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Florida International University

1. Mowell, Barry D. Degree and Patterns of Formal NGO Participation within the United Nations Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC): An Appraisal of NGO Consultative Status Relative to Political Pluralism.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2017, Florida International University

The United Nations (UN) has invested increasing levels of effort in recent decades to cultivate a more effective, diverse and democratic institutional culture via the inclusion of and interaction among international civil society organizations (CSOs) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to supplement the traditional role of states as the primary transnational actors. The principle vehicle for the UN-civil society dynamic is the consultative status (CS) program within the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), wherein a diverse range of nearly 5,000 transnational organizations ostensibly participate. This research examined patterns of participation and the nature/level of CSO/NGO involvement within the UN, with particular focus upon ECOSOC. In examining participation patterns, the research identified patterns related to geographical/proportional representation among developed and developing regions and world regions in general and also as related to policy/issue areas represented. In terms of involvement, the research sought to assess the types and degree of contributions being made by CSOs/NGOs in association with the UN. To address both areas, the research employed a two-prong methodology including (1) a detailed analysis of the UN’s online integrated Civil Society Organizations (iCSO) database and (2) a comprehensive survey questionnaire mailed to a randomly-selected sample of 10% of all organizations holding consultative status with UN-ECOSOC. The findings challenge the assumption that UN association with international civil society has realized pluralist ideals in that substantial variations were found to exist in the representation of policy/issue areas, with some areas far better represented than others. Perhaps more importantly, the research revealed that only a minority of organizations in the ECOSOC-CS program appear to be actively/regularly engaged with the UN, with a large minority of CS-accredited organizations engaged only periodically or to a more limited extent, and a substantial minority not participating/interacting in any way. Rather than exemplifying pluralism within the constructivist tradition, findings imply support for liberal institutionalist theories in that decades-long expansion of IGO influence has facilitated a corollary expectation of expanding international civil society and an associated expectation of linkages between transnational governance and democratic institutions on the one hand and transnational civil society on the other as a standardized norm. Advisors/Committee Members: Markus Thiel, Eduardo Gamarra, Milena Neshkova, Susanne Zwingel.

Subjects/Keywords: civil society; CSOs; ECOSOC; IGOs; non-state actors; NGOs; pluralism; transnational civil society; United Nations; UN consultative status; Comparative Politics; International Relations; Leadership Studies; Other International and Area Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mowell, B. D. (2017). Degree and Patterns of Formal NGO Participation within the United Nations Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC): An Appraisal of NGO Consultative Status Relative to Political Pluralism. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3213 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001757 ; FIDC001757

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mowell, Barry D. “Degree and Patterns of Formal NGO Participation within the United Nations Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC): An Appraisal of NGO Consultative Status Relative to Political Pluralism.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed July 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3213 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001757 ; FIDC001757.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mowell, Barry D. “Degree and Patterns of Formal NGO Participation within the United Nations Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC): An Appraisal of NGO Consultative Status Relative to Political Pluralism.” 2017. Web. 08 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Mowell BD. Degree and Patterns of Formal NGO Participation within the United Nations Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC): An Appraisal of NGO Consultative Status Relative to Political Pluralism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3213 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001757 ; FIDC001757.

Council of Science Editors:

Mowell BD. Degree and Patterns of Formal NGO Participation within the United Nations Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC): An Appraisal of NGO Consultative Status Relative to Political Pluralism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2017. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3213 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC001757 ; FIDC001757


Universiteit Utrecht

2. Tunnissen, M. Wie betaalt, bepaalt? Het democratisch gehalte van mondiaal sociaal-economisch beleid.

Degree: 2010, Universiteit Utrecht

Het belang van internationale financiële instituties wordt steeds groter. Of het nu gaat om het heffen van een bankenbelasting, het aanleggen van een ‘groene muur’ langs de Sahara of het ontkoppelen van de Chinese Yuan van de Amerikaanse Dollar, het wordt allemaal besloten in internationale instellingen. Vanuit de hele wereld worden de geluiden steeds sterker dat men graag ziet dat de instellingen die dit allemaal bepalen meer democratisch worden. Het is op dit moment volgens velen niet transparanti genoeg en bovendien zijn het de rijke landen die de dienst uitmaken. In Wie betaalt, bepaalt? wordt daarom onderzocht of de creatie van een Economic Security Council bij de Verenigde Naties het democratisch gehalte van mondiaal sociaal-economisch beleid kan verhogen. De Wereldbank, het Interantionaal Monetair Fonds , de Groep van 20 en het voorstel voor een Economic and Social Security Council worden onder de loep genomen en beoordeeld op hun democratisch gehalte. Wie betaalt, bepaalt? is de scriptie van Michiel Tunnissen voor het behalen van zijn Master Bestuur & Beleid aan de Utrechtse School voor Bestuurs- en Organisatiewetenschap, Universiteit Utrecht. Advisors/Committee Members: Brandsma, Dr., Yesilkagit, Dr..

Subjects/Keywords: Verenigde Naties; VN; United Nations; UN; G20; G-20; Groep van 20; Economic Security Council; World Bank; IMF; Wereldbank; Internationaal Monetrair Fonds; ECOSOC; Economic and Social Council; Economic and Social Security Council; democracy; governance; measuring democracy; democratisch gehalte; sociaal-economisch beleid.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tunnissen, M. (2010). Wie betaalt, bepaalt? Het democratisch gehalte van mondiaal sociaal-economisch beleid. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/187206

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tunnissen, M. “Wie betaalt, bepaalt? Het democratisch gehalte van mondiaal sociaal-economisch beleid.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed July 08, 2020. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/187206.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tunnissen, M. “Wie betaalt, bepaalt? Het democratisch gehalte van mondiaal sociaal-economisch beleid.” 2010. Web. 08 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Tunnissen M. Wie betaalt, bepaalt? Het democratisch gehalte van mondiaal sociaal-economisch beleid. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 08]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/187206.

Council of Science Editors:

Tunnissen M. Wie betaalt, bepaalt? Het democratisch gehalte van mondiaal sociaal-economisch beleid. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2010. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/187206

3. Kinuthia, Wanyee. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .

Degree: 2013, University of Ottawa

This thesis draws on David Harvey’s concept of “accumulation by dispossession” and an international political economy (IPE) approach centred on the institutional arrangements and power structures that privilege certain actors and values, in order to critique current capitalist practices of primitive accumulation by the global corporate extractive industry. The thesis examines how accumulation by dispossession by the global extractive industry is facilitated by the “free entry” or “free mining” principle. It does so by focusing on Canada as a leader in the global extractive industry and the spread of this country’s mining laws to other countries – in other words, the transnationalisation of norms in the global extractive industry – so as to maintain a consistent and familiar operating environment for Canadian extractive companies. The transnationalisation of norms is further promoted by key international institutions such as the World Bank, which is also the world’s largest development lender and also plays a key role in shaping the regulations that govern natural resource extraction. The thesis briefly investigates some Canadian examples of resource extraction projects, in order to demonstrate the weaknesses of Canadian mining laws, particularly the lack of protection of landowners’ rights under the free entry system and the subsequent need for “free, prior and informed consent” (FPIC). The thesis also considers some of the challenges to the adoption and implementation of the right to FPIC. These challenges include embedded institutional structures like the free entry mining system, international political economy (IPE) as shaped by international institutions and powerful corporations, as well as concerns regarding ‘local’ power structures or the legitimacy of representatives of communities affected by extractive projects. The thesis concludes that in order for Canada to be truly recognized as a leader in the global extractive industry, it must establish legal norms domestically to ensure that Canadian mining companies and residents can be held accountable when there is evidence of environmental and/or human rights violations associated with the activities of Canadian mining companies abroad. The thesis also concludes that Canada needs to address underlying structural issues such as the free entry mining system and implement FPIC, in order to curb “accumulation by dispossession” by the extractive industry, both domestically and abroad.

Subjects/Keywords: natural resources; raw materials; global extractive industry; mining; accumulation by dispossession; primitive accumulation; resource curse; free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC); consultation; free entry; Bill C-300; Omnibus Bill; self-determination; madaraka; multinational / transnational corporations; land grabs; governance gap; enforcement vacuum; regulatory gap; landlessness; involuntary resettlement; displacement; liberalization; financial markets; capitalism; International Monetary Fund (IMF); Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability (CNCA); Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA); Impact and Benefits Agreement (IBA); corporate social responsibility (CSR); international political economy (IPE); Washington Consensus; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP); sustainable development; rare earth; oil; fossil fuels; Whitehorse Mining Initiative (WMI); foreign direct investment (FDI); privatization; Canadian Centre for the Study of Resource Conflict (CCSRC); Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade (SCFAIT); Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD); neoliberal / corporate globalization; Northern Gateway pipeline project; Ring of Fire; centre-periphery; metropolitan-hinterland; Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); Gross Domestic Product (GDP); Extractive Industries Review (EIR); Sub-Saharan Africa; war on terror; terrorists; false flag terrorism; Fisheries Act; Navigable Waters Protection Act; primary goods; aid; Third World debt; free trade; modernization; dependency; tariffs; trade barriers; HudBay; home country liability; state; Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX); Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC); spatio-temporal fix; militarism; Sudbury; Atlantic Canada; Crown; neo-colonialism; industrial revolution; imperialism; public policy; democracy; justice; Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA); Export Development Corporation (EDC); Kimberley Process; International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM); Mining Association of Canada; National Roundtables on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the Canadian Extractive Industry in Developing Countries; equity; austerity measures; Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO); Mining Act reforms; proletariat; aboriginal; Least Developed Countries (LDCs); developing country; comparative advantage; human rights; export-led development; Tiomin; Government of Kenya; Government of Canada; Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC); World Bank Group (WBG); World Trade Organization (WTO); United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP); Bill C-38; Bill C-45; Assembly of First Nations (AFN); Idle No More; meaningful participation; AFRICOM; titanium; Base Resources Australia; House of Commons; conditionalities; Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs); World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kinuthia, W. (2013). “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kinuthia, Wanyee. ““Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .” 2013. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed July 08, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kinuthia, Wanyee. ““Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .” 2013. Web. 08 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Kinuthia W. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kinuthia W. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.