity management politics; Intercultural relationships; Taiwanese English education

…76 CHAPTER FIVE – Identity Freezing, Facework Strategies, and Transitions of Relational… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

CHUANG, H. (2017). IDENTITY MANAGEMENT POLITICS IN GLOCALIZED ENGLISH HEGEMONY: CULTURAL STRUGGLES, FACEWORK STRATEGIES, AND INTERCULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS IN TAIWANESE ENGLISH EDUCATION. (Doctoral Dissertation). Southern Illinois University. Retrieved from http://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/dissertations/1345

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

CHUANG, HSUN-YU. “IDENTITY MANAGEMENT POLITICS IN GLOCALIZED ENGLISH HEGEMONY: CULTURAL STRUGGLES, FACEWORK STRATEGIES, AND INTERCULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS IN TAIWANESE ENGLISH EDUCATION.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Southern Illinois University. Accessed June 23, 2018. http://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/dissertations/1345.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

CHUANG, HSUN-YU. “IDENTITY MANAGEMENT POLITICS IN GLOCALIZED ENGLISH HEGEMONY: CULTURAL STRUGGLES, FACEWORK STRATEGIES, AND INTERCULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS IN TAIWANESE ENGLISH EDUCATION.” 2017. Web. 23 Jun 2018.

Vancouver:

CHUANG H. IDENTITY MANAGEMENT POLITICS IN GLOCALIZED ENGLISH HEGEMONY: CULTURAL STRUGGLES, FACEWORK STRATEGIES, AND INTERCULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS IN TAIWANESE ENGLISH EDUCATION. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Southern Illinois University; 2017. [cited 2018 Jun 23]. Available from: http://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/dissertations/1345.

Council of Science Editors:

CHUANG H. IDENTITY MANAGEMENT POLITICS IN GLOCALIZED ENGLISH HEGEMONY: CULTURAL STRUGGLES, FACEWORK STRATEGIES, AND INTERCULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS IN TAIWANESE ENGLISH EDUCATION. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Southern Illinois University; 2017. Available from: http://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/dissertations/1345

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