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You searched for subject:(EnergyStar). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Mississippi State University

1. Hueffed, Anna Kathrine. ANALYSIS AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHP, CCHP, CHP-ORC, AND CCHP-ORC SYSTEMS.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2010, Mississippi State University

Increased demand for energy, rising energy costs, and heightened environmental concerns are driving forces that continually press for the improvement and development of new technologies to promote energy savings and emissions reduction. Combined heating and power (CHP), combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP), and organic Rankine cycles (ORC) are a few of the technologies that promise to reduce primary energy consumption (PEC), cost, and emissions. CHP systems generate electricity at or near the place of consumption using a prime mover, e.g. a combustion engine or a turbine, and utilize the accompanying exhaust heat that would otherwise be wasted to satisfy the buildings thermal demand. In the case of CCHP systems, exhaust heat also goes to satisfy a cooling load. An organic Rankine cycle (ORC) combined with a CHP or CCHP system can generate electricity from any surplus low-grade heat, thereby reducing the total primary energy, cost, and emissions. This research first presents a review of the economical, energetic, and environmental benefits of CHP and CHP-ORC systems for a small office in various climates. Operating the systems 24 hours a day is compared to operating the system during typical office hours and benefits of the CHP system in terms of the EnergyStar and LEED programs are presented. Another objective of this dissertation is to study the critical role of the prime mover on the performance of CHP, CCHP, CHP-ORC, and CCHP-ORC systems under different pricing structures. Three different size natural gas engines are simulated for a small office under different operational strategies such as: follow the facility's electric demand, follow the facility's thermal demand, and follow a constant load. Simple optimizations were carried out to improve the system's performance. Using real prices for electricity and fuel to compute operational costs was compared to using the building's average prices without a CCHP system. Finally, a CCHP system using a load-share turbine for a large office building was examined while considering the source of carbon dioxide emissions, carbon offsetting through purchasing carbon credits, and available capital costs. Advisors/Committee Members: Pedro J. Mago (chair), Rogelio Luck (committee member), B. Keith Hodge (committee member), Kaylan K. Srinivasan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: CHP; primary energy; EnergyStar; carbon credits; LEED; operational strategies; carbon dioxide emissions; ORC; CCHP

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hueffed, A. K. (2010). ANALYSIS AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHP, CCHP, CHP-ORC, AND CCHP-ORC SYSTEMS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03312010-114717/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hueffed, Anna Kathrine. “ANALYSIS AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHP, CCHP, CHP-ORC, AND CCHP-ORC SYSTEMS.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03312010-114717/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hueffed, Anna Kathrine. “ANALYSIS AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHP, CCHP, CHP-ORC, AND CCHP-ORC SYSTEMS.” 2010. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hueffed AK. ANALYSIS AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHP, CCHP, CHP-ORC, AND CCHP-ORC SYSTEMS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03312010-114717/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Hueffed AK. ANALYSIS AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHP, CCHP, CHP-ORC, AND CCHP-ORC SYSTEMS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2010. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03312010-114717/ ;


University of Florida

2. Strauss, Kurt. Energy and Cost Implications of the Florida Energy Star Residential HVAC Rebate Program.

Degree: M.S.B.C., Building Construction, 2012, University of Florida

In July 2010, the Florida’s Governors Energy Office released the Florida ENERGY STAR Residential HVAC Rebate Program. The program was funded by a grant from the Federal Recovery and Reinvestment Act and allocated 15 Million (M) for the Florida ENERGY STAR Residential HVAC Rebate Program. The Program was designed to provide a 1,500 State Rebate for homeowners who purchase and install a new HVAC system. This amounts to 10,000rebates for Florida homeowners. The program started on August 1, 2010. On September 14, 2010 the program was put on hold by the Leaders of the Florida State Legislature. On November 16, 2010, the Florida State Legislature held special session and made a ruling, Rule 16B, on the Florida ENERGY STAR Residential HVAC Rebate Program. The final decision ruled that the rebates would only be paid out to homeowners who had their HVAC systems contracted to be replaced in a 2 week window, from August 31, 2010 – September14, 2010, and installed on or before November 30, 2010. The rest of allocated funds would be used to fund outstanding solar rebates unrelated to the HVAC and Appliance Rebate Program for the Florida Solar Energy System Incentives Program. In July 2011 a final report was released by the Florida Office of Energy on the Florida ENERGY STAR Residential HVAC Rebate Program. It showed a total of 4,286 rebates were approved and paid as a result of the Program. There was an additional 1,088 rebate applications that were rejected. In February 2012, the Florida Office of Energy released their 2011 annual report,which contained supplemental data pertaining to how the reallocated funds were spent on the Florida Solar Incentives Program’s outstanding rebates for solar photovoltaic systems and solar hot water systems. This study aims to determine the energy and cost implications of the Florida ENERGY STAR Residential HVAC Rebate Program by comparing the Program’s potential energy and cost implications to the Program’s outcome energy and cost implications. The findings of this study showed that the outcome energy and cost savings of the Florida ENERGY STAR Residential HVAC Rebate Program exceeded the potential energy and cost savings by approximately 50,000 megawatt hours (mWh) of energy, or approximately 5 M. The main driver of the outcome energy and cost savings was the low rebate amount for solar hot water systems which made up 25% of the outcome energy and cost savings, but only cost 4% in rebates paid. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Srinivasan, Ravi (committee chair), Smailes, Richard (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Buildings; Cost savings; Energy; Energy efficiency; Heating ventilation and cooling; Homes; Life span; Potential energy; Sales rebates; Water tables; energy  – energystar  – florida  – hvac  – rebate  – residential

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APA (6th Edition):

Strauss, K. (2012). Energy and Cost Implications of the Florida Energy Star Residential HVAC Rebate Program. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0044776

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Strauss, Kurt. “Energy and Cost Implications of the Florida Energy Star Residential HVAC Rebate Program.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0044776.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Strauss, Kurt. “Energy and Cost Implications of the Florida Energy Star Residential HVAC Rebate Program.” 2012. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Strauss K. Energy and Cost Implications of the Florida Energy Star Residential HVAC Rebate Program. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0044776.

Council of Science Editors:

Strauss K. Energy and Cost Implications of the Florida Energy Star Residential HVAC Rebate Program. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2012. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0044776


University of Florida

3. Fleming, Brokc. Feasibility Analysis for the Development of Affordable Net-Zero Energy Housing in Gainesville, Florida.

Degree: M.S.B.C., Building Construction, 2009, University of Florida

Creating affordable housing requires design professionals, contractors, developers, lenders, and homeowners to work together to create homes for the income categories that need them the most. The demand for affordable housing in Gainesville, Florida is extremely high with much of the existing stock in dire need of rehabilitation. (Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse 2007) The incorporation of energy efficient improvements into affordable housing is essential to lower the homeowner?s monthly utility costs. The challenge exists in implementing strategies that are cost-effective without drastically increasing initial costs. This thesis studied the feasibility of creating an affordable net-zero energy home (ZEH) in Gainesville, Florida. The Neighborhood Housing and Development Corporation, a non-profit organization in Gainesville, has recently begun building affordable ENERGY STAR Qualified homes. These homes are required to use 15% less energy than a standard home built to code and have a program outline for achieving this increase in energy efficiency. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy 2009) One of their recently finished ENERGY STAR Qualified homes was chosen to be our baseline model to be upgraded to a ZEH. An in depth analysis of a near zero energy home (NZEH) recently constructed in Gainesville was performed to help determine what strategies could be incorporated into upgrading the ENERGY STAR Qualified home to a ZEH. Energy consumption analyses were utilized to identify which strategies provided the most cost-effective improvements to energy efficiency. Government and local utility rebates, incentives, and feed-in tariff program were included in the analysis to help offset the increased initial investment necessary to promote energy efficiency. Once upgraded components were determined, a detailed life cycle cost analysis was performed using the energy savings as cash flows with the incremental costs of energy efficient upgrades as the investment. Energy, gas, and general inflation were incorporated into the analysis to provide an accurate forecast of savings. Savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) and payback periods were derived from the data to determine which upgrades demonstrated the greatest return on investment. Analyses of varying available financing tactics were performed to strengthen the goal of affordability. A final analysis of the ENERGY STAR Qualified home with all cost-effective upgrades was executed to determine the added first costs and long-term savings for achieving a ZEH. The results demonstrated that with only a 10% increase of initial costs (including rebates) a homebuyer could upgrade an ENERGY STAR Qualified home to a ZEH. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Kibert, Charles J. (committee chair), Stroh, Robert C. (committee member), Sullivan, James (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cost analysis; Cost efficiency; Cost savings; Electricity; Energy; Energy consumption; Energy efficiency; Life cycle costs; Mortgage loans; Sales rebates; affordable, efficient, energy, energystar, florida, gainesville, hers, housing, net, photovoltaic, solar, tariff, zero

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fleming, B. (2009). Feasibility Analysis for the Development of Affordable Net-Zero Energy Housing in Gainesville, Florida. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025167

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fleming, Brokc. “Feasibility Analysis for the Development of Affordable Net-Zero Energy Housing in Gainesville, Florida.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025167.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fleming, Brokc. “Feasibility Analysis for the Development of Affordable Net-Zero Energy Housing in Gainesville, Florida.” 2009. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Fleming B. Feasibility Analysis for the Development of Affordable Net-Zero Energy Housing in Gainesville, Florida. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025167.

Council of Science Editors:

Fleming B. Feasibility Analysis for the Development of Affordable Net-Zero Energy Housing in Gainesville, Florida. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2009. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025167

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