Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Electrodynamic energy harvesting). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Oklahoma

1. Wang, Huiyu. Analytical and computational modeling of multiphase flow in ferrofluid charged oscillating heat pipes.

Degree: PhD, 2020, University of Oklahoma

Electromagnetic-based energy harvesting materials and devices have emerged as a prominent research area in the last ten years, especially systems using ferrofluidic induction—a process that generates voltage via the pulsation of a ferrofluid (iron-based nanofluid) through a solenoid. This work includes the development of an analytical model and computational modeling methods to investigate ferrofluid pulsating flow within an energy harvesting device and the mass and heat transfer performance of a two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) and oscillating heat pipe (OHP). First, an analytical model is proposed to predict the induced electromotive force (EMF) based on the flow behavior and magnetic properties of a pulsating ferrofluid energy harvesting device. The model identifies key parameters for describing and optimizing induction for ferrofluid pulsing through a solenoid. Data from a previously documented experimental study was used to validate the analytical model, and both the experimental data and analytical model show the same trends with the induced EMF increasing as a function of pulsating frequency and magnetic field strength as a higher percentage of the ferrofluid nanoparticle moments are aligned. Second, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to predict the heat transfer performance of a TPCT. Simulations were performed using a three-dimensional finite-volume flow solver (ANSYS Fluent) with a pressure-based scheme for the solution of the continuity and momentum equations, volume-of-fluid method for resolution of the liquid-vapor phase interface, and a temperature-dependent model for interphase mass transfer by evaporation and condensation. Different model and numerical scheme combinations were investigated to identify an efficient and consistently accurate method using currently available software tools. To address issues with previously published simulation methods violating the conservation of mass, a new variable saturation temperature model was tested along with mass transfer coefficients based on the vapor-liquid density ratio and more physically realistic boundary conditions. The variable saturation temperature model significantly mitigated mass and energy imbalance in the simulations, for both constant heat flux and convection condenser boundary conditions. In addition, for the VOF discretization the Geo-Reconstruct scheme was found to be more accurate than the Compressive scheme available in Fluent without additional computational cost. Third, simulations of a vertical OHP were performed using the CFD methodology developed for the TPCT system. Results show simulations using appropriate values for the evaporation and condensation mass transfer time relaxation parameters and the new variable saturation temperature model are in good agreement with the available experimental data. For the OHP system, using the Compressive discretization scheme for the VOF model allowed for computationally efficient simulation. It is believed that the advances in analytical and computational modeling… Advisors/Committee Members: Walters, D. Keith (advisor), Walters, Keisha B. (advisor), Ruyle, Jessica E. (committee member), Shabgard, Hamidreza (committee member), Vedula, Prakash (committee member), Garg, Jivtesh (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Heat Transfer; Computational fluid dynamics (CFD); Electrodynamic energy harvesting

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wang, H. (2020). Analytical and computational modeling of multiphase flow in ferrofluid charged oscillating heat pipes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324967

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Huiyu. “Analytical and computational modeling of multiphase flow in ferrofluid charged oscillating heat pipes.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324967.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Huiyu. “Analytical and computational modeling of multiphase flow in ferrofluid charged oscillating heat pipes.” 2020. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Wang H. Analytical and computational modeling of multiphase flow in ferrofluid charged oscillating heat pipes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2020. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324967.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang H. Analytical and computational modeling of multiphase flow in ferrofluid charged oscillating heat pipes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324967


Penn State University

2. McTernan, Jesse Kane. DEVELOPMENT OF A MODELING CAPABILITY FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MODULES IN ELECTRODYNAMIC TETHER SYSTEMS .

Degree: 2011, Penn State University

Electrodynamic tethers can be used to harvest energy onboard a spacecraft orbiting the Earth or any planetary body with a magnetic field and surrounding plasma. The motion of the conductive tether in the Earth’s magnetic field generates an electromotive force along the length of the tether. The ionospheric plasma completes the circuit to allow current to flow through the tether and, ultimately, through the energy-handling components on the spacecraft. This energy can be used immediately or stored in batteries, capacitors, flywheels, or other storage devices. As current flows through the tether, the spacecraft loses altitude due to the electrodynamic force created by the flow of electrons in the magnetic field. One can think of the electrodynamic tether system as transforming orbital potential energy into electrical energy. The system can regain the lost altitude by forcing current to flow against the generated electromotive force, creating a thrust in the direction of motion. Electrodynamic tether systems can augment a spacecraft’s performance or enable capabilities that were previously unobtainable, such as energy harvesting while in the Earth’s shadow. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the feasibility, performance, trade-offs, and net benefit of electrodynamic-tether power generation for space missions. Specific objectives included creating system concepts for various classes and sizes of spacecraft, characterizing efficiencies, and comparing alternative storage technologies. Our research has found that large satellites have the potential to harvest as much as kilowatts of power at some load. Small electrodynamic tether systems the size of CubeSats have the potential to harvest 50% more energy than solar panel systems alone and can produce over 40-watts-average power useful during, for example, a 10-minute ground station overpass. An energy storage module was added to our simulation software that models physical storage devices, such as supercapacitors and lithium–ion batteries, and a generic device. It also investigates orbital energy concepts such as in-plane energy changes, energy needed to torque an orbit, and the conservation of energy as orbital energy is transferred into electrical energy. In spite of the enhanced capabilities provided to orbiting spacecraft by electrodynamic tether systems, significant research remains to realize the promise of electrodynamic tether systems as a unique solution to the energy needs of satellites. Advisors/Committee Members: Sven G Bilen, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, Sven G Bilen, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: debris mitigation; orbital energy; enrgy harvesting; energy; space tether; electrodynamic tether; propulsion

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McTernan, J. K. (2011). DEVELOPMENT OF A MODELING CAPABILITY FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MODULES IN ELECTRODYNAMIC TETHER SYSTEMS . (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12063

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McTernan, Jesse Kane. “DEVELOPMENT OF A MODELING CAPABILITY FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MODULES IN ELECTRODYNAMIC TETHER SYSTEMS .” 2011. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed February 26, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12063.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McTernan, Jesse Kane. “DEVELOPMENT OF A MODELING CAPABILITY FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MODULES IN ELECTRODYNAMIC TETHER SYSTEMS .” 2011. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

McTernan JK. DEVELOPMENT OF A MODELING CAPABILITY FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MODULES IN ELECTRODYNAMIC TETHER SYSTEMS . [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2011. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12063.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McTernan JK. DEVELOPMENT OF A MODELING CAPABILITY FOR ENERGY HARVESTING MODULES IN ELECTRODYNAMIC TETHER SYSTEMS . [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2011. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/12063

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Florida

3. Rao, Yuan. Input-Powered Interface Circuits for Electrodynamic Vibrational Energy Harvesting Systems.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2013, University of Florida

Vibrational energy harvesting systems that convert ambient mechanical energy in the environment to usable electrical energy represent a promising emerging technology to achieve autonomous, self-renewable, and maintenance-free operation of wireless electronic devices and systems. Typical energy harvesting systems are composed of three components: an energy harvester that converts the mechanical vibrations into electrical energy, an interface circuit that conditions and regulates the energy, and an electronic load that uses or stores the harvested energy. This dissertation specifically focuses on the development and experimental characterization of input-powered energy harvesting circuits, including ac/dc converters and a dc/dc converter, for electrodynamic vibrational energy harvesters. This input-powered feature allows the active interface circuitry to automatically enter a zero-power-consumption standby mode when the voltage from the harvester is below a threshold level, thus eliminating any energy drain between energy harvesting cycles. Implemented in a 0.5 µm CMOS technology, the interface circuit is bench-top characterized with a sine wave signal generator and also with real vibrational energy harvesters. The measurement result shows that the minimum input threshold voltage is 1 V at open-load. When the ac input amplitude is 2.6 V and regulated dc output is 3.7 V, the interface circuit can achieve a peak net efficiency of 61% with 16.7 mW of output power delivered. A simplified equivalent circuit model for a resonant-type electrodynamic energy harvesting system is developed including a lumped element model (LEM) for the resonant harvester, a simplified interface circuit model, and a load model. The overall system model is validated via comparison of circuit simulations with experimental measurements. Lastly, a complete and fully self-sufficient energy harvesting system is demonstrated using the input-powered interface circuit and a non-resonant electrodynamic harvester, designed specifically for harvesting energy from human movements. Tested under normal human activities (walking, jogging, cycling), the 70 cm3 system is shown to charge a 3.7 V rechargeable battery with an average power of 234 µW during jogging. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Arnold, David P (committee chair), Nishida, Toshikazu (committee member), Bashirullah, Rizwan (committee member), Sodano, Henry (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Amplitude; Comparators; Crop harvesting; Diodes; Electric potential; Electrodynamics; Energy; Inductors; Power efficiency; Vibration; converter  – electrodynamic  – energy  – harvesting  – human  – input  – powered  – vibration

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rao, Y. (2013). Input-Powered Interface Circuits for Electrodynamic Vibrational Energy Harvesting Systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045301

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rao, Yuan. “Input-Powered Interface Circuits for Electrodynamic Vibrational Energy Harvesting Systems.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed February 26, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045301.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rao, Yuan. “Input-Powered Interface Circuits for Electrodynamic Vibrational Energy Harvesting Systems.” 2013. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Rao Y. Input-Powered Interface Circuits for Electrodynamic Vibrational Energy Harvesting Systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045301.

Council of Science Editors:

Rao Y. Input-Powered Interface Circuits for Electrodynamic Vibrational Energy Harvesting Systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045301

.