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You searched for subject:(EQAO testing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Toronto

1. Eizadirad, Ardavan. Assessment as Stereotyping: Experiences of Racialized Children and Parents with the Grade 3 EQAO Standardized Testing Preparation and Administration in Ontario.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Toronto

This exploratory qualitative study uses Critical Theory, specifically Critical Race Theory, to examine the subjective experiences of racialized children and parents with the Grade 3 EQAO standardized testing preparation and administration in Ontario, Canada. Standardized testing as a tool for measuring accountability in schools was introduced in 1996 by the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) which is an arm’s length agency of the Ministry of Education. Each year EQAO assesses students in publicly funded schools in Grades 3, 6, 9, and 10 focusing on numeracy and literacy using criterion-referenced standardized tests to provide an independent gauge of students’ learning and achievement. Data was collected via audio and video recording of semi-structured interviews with eight Grade 3 children and their parent(s). Although there are research studies conducted on EQAO testing, majority has been at the secondary level. Insights from this study contributes to filling in the gap in the field by focusing on EQAO testing in elementary schools and how it impacts racialized children and parents whose voices are often silenced within educational settings due to systemic barriers. Eight findings emerged through focused coding and thematic analysis. Findings indicate the way the Grade 3 EQAO standardized test is prepared for and administered is more harmful than beneficial. The harmful impact of standardized testing is identified under the umbrella term invisible scars and traumatizing effects of standardized testing particularly how EQAO testing marginalizes racialized children and those from lower socio economic backgrounds. Identifying external assessment as stereotyping, it is argued EQAO tests are culturally and racially biased as it promotes a Eurocentric curriculum and way of life privileging white students and those from higher socio-economic status. A shift from equality to an equity approach is recommended to tackle closing the achievement gap. The achievement gap will not be minimized in a sustainable manner without first addressing inequality of opportunity. Education alone, and quality of education, cannot be judged exclusively through standardized tests and their quantifiable indicators. Children have to be viewed as holistic beings with different social, cognitive, emotional, developmental, spiritual and academic needs.

2019-11-16 00:00:00

Advisors/Committee Members: Trifonas, Peter P, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning.

Subjects/Keywords: accountability; assessment; EQAO; equity; standardized testing; stereotyping; 0288

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Eizadirad, A. (2018). Assessment as Stereotyping: Experiences of Racialized Children and Parents with the Grade 3 EQAO Standardized Testing Preparation and Administration in Ontario. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97778

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eizadirad, Ardavan. “Assessment as Stereotyping: Experiences of Racialized Children and Parents with the Grade 3 EQAO Standardized Testing Preparation and Administration in Ontario.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed August 12, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97778.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eizadirad, Ardavan. “Assessment as Stereotyping: Experiences of Racialized Children and Parents with the Grade 3 EQAO Standardized Testing Preparation and Administration in Ontario.” 2018. Web. 12 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Eizadirad A. Assessment as Stereotyping: Experiences of Racialized Children and Parents with the Grade 3 EQAO Standardized Testing Preparation and Administration in Ontario. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2020 Aug 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97778.

Council of Science Editors:

Eizadirad A. Assessment as Stereotyping: Experiences of Racialized Children and Parents with the Grade 3 EQAO Standardized Testing Preparation and Administration in Ontario. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97778

2. Toomey, Nisha. Literacy on Lockdown: An Ethnographic Experience in English Assessment .

Degree: 2011, University of Ottawa

This research explores literacy as a medium for deepening student's awareness of their world and the impact of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Standardized testing is analyzed as a fundamental paradigm to our school culture. Ethnography is explored as a method for describing one group of students and their teacher as they prepare for the OSSLT. The findings conclude that the test occupies time, dominates definitions of literacy and undermines student and teacher agency. The conclusion considers reasons for why we seem to accept a testing paradigm that may be a direct affront to democratic practice in schools.

Subjects/Keywords: Education in Ontario; EQAO; Ethnography; Standardized testing; Critical literacy; Multiple literacies; Critical pedagogy

…contributed to the ethos and inception of standardized testing in our culture, followed by the… …rationale of the OSSLT as explained by the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO… …preliminary summary of the literature surrounding standardized testing and the OSSLT… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Toomey, N. (2011). Literacy on Lockdown: An Ethnographic Experience in English Assessment . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/20470

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Toomey, Nisha. “Literacy on Lockdown: An Ethnographic Experience in English Assessment .” 2011. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed August 12, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/20470.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Toomey, Nisha. “Literacy on Lockdown: An Ethnographic Experience in English Assessment .” 2011. Web. 12 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Toomey N. Literacy on Lockdown: An Ethnographic Experience in English Assessment . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2011. [cited 2020 Aug 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/20470.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Toomey N. Literacy on Lockdown: An Ethnographic Experience in English Assessment . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/20470

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Toronto

3. Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.

Degree: 2009, University of Toronto

This study is an interpretive form of qualitative research that is founded in educational connoisseurship and criticism, which uses the author’s personal experiences as a holistic educator in a public school to connect theory and practice. Key research questions include: How do I, as a teacher, work with the Ontario curriculum to make it more holistic? What strategies have I developed in order to teach a more holistic curriculum? What kinds of difficulties interfere with my practice as I attempt to implement my holistic philosophy of education? This dissertation seeks to articulate a methodology for developing holistic curriculum that is in conformity with Ontario Ministry guidelines and is also responsive to the multifaceted needs of the whole student. The research findings will serve to inform teachers who wish to engage in holistic education in public schools and adopt a curriculum that is transformative while still being adaptable within mainstream education.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Miller, John P., Cohen, Rina, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning.

Subjects/Keywords: holistic education; holistic learning; holistic teacher; holistic curriculum; curriculum development; Ontario curriculum; transformative curriculum; holistic philosophy of education; developing mindfulness; meditation in schools; visualization as a learning tool; yoga in schools; journal writing; Gulu walk; An Inconvenient Truth; Uganda Rising; anti-bullying education; human wholeness; Whole Child School; personal development; professional development; personal practical knowledge in teachers; educational connoisseurship and criticism; empowering students; Math trail; pedagogical approaches; autobiography; parents as partners in education; EQAO testing; student-led conferences; self awareness; balance in education; limited vision of Ontario curriculum; tensions between Holistic education and the Ontario curriculum; critical literacy ideology; ommission on the Whole Child; spirituality in education; anecdotal reporting to parents; social consciousness; Roots of Empathy; Who is Nobody; spiritual growth; ecological awareness; wholeness of human experience; creativity and intuition in education; 0727; 0524; 0280; 0998

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Neves, A. C. T. (2009). A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. “A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed August 12, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. “A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.” 2009. Web. 12 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Neves ACT. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. [cited 2020 Aug 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107.

Council of Science Editors:

Neves ACT. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107

.