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You searched for subject:(Equine ophthalmology). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Oregon State University

1. Gordon, Emma. Evaluation of Topical Application of 1% Morphine Sulfate Solution as an Analgesic on the Healthy Equine Eye.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Science, 2016, Oregon State University

Corneal ulcers are one of the most common eye conditions of the horse, with potentially serious complications such as loss of vision or the eye itself. They are extremely painful due to the large number of sensory nerve endings found in the cornea. Horses frequently show signs of ophthalmic pain despite systemic analgesics, which have side effects including renal and gastrointestinal toxicity, and CNS excitement. Morphine applied topically to the eye has been shown to have a rapid onset of action in rabbits, dogs and humans and provides effective analgesia without deleterious side effects on corneal healing. Despite investigation of topical ophthalmic morphine in other species, there are no published reports for its use in horses. In the first study detailed here, we evaluated whether or not short term administration of 1% morphine sulfate was safe to use on the equine cornea and whether this morphine would be absorbed into the serum, aqueous, or vitreous. Morphine was applied topically to one eye of six horses every four hours for 72 hours before euthanasia. Serum samples were collected at varying time points during the study and ocular fluid collected immediately after euthanasia. Treated and control corneas were sent for histopathology. Horses showed no systemic or ocular adverse effects. Corneal histopathology confirmed there was no difference in microscopic appearance between morphine treated and control corneas. Morphine was detected by ELISA in aqueous humor of the treated eye for all 6 horses with a mean ± standard deviation of 165.18 ng/ml ± 87.69 ng/ml. Morphine was also detected in vitreous humor of the treated eye of 5/6 horse with a mean ± standard deviation of 4.87 ± 4.46 ng/ml. Morphine was detected in the serum of 5/6 horses at varying time points. There was significant variability in serum morphine concentrations between horses. In general, topical morphine sulfate applied to the eye every four hours can be expected to result in systemic absorption, with peak systemic concentrations occurring approximately 5-10 minutes after administration. In addition, morphine concentrations were more consistently detected on day two and three, than day one of administration. Maximum systemic concentration reached in a single horse was 6.98 ng/ml. The objective of the second study was to test the hypothesis that topical 1% morphine sulfate applied to the equine cornea will result in decreased corneal sensitivity compared to a control eye as measured by corneal aesthesiometer. Mean baseline corneal touch threshold of both control eye and treated eye was 21.8mm. Corneal touch threshold was not significantly different between morphine treated and control eyes at any time point. In conclusion, these studies determined 1% morphine to be safe for short term use on the equine eye and showed that 1% morphine does not provide an anesthetic effect on the intact cornea. Further studies to evaluate a possible analgesic effect are warranted. Advisors/Committee Members: Schlipf, John. W. Jr (advisor), Heidel, Jerry (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Eye; Equine ophthalmology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gordon, E. (2016). Evaluation of Topical Application of 1% Morphine Sulfate Solution as an Analgesic on the Healthy Equine Eye. (Masters Thesis). Oregon State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1957/59771

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gordon, Emma. “Evaluation of Topical Application of 1% Morphine Sulfate Solution as an Analgesic on the Healthy Equine Eye.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Oregon State University. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/59771.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gordon, Emma. “Evaluation of Topical Application of 1% Morphine Sulfate Solution as an Analgesic on the Healthy Equine Eye.” 2016. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Gordon E. Evaluation of Topical Application of 1% Morphine Sulfate Solution as an Analgesic on the Healthy Equine Eye. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Oregon State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/59771.

Council of Science Editors:

Gordon E. Evaluation of Topical Application of 1% Morphine Sulfate Solution as an Analgesic on the Healthy Equine Eye. [Masters Thesis]. Oregon State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/59771


University of Florida

2. Herrmann, James William. Delivery of the Antifungal Agents Nystatin and Voriconazole by Iontophoresis in an Ex Vivo Rabbit Cornea Model.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Medical Sciences - Veterinary Medicine, 2019, University of Florida

The objective of this research was to determine the potential for electromigration of anti-fungal chemotherapeutic agents and evaluate iontophoretic delivery of nystatin and voriconazole to cornea. Advisors/Committee Members: Plummer,Caryn E (committee chair), Hamor,Ralph Edward (committee member), Gibson,Daniel J (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: equine  – iontophoresis  – keratomycosis  – nystatin  – ophthalmology  – veterinary  – voriconazole

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Herrmann, J. W. (2019). Delivery of the Antifungal Agents Nystatin and Voriconazole by Iontophoresis in an Ex Vivo Rabbit Cornea Model. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0054475

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Herrmann, James William. “Delivery of the Antifungal Agents Nystatin and Voriconazole by Iontophoresis in an Ex Vivo Rabbit Cornea Model.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed July 10, 2020. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0054475.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Herrmann, James William. “Delivery of the Antifungal Agents Nystatin and Voriconazole by Iontophoresis in an Ex Vivo Rabbit Cornea Model.” 2019. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Herrmann JW. Delivery of the Antifungal Agents Nystatin and Voriconazole by Iontophoresis in an Ex Vivo Rabbit Cornea Model. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0054475.

Council of Science Editors:

Herrmann JW. Delivery of the Antifungal Agents Nystatin and Voriconazole by Iontophoresis in an Ex Vivo Rabbit Cornea Model. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2019. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0054475

3. Wehrman, Rita Fay. A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing.

Degree: 2017, Iowa State University

Corneal disease is a significant cause of decreased vision or blindness in the horse worldwide. Numerous topical and systemic drugs over a prolonged period of time may be used to treat an equine corneal ulcer. Despite the high prevalence of corneal disease and ulceration in the horse, and the complexity of corneal wound healing, research is limited and more heavily devoted to in vivo studies whose limitations include small sample sizes and ethical considerations. Bench top laboratory in vitro studies are limited in number and overlook the complexity of corneal wound healing by assessing each corneal layer separately from its neighbor. The objective of this study was to develop a novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing that maintained structural integrity, and is physiologically relevant, mimicking in vivo events. In this randomized and controlled study, fourteen equine corneas were harvested within two hours of humane euthanasia for reasons unrelated to this study. All donors were screened and corneas were included if they were free of ocular and systemic disease. Corneas were immediately processed and corneoscleral rims excised 2 mm posterior to the limbus. Corneas were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: wounded (n=8) or unwounded (n=6) controls. Each pair of eyes was divided such that corneas from the same horse were assigned to a different group. In the event that only one of the two eyes was included, the eye was assigned to the wounded group. In the ‘wounded’ group, the axial cornea was wounded for 60 seconds with a 6 mm disk of filter paper soaked in 1N sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Epithelial ulceration was confirmed employing fluorescein stain. Subsequently, all corneas were cultured using an air-liquid interface model in complete media. The corneal cups were placed on a rocker set at a 6 degree incline and incubated at 37 °C with 5% CO2 humidity. The media bathed the cornea 8 times per minute to simulate normal horse blinking. Evaluation of corneal healing was performed daily and included fluorescein staining and fluorescein retention (i.e. ulcer measurements). Corneas from both groups were randomly assigned to undergo further processing via histopathology at designated time points of 24 hours (T24; n=5), T48 (n=5), and T72 (n=4) post wounding, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Structural integrity and pathologic changes to the corneal epithelium, stroma, Descemet’s membrane and endothelium were assessed. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression was then evaluated by means of RNAscope in situ hybridization. All wounded corneas healed within 72 hours. Histologically, normal corneal architecture was observed including intact epithelium, minimal stromal edema, and presence of endothelium. Increased IL-6 expression was noted in wounded corneas compared to unwounded controls and was predominantly in the metabolically active basal epithelial cell layer. As the corneal wound healing progressed, IL-6 expression decreased. The equine air-liquid interface, ex vivo, corneal wound healing model…

Subjects/Keywords: Cornea; Equine; Ex vivo; Healing; Interleukin-6; Wound; Ophthalmology; Veterinary Medicine

…North Am Equine Pract 8:451-457, 1992 4. Gilger, BC. (2005) Equine Ophthalmology… …sclera. (2007) In: Equine Ophthalmology, 4th edn (ed. Gelatt KN) Blackwell… …2 References: 1. Gilger, BC. (2005) Equine Ophthalmology. 3rd ed. St. Louis… …GENERAL INTRODUCTION Structure of the Equine Cornea The cornea and sclera are part of the… …increase in equine disease processes such as dermatologic epidermal wound healing,68 pneumonia,69… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wehrman, R. F. (2017). A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15456

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wehrman, Rita Fay. “A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing.” 2017. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed July 10, 2020. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15456.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wehrman, Rita Fay. “A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing.” 2017. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Wehrman RF. A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15456.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wehrman RF. A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2017. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15456

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.