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You searched for subject:(Exorcists). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Princeton University

1. Henry, Jonathan Klein. EXORCISTS: THE ORIGINS, ROLES, AND LIVES OF LATE ANTIQUE EXORCISM SPECIALISTS .

Degree: PhD, 2020, Princeton University

This dissertation offers a detailed account of the historical origins, professional roles, and personal lives of Jews and Christians who practiced exorcism, especially highlighting their contributions to emerging social institutions and cultural identities in Late Antiquity. Beginning in Judaea in the Second Temple era, I show that Jesus and his early followers utilized exorcism as an unconventional means for appropriating special authority typically assigned to scribes, priests, and other Judaean ritual experts. I argue that the practice of exorcism became prevalent among Gentile Christian congregations when Christian leaders encountered diasporic Judaean ritual practitioners, who were sometimes called “exorcists” by authors who wrote in Greek. Inspired in part by traditions about Jesus, Gentile Christian leaders fostered populist, non-literate approaches to exorcism, and branded traditional Jewish ritual experts as illegitimate, ineffective, and illicit (thus contributing to the concept of “Jewish magic”). Throughout the second and third centuries, Christian leaders curated the socio-political capabilities of exorcism, which led to the creation of an order of Christian exorcists in the early episcopal hierarchy. The order of exorcists became obsolete around the beginning of the fifth century, but not before Christian leaders had sufficiently established rhetoric to malign Jewish practitioners of exorcism as magicians; meanwhile, educated Christians increasingly produced “magical” exorcism texts and objects without apparent jeopardy to a stable sense of Christian identity. To support these arguments, the dissertation draws upon an original database of evidence I have collected for more than fifty individual exorcists, including a comprehensive collection of epigraphical sources for approximately thirty Late Antique exorcists. Besides contributing to social history and the epigraphical study of Late Antique religious functionaries, the dissertation also proposes fresh interpretations for sources in the Dead Sea Scrolls, Hellenistic Jewish literature, the New Testament, the writings of early Christian apologists and ecclesiastical leaders, rabbinic texts, and Greek and Roman authors from Late Antiquity. Ultimately, this study exhibits the substantial impact of exorcists and exorcism on the history of Jews, Christians, and others in Late Antiquity. Advisors/Committee Members: Luijendijk, AnneMarie (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Early Christianity; Exorcism; Exorcists; Magic; Rabbinic Judaism; Second Temple Judaism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Henry, J. K. (2020). EXORCISTS: THE ORIGINS, ROLES, AND LIVES OF LATE ANTIQUE EXORCISM SPECIALISTS . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp015x21tj38q

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Henry, Jonathan Klein. “EXORCISTS: THE ORIGINS, ROLES, AND LIVES OF LATE ANTIQUE EXORCISM SPECIALISTS .” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed October 21, 2020. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp015x21tj38q.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Henry, Jonathan Klein. “EXORCISTS: THE ORIGINS, ROLES, AND LIVES OF LATE ANTIQUE EXORCISM SPECIALISTS .” 2020. Web. 21 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Henry JK. EXORCISTS: THE ORIGINS, ROLES, AND LIVES OF LATE ANTIQUE EXORCISM SPECIALISTS . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2020. [cited 2020 Oct 21]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp015x21tj38q.

Council of Science Editors:

Henry JK. EXORCISTS: THE ORIGINS, ROLES, AND LIVES OF LATE ANTIQUE EXORCISM SPECIALISTS . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2020. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp015x21tj38q


University of Helsinki

2. Pöysälä, Tuomas. From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700.

Degree: Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies; Helsingfors universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för filosofi, historia, kultur- och konstforskning, 2017, University of Helsinki

The purpose of this study is to create a comprehensive picture of exorcisms performed on the British Isles between 1550 – 1700. By reading all of the pamphlets from England, Scotland and Ireland that include exorcism narratives, a much more varied picture is formed when compared to older studies. The end of the 16th century saw a growing conflict between the Calvin-leaning Church of England, Luther-leaning Puritans and the Roman Catholics regarding the performance of exorcisms. The Church of England saw exorcisms as an example of 'popish' superstition and denied the possibility of successful exorcisms. The dissenting sect of Puritans wanted to modernize the rite from superstitious influences and the Catholics saw the performance of exorcisms as a way to convert the laity back to the Catholic faith. The pamphlets published during the late 16th century are mostly polemic and contain extensive prefaces detailing the author's stance regarding exorcism. The Church of England was able to solidify its power and effectively disallow the clergy from performing exorcisms and drive out the Catholics at the start of the 17th century and effectively stopped the publication of both witchcraft and exorcism pamphlets as a result. However, the creation of a Protestant unity had not been succesful. The Catholic connections of King Charles I, the following civil war and interregnum around the middle point of the 17th century caused a fragmentation of religious unity and made witchcraft fears increase once again. Witchcraft pamphlet publishing saw a revival first, followed a decade later by new exorcism pamphlets. As the clerical exorcisms were still seen as 'popish' superstition, the exorcists of these new pamphlets came from the laity and medical professions. Superstitious 'white magic' cures performed by the laity, cunning-folk as they were known, made up a large portion of healing during the early modern era, so they also had to deal with demonic possession and witchcraft quite often. The witchcraft trials of England and Scotland were secular affairs due to legislation, and usually involved medical professionals in order to distinguish between natural and supernatural symptoms. Thus medical professionals had a working understanding of possession and made up the majority of the late 17th century exorcists. The fragmentation of the authority on exorcism methods in England, as opposed to the Catholic continent, meant that both the performers and the methodology became mixed; elements of old conjuration magic, superstitious spells and medicine were used side by side. The later pamphlets either told of miraculous events and cures or advertised the accomplishments of various physicians. The very end of the 17th century saw the release of heavily sceptical pamphlets, as the scepticism towards the supernatural in English society was at its highest. The most revealing were the mentions of unsuccessful exorcism attempts that usually preceded the main exorcist’s successful attempt. The pamphlets, whether they told of actual events or were…

Subjects/Keywords: Demons; Devil; Early Modern Era; Exorcism; Exorcists; Illness; Medicine; Pamphlets; Polemics; Possession; Reformation; Roman Catholicism; Superstitions; General History; Yleinen historia; Allmän historia; Demons; Devil; Early Modern Era; Exorcism; Exorcists; Illness; Medicine; Pamphlets; Polemics; Possession; Reformation; Roman Catholicism; Superstitions

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pöysälä, T. (2017). From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700. (Masters Thesis). University of Helsinki. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pöysälä, Tuomas. “From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Helsinki. Accessed October 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pöysälä, Tuomas. “From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Pöysälä T. From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Helsinki; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254.

Council of Science Editors:

Pöysälä T. From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700. [Masters Thesis]. University of Helsinki; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254

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