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You searched for subject:(Emerging sign languages). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. -8926-1669. Sign order and argument structure in a Peruvian home sign system.

Degree: MA, Linguistics, 2016, University of Texas – Austin

Home sign systems are gestural communication systems that arise when a deaf child is deprived of manual communication, but not social interaction. Yet, despite not having conventional linguistic input, the sign systems developed by such children have been found to exhibit many properties of natural language. In this paper, I examine the productions of RCM, a 28-year-old deaf home signer, and his three most common interlocutors, all living in Nueva Vida, a village in Peruvian Amazonia. According to his parents, RCM has never spoken and has used gestural communication since childhood. Neither RCM nor anyone within the community have been exposed to a conventional sign language. However, RCM's family and friends gesture with him to communicate. Analysis focused on the use of spatial modulation and sign order in argument structure and negation for all four signers, comparing consistency both internal to the signer and across signers. I found that RCM produces a consistent sign order for transitive constructions, intransitive constructions and negation. RCM used sign order to mark semantic role contrasts. He produced two different lexical negation signs to mark three types of grammatical negation. The ordering of semantic arguments and negation was matched in almost all cases by the three hearing interlocutors. Although RCM had a consistent and productive means of assigning arguments, he also employed space in a class of signs that can be classified as `directional verbs'. These action signs marked the patient or recipient through movement. In addition to spatial modulation, he assigned referents to abstract space and was able to refer back to these referents using points or spatial modulation. All three hearing signers were found to use some degree of spatial modulation. However, the degree to which the hearing signers were capable of using abstract space varied across signers. I showed that RCM is the innovator of these structures and that the hearing signers learned the structures from RCM. Advisors/Committee Members: Meier, Richard P. (advisor), Quinto-Pozos, David (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Linguistics; Sign language; Emerging sign languages; Home sign

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APA (6th Edition):

-8926-1669. (2016). Sign order and argument structure in a Peruvian home sign system. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/45731

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Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-8926-1669. “Sign order and argument structure in a Peruvian home sign system.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/45731.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-8926-1669. “Sign order and argument structure in a Peruvian home sign system.” 2016. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-8926-1669. Sign order and argument structure in a Peruvian home sign system. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/45731.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-8926-1669. Sign order and argument structure in a Peruvian home sign system. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/45731

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Texas – Austin

2. -8926-1669. Lexical conventionalization and the emergence of grammatical devices in a second generation homesign system in Peru.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2019, University of Texas – Austin

This dissertation is the study of a sign system used by the Máíjùnà, an indigenous community in the Peruvian Amazon. The properties of the signing community are not characteristic of either a prototypical homesigning community or a village sign language. The signing community consists of two deaf individuals (RCM and ST) and their hearing friends and family. The socio-cultural features of this sign system, which fall between that of a homesign system and a village sign language, can inform us of how community structure and the interaction between hearing and deaf signers affect language emergence. This question is explore through a grammatical analysis of RCM's system and a lexical analysis of both RCM's and ST's systems. There are two main goals of this dissertation: 1) To describe the grammatical and lexical features of the sign system and 2) To explore how the socio-cultural features of the community contribute to the emergence and maintenance of the sign system. These goals were approached through a variety of data collection methods. To describe the grammar and the lexicon, both traditional elicitation methods and conversational data were used to support findings. The grammatical analysis focussed on argument structure and use of grammatical space in RCM's system. RCM did not produce consistent word order to mark arguments, but he did consistently use spatial modulation for this purpose. The elicitation analysis was supported by the conversational data, showing that this was not a product of the elicitation method. Data from hearing signers in the community were also analyzed. They produced highly consistent word order, but their productions of spatial modulation were less sophisticated than those of RCM, suggesting that RCM innovated the grammatical structure in his system. The analysis of the lexicon includes detailed assessments of form and consistency between RCM and ST. An in-depth analysis of the consistency between the deaf signers and the hearing signers in the two communities was completed. Through this analysis, additional features of the lexicon are discussed, such as semantic extensions and the role of iconicity in sign form. It was found that, despite living in different villages and having only sporadic contact with each other, RCM and ST were highly consistent with each other and the hearing signers in both villages. These results were then investigated further by exploring the possible shared influences between RCM and ST in order to account for the high lexical consistency. Three experiments were conducted on iconicity, gesture and the lexicons of unrelated homesigners. These experiments showed that only a small portion of RCM's and ST's shared lexicon is likely due to these shared influences. The results suggest, then, that the two are signers of a single, multi-generation homesign system, rather than two separate homesign systems. Advisors/Committee Members: Meier, Richard P. (advisor), Quinto-Pozos, David (committee member), Law, Danny (committee member), Epps, Patience (committee member), Streek, Jürgen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Sign language; Homesign; Home sign; Emerging languages; Language emergence; Spatial modulation; Community sign language; Village sign language

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-8926-1669. (2019). Lexical conventionalization and the emergence of grammatical devices in a second generation homesign system in Peru. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3230

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-8926-1669. “Lexical conventionalization and the emergence of grammatical devices in a second generation homesign system in Peru.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3230.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-8926-1669. “Lexical conventionalization and the emergence of grammatical devices in a second generation homesign system in Peru.” 2019. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-8926-1669. Lexical conventionalization and the emergence of grammatical devices in a second generation homesign system in Peru. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3230.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-8926-1669. Lexical conventionalization and the emergence of grammatical devices in a second generation homesign system in Peru. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3230

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


Leiden University

3. Asghari, Nargess. Iconicity in the Semantic Domain of Animals in the Emerging Family Sign Language of Berbey (Mali).

Degree: 2019, Leiden University

Cross-linguistic studies have shown that despite variations across languages, universal patterns are found within semantic domains. In sign language linguistics, cross-linguistic studies of the iconic patterns per semantic domain have received major attention in recent years. This study investigates iconicity in the semantic domain of animals in Berbey Sign Language – an emerging family sign language in Mali – and compares it to 10 other sign languages. The results of the analysis of the iconic strategies and iconic image in 10 animal signs reveal notable patterns. An overview of the universal tendencies found in the semantic domain of animals is included in the study as well. Advisors/Committee Members: Nyst, Victoria (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: emerging sign languages; iconicity; semantic fields; semantic domains; animal terms; animals; African sign languages; Mali; sign language; folk biology; patterned iconicity; nomenclature and classification; taxonomy; iconic image; iconic strategy; rural sign languages; family sign languages

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Asghari, N. (2019). Iconicity in the Semantic Domain of Animals in the Emerging Family Sign Language of Berbey (Mali). (Masters Thesis). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/70449

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Asghari, Nargess. “Iconicity in the Semantic Domain of Animals in the Emerging Family Sign Language of Berbey (Mali).” 2019. Masters Thesis, Leiden University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/70449.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Asghari, Nargess. “Iconicity in the Semantic Domain of Animals in the Emerging Family Sign Language of Berbey (Mali).” 2019. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Asghari N. Iconicity in the Semantic Domain of Animals in the Emerging Family Sign Language of Berbey (Mali). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Leiden University; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/70449.

Council of Science Editors:

Asghari N. Iconicity in the Semantic Domain of Animals in the Emerging Family Sign Language of Berbey (Mali). [Masters Thesis]. Leiden University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/70449

.