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You searched for subject:(Emptying frequency). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Alberta

1. MacPherson, Jayden A R. Effects of pre-weaning plane of milk replacer and feeding frequency on glucose metabolism in dairy calves.

Degree: MS, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science, 2016, University of Alberta

Feeding dairy calves large milk meal sizes at a low feeding frequency has been associated with reduced insulin sensitivity in previous literature. Therefore, the aim of this thesis was to investigate the influence of feeding an elevated plane of milk on glucose metabolism in calves pre- and post-weaning. To assess insulin sensitivity in calves in chapter 2 and 3, postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations (pre-weaning), as well as insulin response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT; pre and post-weaning) were evaluated. In addition, in chapter 2 the rate of abomasal emptying was characterized pre-weaning to determine the extent of its control over glucose appearance in the blood. Results from chapter 2 where calves were fed a low (4 L/day) or a high (8 L/day) plane of milk twice daily indicated that calves fed either treatment did not experience hyperglycemia or hyperinsulinemia. Additionally, responses to a GTT were similar pre- or post-weaning suggesting both treatments had similar glucose tolerance at all ages. Abomasal emptying was reduced in calves fed a larger meal size (4 L) which indicates it can be used to modulate the appearance of glucose in the blood to prevent hyperglycemia. In chapter 3, feeding an elevated plane of milk (8 L/day) fed over four (4x; meal size 2 L) or two meals per day (2x; meal size 4 L) was compared. Neither treatment resulted in a state of hyperglycemia or hyperinsulinemia, and responses to the GTT were similar indicating similar glucose tolerance. Overall findings from this thesis suggest that calves fed an elevated plane of milk do not experience reduced insulin sensitivity when fed at differing frequencies of 2 or 4 times a day or when compared to calves fed a low plane of milk (4 L/day). These results have significant implications for the dairy industry as this means dairy operations can feed calves more milk, up to 8 L fed over two meals a day, allowing for greater pre-weaning growth without compromising glucose metabolism pre- or post-weaning.

Subjects/Keywords: calf nutrition; glucose and insulin; abomasal emptying; plane of nutriton; feeding frequency

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

MacPherson, J. A. R. (2016). Effects of pre-weaning plane of milk replacer and feeding frequency on glucose metabolism in dairy calves. (Masters Thesis). University of Alberta. Retrieved from https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c3b5918773

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

MacPherson, Jayden A R. “Effects of pre-weaning plane of milk replacer and feeding frequency on glucose metabolism in dairy calves.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Alberta. Accessed October 20, 2020. https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c3b5918773.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

MacPherson, Jayden A R. “Effects of pre-weaning plane of milk replacer and feeding frequency on glucose metabolism in dairy calves.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

MacPherson JAR. Effects of pre-weaning plane of milk replacer and feeding frequency on glucose metabolism in dairy calves. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alberta; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c3b5918773.

Council of Science Editors:

MacPherson JAR. Effects of pre-weaning plane of milk replacer and feeding frequency on glucose metabolism in dairy calves. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alberta; 2016. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c3b5918773


Delft University of Technology

2. Wesseling, Emilie (author). Getting a better grip on sanitation systems: Introducing a numerical model to identify, predict and mitigate hazardous events and measure the safety of on-site sanitation systems.

Degree: 2020, Delft University of Technology

Of the world's population, 59% of the people are not connected to a sewer system and use on-site sanitation (OSS) systems. A large amount of these systems is unsafe. The ultimate goal of this research is to gain knowledge on manners to improve and monitor the safety of on-site sanitation (OSS) systems. The performance and safety of OSS systems are highly dependent on the level of faecal sludge in OSS system which is largely dependent on the accumulation rate of the sludge. However, scientists have not found a simple method to assess the accumulation rate of sludge. Knowing the sludge accumulation rate and therefore, knowing how quickly a tank fills, makes it possible to the necessary time between two emptying events or, with other words, the required emptying frequency. With the research presented in this thesis, a dynamical approach to viewing and assessing the status of OSS systems is developed in the form of a model by combining sludge accumulation theory and only a small number of in-field measurements. The modelled simulation of sludge accumulation shows highly similar results to empirical sludge accumulation studies. On the basis of the model, also a user-friendly tool has been developed that allows tank owners, policymakers or regulators to get personal recommendations regarding the emptying frequency of their OSS systems. This offers a new approach and with that an improvement of the way OSS system can be safely managed and monitored. This thesis provides evidence for the feasibility of constructing a numerical model as a measure to simulate sludge accumulation in OSS systems that can lead to emptying frequency recommendations. The results of this thesis can help in obtaining safe sanitation throughout the world and is aimed to contribute to achieving the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 6.2. Advisors/Committee Members: Medema, G.J. (mentor), Johnston, Richard (mentor), Scholten, L. (graduation committee), Mostert, E. (graduation committee), Delft University of Technology (degree granting institution).

Subjects/Keywords: Septic tanks; Emptying frequency; Sludge accumulation rate; On-site sanitation systems; SDG6.2; Sanitation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wesseling, E. (. (2020). Getting a better grip on sanitation systems: Introducing a numerical model to identify, predict and mitigate hazardous events and measure the safety of on-site sanitation systems. (Masters Thesis). Delft University of Technology. Retrieved from http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:117f67df-2575-41cd-91c0-b42de38dbabc

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wesseling, Emilie (author). “Getting a better grip on sanitation systems: Introducing a numerical model to identify, predict and mitigate hazardous events and measure the safety of on-site sanitation systems.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Delft University of Technology. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:117f67df-2575-41cd-91c0-b42de38dbabc.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wesseling, Emilie (author). “Getting a better grip on sanitation systems: Introducing a numerical model to identify, predict and mitigate hazardous events and measure the safety of on-site sanitation systems.” 2020. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Wesseling E(. Getting a better grip on sanitation systems: Introducing a numerical model to identify, predict and mitigate hazardous events and measure the safety of on-site sanitation systems. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2020. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:117f67df-2575-41cd-91c0-b42de38dbabc.

Council of Science Editors:

Wesseling E(. Getting a better grip on sanitation systems: Introducing a numerical model to identify, predict and mitigate hazardous events and measure the safety of on-site sanitation systems. [Masters Thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2020. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:117f67df-2575-41cd-91c0-b42de38dbabc


Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

3. Ferneborg, Sabine. Milk removal.

Degree: 2016, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Milk from dairy cows is a staple dietary component for humans all over the world. Regardless of whether milk is consumed in its purest, unaltered form or as high-end products such as fine cheese or ice cream, it needs to be of high quality when taken from the cow, produced at a low price and produced in a system that consider aspects such as animal health, animal welfare and sustainability. This thesis investigated the role of milk removal and the importance of residual milk on milk yield, milk composition and milking efficiency in dairy cows. The specific aspects examined were whether residual milk retained in the udder, specifically its fat component, is involved in regulation of milk synthesis and secretion and whether removal of this residual milk influences milk yield, composition and quality, measured as milk fatty acid composition and free fatty acid content. The results showed that milking efficiency could be increased by increasing the pulsation ratio or using a higher cluster or teat cup take-off threshold, without negative effects on milk yield or milk composition. Milking time in automatic milking systems could thereby be decreased by one minute per cow and milking or more. Milk fatty acid composition was affected by several treatments tested, but the content of free fatty acids and the size distribution of milk fat globules were unaffected. Residual milk yield increased both due to repeated residual milk removal and to use of a higher cluster take-off level. Residual milk removal also increased the relative proportion of short-chain fatty acids in milk. The overall conclusion of this thesis is that residual milk removal in mid-lactation dairy cows does not affect milk yield and that milking efficiency in an automatic milking system can be increased with higher takeoff levels without affecting milk yield or composition. No evidence of a regulatory mechanism in residual milk was found, but residual milk removal increased milk fat synthesis.

Subjects/Keywords: dairy cows; milking; efficiency; milk composition; milk fat; free fatty acids; milk yield; milking equipment; udders; teat cups; Milk removal; Milk yield; Milk composition; Milk fat; Free fatty acids; Dairy cow; Automatic milking; Milking management; Udder emptying; Milking frequency

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ferneborg, S. (2016). Milk removal. (Doctoral Dissertation). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Retrieved from https://pub.epsilon.slu.se/13649/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ferneborg, Sabine. “Milk removal.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Accessed October 20, 2020. https://pub.epsilon.slu.se/13649/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ferneborg, Sabine. “Milk removal.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Ferneborg S. Milk removal. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: https://pub.epsilon.slu.se/13649/.

Council of Science Editors:

Ferneborg S. Milk removal. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2016. Available from: https://pub.epsilon.slu.se/13649/

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