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You searched for subject:(Drug abusers Attitudes). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Mashburn, Jay Hacker. Using the theory of planned behavior to predict Texas community pharmacists' willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected intravenous drug users.

Degree: PhD, Pharmacy, 2003, University of Texas – Austin

The purpose of this dissertation was to use the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to predict Texas community pharmacists’ willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected intravenous drug users (IDUs). The study explored the utility of the TPB constructs (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control) and recent past behavior to predict willingness to provide sterile syringes as well as determined if attitude towards the provision of sterile syringes to known or suspected IDUs differed by gender. A total of 500 surveys, developed from three structured focus groups, were mailed to practicing Texas community pharmacists. An overall response rate of 35.1 percent was obtained. In general, pharmacists were not willing to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected IDUs, held negative attitudes toward the provision of sterile syringes, were somewhat influenced by social norms and perceived to have some control over the provision of sterile syringes. For belief-based measured constructs of the TPB, attitude was the only significant predictor of willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected IDUs. When recent past behavior was entered into the regression model, attitude, subjective norm and recent past behavior were significant predictors. For direct measured constructs of the TPB, attitude and subjective norm were significant predictors of willingness, whereas, attitude, subjective norm and recent past behavior were significant predictors when recent past behavior was entered into the regression model. Overall, recent past behavior contributed significantly to the regression model. Attitude did not differ by gender. Even though subjective norm was a significant predictor when recent past behavior was entered into the regression model for both belief-based and direct measured constructs of the TPB, attitude and recent past behavior were the strongest predictors of willingness. In summary, this study identified factors that partially explain why community pharmacists are willing or not willing to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected IDUs. Attitudes should be targeted to increase community pharmacists’ willingness to provide sterile syringes. Public health officials and pharmacists can then use this information to better position themselves to meet the health needs and expectations of the community. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Carolyn M., Ph. D. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Pharmacists – Texas – Attitudes; Intravenous drug abusers – Texas

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mashburn, J. H. (2003). Using the theory of planned behavior to predict Texas community pharmacists' willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected intravenous drug users. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/759

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mashburn, Jay Hacker. “Using the theory of planned behavior to predict Texas community pharmacists' willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected intravenous drug users.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/759.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mashburn, Jay Hacker. “Using the theory of planned behavior to predict Texas community pharmacists' willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected intravenous drug users.” 2003. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Mashburn JH. Using the theory of planned behavior to predict Texas community pharmacists' willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected intravenous drug users. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2003. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/759.

Council of Science Editors:

Mashburn JH. Using the theory of planned behavior to predict Texas community pharmacists' willingness to provide sterile syringes to known or suspected intravenous drug users. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2003. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/759

2. Gibson, Ben. Does Homophily Predict Similarities In The Frequency Of Heroin Use? An Analysis Of Heroin-Using Dyads.

Degree: 2012, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Recent work in social network analysis has focused on the spread of health behaviors, including smoking, obesity, and exercise, through social networks (Fowler and Christakis 2007, 2008; Centola 2011). Studies suggest that health behaviors are often ""contagious,"" particularly when respondents share similar characteristics, such as race, education, and BMI. In this study, I extend recent work on the spread of health behavior through social networks to a hard-to-study population - heroin users. I aim to compare the frequency of injection (FOI) for dyads of users who share the same race, education, or age (i.e., homophilous ties) versus those who do not share those characteristics (i.e., heterophilous ties). If this population is similar to non-using populations observed in previous studies, connected drug users who share sociodemographic characteristics should also share more similar frequency of injection (FOI). Results show that FOI is distributed through both homophilous and heterophilous ties. Demographic characteristics of individual nodes (i.e. race, age, or education level), is a better determinant of peer influence than dyadic characteristics (i.e. demographic similarity of peers). Disaggregating respondents by race, I show that Hispanics tend to be share similar FOI with their peers (of any race), while blacks do not; I also show that whites share FOI only with peers who are of a different race. Lower-educated users tend to share FOI more often with their peers (of any education) than higher-educated users do. Younger users also tend to share FOI with their peers more so than older users. Future research should check for aggregation bias. Theoretical developments in explaining group differences in the diffusion of health behavior are needed.

MA

1 online resource (viii, 47 pages) :color illustrations

Sociology

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Belinda Needham, Corbetta,Renato Hwang,Sean-Shong.

Subjects/Keywords: Heroin abuse – Social aspects.<; br>; Intravenous drug abusers – Social networks.<; br>; Intravenous drug abusers – Attitudes.<; br>; Heroin abuse – Psychological aspects.<; br>; Dyadic analysis (Social sciences)<; br>; Heroin abuse – Social aspects – New England.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gibson, B. (2012). Does Homophily Predict Similarities In The Frequency Of Heroin Use? An Analysis Of Heroin-Using Dyads. (Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1548

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gibson, Ben. “Does Homophily Predict Similarities In The Frequency Of Heroin Use? An Analysis Of Heroin-Using Dyads.” 2012. Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1548.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gibson, Ben. “Does Homophily Predict Similarities In The Frequency Of Heroin Use? An Analysis Of Heroin-Using Dyads.” 2012. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Gibson B. Does Homophily Predict Similarities In The Frequency Of Heroin Use? An Analysis Of Heroin-Using Dyads. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1548.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gibson B. Does Homophily Predict Similarities In The Frequency Of Heroin Use? An Analysis Of Heroin-Using Dyads. [Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2012. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1548

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

3. Ahmedani, Brian Kenneth. Determinants of stigma : a comparison of health, mental health, and drug use conditions.

Degree: PhD, Social Work, 2010, Michigan State University

Subjects/Keywords: Stigma (Social psychology); Mentally ill – Attitudes; Drug abusers – Attitudes; Medical personnel – Attitudes; Mental health – Public opinion; Drug abuse – Public opinion; Health attitudes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ahmedani, B. K. (2010). Determinants of stigma : a comparison of health, mental health, and drug use conditions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:17554

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ahmedani, Brian Kenneth. “Determinants of stigma : a comparison of health, mental health, and drug use conditions.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan State University. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:17554.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ahmedani, Brian Kenneth. “Determinants of stigma : a comparison of health, mental health, and drug use conditions.” 2010. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Ahmedani BK. Determinants of stigma : a comparison of health, mental health, and drug use conditions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Michigan State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:17554.

Council of Science Editors:

Ahmedani BK. Determinants of stigma : a comparison of health, mental health, and drug use conditions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Michigan State University; 2010. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:17554

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