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You searched for subject:(Effort Justification). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manitoba

1. Assadi, Peyman. The truth about the IKEA effect: when labor does not lead to love.

Degree: Management, 2014, University of Manitoba

Managers’ increased interest in exploiting consumers’ labor in cook-your-own-food restaurants and harvest-your-own-vegetable fields is theoretically rooted in a stream of research called effort justification. For many years, research centered on effort justification has focused on the relationship between the effort one puts into a task and the resultant valuation of the task’s outcome arguing that effort increases the favorable valuation (e.g. Aronson and Mills 1959; Alessandri, Darcheville, and Zentall 2008; Lydall, Gilmour, and Dwyer 2010; and Norton, Mochon, Ariely 2012). However, little research has focused on the inverse phenomenon where the effort does not result in a heightened favorable valuation of the outcome. Extending the previous findings, it is asserted that effort does not always increase the favorable valuation of the outcome and it happens only when the effort is not a threatening factor to one’s resources. Results from three studies, one pretest and two main studies, show that threatening labor, the one that is coupled with expectation disconfirmation, reduces the favorable variation of the outcome, while non-threatening labor increases the favorable valuation. Advisors/Committee Members: Main, Kelley (Marketing) (supervisor), Manchanda, Rajesh (Marketing) Neville, Lukas (Business Administration) Strachan, Shaelyn (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: Effort Justification; IKEA Effect

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APA (6th Edition):

Assadi, P. (2014). The truth about the IKEA effect: when labor does not lead to love. (Masters Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23734

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Assadi, Peyman. “The truth about the IKEA effect: when labor does not lead to love.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23734.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Assadi, Peyman. “The truth about the IKEA effect: when labor does not lead to love.” 2014. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Assadi P. The truth about the IKEA effect: when labor does not lead to love. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23734.

Council of Science Editors:

Assadi P. The truth about the IKEA effect: when labor does not lead to love. [Masters Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23734


University of Toledo

2. Lee, Jennifer E. Work Ethic in Rats.

Degree: MA, College of Arts and Sciences, 2009, University of Toledo

This study examined the effects of different degrees of effort on presumptive subjective reward value in rats. Effort was varied by requiring different numbers of lever presses preceding discrimination tasks. In training, a simple simultaneous discrimination followed a single lever press after the presentation of an initial stimulus (S+, FR1 vs. S-, FR1) and a different simple simultaneous discrimination followed 10 lever presses to the initial stimulus (S+, FR10 vs. S-, FR10). An omnibus analysis of preferences in testing indicated that stimuli that followed greater effort were not preferred over stimuli that followed less effort in training. This replication of Clement, Feltus, Kaiser, and Zentall's (2000) study of pigeons investigated an effect analogous to the phenomenon known as justification of effort in social psychology. Advisors/Committee Members: Armus, Harvard (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; justification of effort; work ethic; animals; rats; learning; discrimination; stimulus preference

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, J. E. (2009). Work Ethic in Rats. (Masters Thesis). University of Toledo. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=toledo1264716770

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Jennifer E. “Work Ethic in Rats.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Toledo. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=toledo1264716770.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Jennifer E. “Work Ethic in Rats.” 2009. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lee JE. Work Ethic in Rats. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toledo; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=toledo1264716770.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee JE. Work Ethic in Rats. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toledo; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=toledo1264716770

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