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1. Daley, Caitlin Michelle. Growth Management and Regional Government: How an Interpretive Approach Can Explain Politicians' Commitment to Smart Growth Policies in Waterloo Region, Ontario.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2018, York University

This dissertation is a case study that explains how the Waterloo areas regional government in Ontario, Canada, came to embrace smart growth policies, which aim to protect agricultural and environmentally sensitive areas from urban sprawl while creating more dense urban communities. It develops an interpretive approach based on Mark Bevir and Rod Rhodess work on situated agency to explain why the 2010 to 2014 Region of Waterloo council defended the Regions smart growth policies against two major challenges, choosing to build its intensification-focused light rail transit (LRT) project despite public controversy, and choosing to appeal an Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) ruling that threatened its most recent official plan. Based on interviews, archival research, and document review, the dissertation is written in three parts that tell three kinds of stories, using Bevir and Rhodess concepts of tradition, dilemma, and webs of beliefs. Part I uses a historical narrative to explain the tradition of growth management and regional government in the Waterloo area. It finds that regional government and growth management have conditioned each other over the course of the last half century. Part II explains the dilemmas that the 2010 to 2014 regional council faced as a group in deciding to defend its smart growth policies. It finds that dilemmas related to light rail transit were resolved, and that meaningful dilemmas did not form as a result of the OMB ruling. Part III uses a series of narrative vignettes to examine the beliefs and actions of each regional councillor as an individual in the context of their own web of beliefs. It finds that politicians supported smart growth in their own ways and for their own reasons. The dissertation concludes with an assessment of what the three stories taken together show with respect to both specific aspects of planning policy and our understanding of practices of municipal government in Waterloo Region. Finally, it suggests that an interpretive institutionalism in political science may be both possible and warranted, and that narrative approaches to the study of politics can produce accounts that are both academically rigorous and interesting to a broader audience. Advisors/Committee Members: Pilon, Dennis M. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Urban planning; Smart growth; Growth management; Urban sprawl; Urban planning; Planning policy; Regional planning; Environmentalism; Environmental protection; Farmland; Light rail transit; LRT; Higher order transit; Official plans; Ontario Municipal Board; OMB; Aging in place; Land budget methodology; Intensification; Density; Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe; Ontario Greenbelt; Province of Ontario; Waterloo Region; Region of Waterloo; City of Waterloo; City of Kitchener; City of Cambridge; Township of Wellesley; Township of Woolwich; Township of Wilmot; Township of North Dumfries; Regional Growth Management Strategy; Countryside Line; Protected Countryside; East Side Lands; Waterloo Moraine; Environmentally Sensitive Policy Areas; ESPAs; Environmentally Sensitive Landscapes; ESLs; Municipal restructuring; Local government reform; Waterloo Area Local Government Review; Municipalities; Ontario municipalities; Regional municipalities; Ontario planning; Politics of urban development; Urban development; Public policy; Case study; Interpretive political science; Interpretivism; New institutionalism; Interpretive institutionalism; Mark Bevir; R.A.W. Rhodes; Tradition; Dilemma; Beliefs; Web of beliefs; Procedural individualism; Situated agency; Narrative research methods; Vignettes; Storytelling; Politicians; Ken Seiling; Doug Craig; Jane Brewer; Claudette Millar; Carl Zehr; Brenda Halloran; Les Armstrong; Ross Kelterborn; Todd Cowan; Rob Deutschmann; Jane Mitchell; Tom Galloway; Sean Strickland; Jim Wideman; Jean Haalboom; Geoff Lorentz

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Daley, C. M. (2018). Growth Management and Regional Government: How an Interpretive Approach Can Explain Politicians' Commitment to Smart Growth Policies in Waterloo Region, Ontario. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34277

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Daley, Caitlin Michelle. “Growth Management and Regional Government: How an Interpretive Approach Can Explain Politicians' Commitment to Smart Growth Policies in Waterloo Region, Ontario.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed April 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34277.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Daley, Caitlin Michelle. “Growth Management and Regional Government: How an Interpretive Approach Can Explain Politicians' Commitment to Smart Growth Policies in Waterloo Region, Ontario.” 2018. Web. 06 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Daley CM. Growth Management and Regional Government: How an Interpretive Approach Can Explain Politicians' Commitment to Smart Growth Policies in Waterloo Region, Ontario. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2018. [cited 2020 Apr 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34277.

Council of Science Editors:

Daley CM. Growth Management and Regional Government: How an Interpretive Approach Can Explain Politicians' Commitment to Smart Growth Policies in Waterloo Region, Ontario. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34277

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