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You searched for subject:(Emotional containment). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Pretoria

1. Meese, Debra Gail. Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training.

Degree: Psychology, 2007, University of Pretoria

This study seeks to explore students’ subjective and collective experience of an experiential family therapy module within the Clinical Psychology Masters training programme. It looks at the perceptions of nine trainee therapists who used genograms and family sculpting to present their family of origin. The study takes place after the completion of the practical internship year with the purpose of exploring relevant emotional, cognitive, social and therapeutic effects of this module. A literature survey reveals that the use of genograms and family sculpting during training has received little research interest as most studies have primarily focused on their use during therapy with clients and in supervision. There is a scarcity of literature available that pertains directly to psychologists themselves and their wider social context. An exploratory review has been made to supplement the literature and pertains to experiential programmes in training in general and the psychologist’s self in training. The epistemology that directs this research falls within a postmodern frame. The experience is viewed from within the broad systems perspective. This approach acknowledges the dynamic and recursive interactions which occur between and within systems, and permits a broad perspective to be taken that is inclusive rather than exclusive. A qualitative research design was selected as it lends itself particularly well to the study of the ‘lived realities’ of people within their context and allows the information gained from the study to guide the research process. Semi-structured open-ended in-depth interviews were used as they allow for greater freedom and fewer restrictions regarding direction for the participant. A thematic analysis was carried out in order for the central themes of the experience to emerge. These themes were discussed extensively and integrated with the literature available. The multigenerational family presentation seems to create greater awareness of patterns and roles and these insights have a pervasive impact in many contexts. Understandably, the trainees feel emotionally overwhelmed as they become both observer and observed, viewing their interaction from a third-person perspective. This awareness of process results in a loss of spontaneous response and initial debilitation which is associated with feelings of loss and isolation. The self-exploratory behaviour gives rise to a reflexive reconstruction of self as a result of the access to new meanings regarding the dynamics and relationships within the family system, which enhances understanding of the complex interplay of systems, and ultimately facilitates the processes of integration, repair and resolution. Advisors/Committee Members: Ms A Cramer (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Feedback; Containment; Vicarious learning; Insight; Isolation; Individuation/differentiation of self; Self-direction; Systems theory; Emotional autonomy; Cybernetics.; Experiential training; Family of origin; Family sculpting; Genogram; UCTD

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Meese, D. G. (2007). Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training. (Masters Thesis). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2263/28397

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meese, Debra Gail. “Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training.” 2007. Masters Thesis, University of Pretoria. Accessed November 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2263/28397.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meese, Debra Gail. “Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training.” 2007. Web. 24 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Meese DG. Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2007. [cited 2020 Nov 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/28397.

Council of Science Editors:

Meese DG. Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training. [Masters Thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/28397


University of Bath

2. Melaugh, Brian Thomas. Managing austerity : emotional containment in a residential children's home under threat.

Degree: Thesis (D.Health), 2016, University of Bath

The aim of the study was to explore the process and practice of leading change in residential child care and assess the efficacy of ‘emotional containment’ in this context. Residential child care in Ireland is experiencing significant change. Change is an emotional experience for staff and leadership is named as pivotal in organisational change. However, there is gap in the literature because leadership and organisational change theory does not fully fit with the relational nature of residential child care. The study is responding to this gap in literature and employs a qualitative case study to explore the impact of organisational change on residential child care, strategies used by leaders to manage the emotional impact of change and identify what practices support emotional containment. Central to the study was a nine-month observation of a child care organisation (Liffey View). Funding reductions in response to austerity emerged as the change event having the greatest impact, strategies to manage funding cuts (team restructuring, reductions in salary) evoked emotions of loss, despair and anger towards external funding bodies. In fact, austerity challenged the very survival of Liffey View Children’s home. The findings highlight how emotional containment supported the organisation to manage the impact of austerity. Containment is linked to the capacity of residential leaders to hold and work with emotion, providing structures (e.g. team meetings) that allow teams to make sense of emotion and finding ways to influence relationships with funding agencies. However, containment on its own is not sufficient to lead change, learning gained through containment needs to be linked to action and the theory of emotional containment is enhanced by integrating thinking from leadership and strategy. A framework integrating thinking from emotional containment and wider management theory is offered as a tool for leading change and for leadership development in residential child care.

Subjects/Keywords: 362.73; Austerity; organisational change; Emotional containment; psychodynamics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Melaugh, B. T. (2016). Managing austerity : emotional containment in a residential children's home under threat. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Bath. Retrieved from https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/studentthesis/managing-austerity-emotional-containment-in-a-residential-childrens-home-under-threat(490622b6-e87c-4694-a86f-dba786c9ac77).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.707594

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Melaugh, Brian Thomas. “Managing austerity : emotional containment in a residential children's home under threat.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Bath. Accessed November 24, 2020. https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/studentthesis/managing-austerity-emotional-containment-in-a-residential-childrens-home-under-threat(490622b6-e87c-4694-a86f-dba786c9ac77).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.707594.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Melaugh, Brian Thomas. “Managing austerity : emotional containment in a residential children's home under threat.” 2016. Web. 24 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Melaugh BT. Managing austerity : emotional containment in a residential children's home under threat. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Bath; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 24]. Available from: https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/studentthesis/managing-austerity-emotional-containment-in-a-residential-childrens-home-under-threat(490622b6-e87c-4694-a86f-dba786c9ac77).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.707594.

Council of Science Editors:

Melaugh BT. Managing austerity : emotional containment in a residential children's home under threat. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Bath; 2016. Available from: https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/studentthesis/managing-austerity-emotional-containment-in-a-residential-childrens-home-under-threat(490622b6-e87c-4694-a86f-dba786c9ac77).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.707594


University of Pretoria

3. [No author]. Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training .

Degree: 2007, University of Pretoria

This study seeks to explore students’ subjective and collective experience of an experiential family therapy module within the Clinical Psychology Masters training programme. It looks at the perceptions of nine trainee therapists who used genograms and family sculpting to present their family of origin. The study takes place after the completion of the practical internship year with the purpose of exploring relevant emotional, cognitive, social and therapeutic effects of this module. A literature survey reveals that the use of genograms and family sculpting during training has received little research interest as most studies have primarily focused on their use during therapy with clients and in supervision. There is a scarcity of literature available that pertains directly to psychologists themselves and their wider social context. An exploratory review has been made to supplement the literature and pertains to experiential programmes in training in general and the psychologist’s self in training. The epistemology that directs this research falls within a postmodern frame. The experience is viewed from within the broad systems perspective. This approach acknowledges the dynamic and recursive interactions which occur between and within systems, and permits a broad perspective to be taken that is inclusive rather than exclusive. A qualitative research design was selected as it lends itself particularly well to the study of the ‘lived realities’ of people within their context and allows the information gained from the study to guide the research process. Semi-structured open-ended in-depth interviews were used as they allow for greater freedom and fewer restrictions regarding direction for the participant. A thematic analysis was carried out in order for the central themes of the experience to emerge. These themes were discussed extensively and integrated with the literature available. The multigenerational family presentation seems to create greater awareness of patterns and roles and these insights have a pervasive impact in many contexts. Understandably, the trainees feel emotionally overwhelmed as they become both observer and observed, viewing their interaction from a third-person perspective. This awareness of process results in a loss of spontaneous response and initial debilitation which is associated with feelings of loss and isolation. The self-exploratory behaviour gives rise to a reflexive reconstruction of self as a result of the access to new meanings regarding the dynamics and relationships within the family system, which enhances understanding of the complex interplay of systems, and ultimately facilitates the processes of integration, repair and resolution. Advisors/Committee Members: Ms A Cramer (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Feedback; Containment; Vicarious learning; Insight; Isolation; Individuation/differentiation of self; Self-direction; Systems theory; Emotional autonomy; Cybernetics.; Experiential training; Family of origin; Family sculpting; Genogram; UCTD

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (2007). Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training . (Masters Thesis). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-10042006-162423/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training .” 2007. Masters Thesis, University of Pretoria. Accessed November 24, 2020. http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-10042006-162423/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training .” 2007. Web. 24 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

author] [. Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2007. [cited 2020 Nov 24]. Available from: http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-10042006-162423/.

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. Seeing the wood for the trees : the experience of genograms and family sculpting during clinical psychology masters training . [Masters Thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2007. Available from: http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-10042006-162423/

.