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You searched for subject:(Drug abuse Scotland). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Stirling

1. Fuller, Nicholas William. Following Ariadne's thread: a qualitative exploration of the relevance of spirituality in experiences of problem substance use and of spiritual engagement in processes of recovery, with particular reference to the experience of men living in Scotland.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Stirling

Aims This study explored the relevance of spirituality to experiences of drug and alcohol addiction and recovery from addiction with specific reference to the experience of men in long-term recovery living in Scotland. Methods The study consisted of two phases. Phase One involved thematic analysis of interviews with individuals representing diverse standpoints. Phase Two involved Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis of interviews with men in recovery who identified spirituality as important to their process. Findings Phase One data provided an overview of the issues underpinning spirituality and addiction recovery and generated five superordinate themes: The Spiritual Quest; Addiction Narratives: from initiation to rock bottom; I Have My Life Back: the road to recovery; Supporting Recovery and Delivering Treatment; and The Spiritual Journey of Recovery. Phase Two described personal accounts from addiction to recovery via various spiritual paths and generated three superordinate themes: Myths and Archetypes; Darkness and Light; and Lessons for Recovery. This phase was also associated with development of a novel shamanically-informed adjunct to the qualitative data analysis. Spirituality also facilitated self-awareness, reflexivity and gender identity among study participants. These findings informed the development of a novel labyrinth model which reflects the inner journey of recovery. Conclusions For the participants of this study, spirituality formed an important dimension of addiction recovery. Concepts of spirituality that emerged were typically eclectic and characterised by deepening spiritual awareness and connection with self, others, nature and (a) higher power. While Scotland faces an epidemic of drug-related deaths, especially among older men from the most deprived communities, study findings suggest that spirituality may provide a protective function by enhancing hope, meaning and purpose. Practice and policy implications include raising awareness of the relevance of spirituality, embedding spirituality within addiction recovery programmes, and reducing barriers to spiritually informed interventions for people in recovery.

Subjects/Keywords: Spirituality; Problem Substance Use; Addiction; Addiction Recovery; Labyrinth; Alcoholism Scotland; Alcoholism Treatment Scotland; Drug abuse Scotland; Drug abuse Treatment Scotland; Narcotic addicts Rehabilitation Scotland; Narcotic addicts Services for Scotland

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fuller, N. W. (2019). Following Ariadne's thread: a qualitative exploration of the relevance of spirituality in experiences of problem substance use and of spiritual engagement in processes of recovery, with particular reference to the experience of men living in Scotland. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Stirling. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31186

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fuller, Nicholas William. “Following Ariadne's thread: a qualitative exploration of the relevance of spirituality in experiences of problem substance use and of spiritual engagement in processes of recovery, with particular reference to the experience of men living in Scotland.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Stirling. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31186.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fuller, Nicholas William. “Following Ariadne's thread: a qualitative exploration of the relevance of spirituality in experiences of problem substance use and of spiritual engagement in processes of recovery, with particular reference to the experience of men living in Scotland.” 2019. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Fuller NW. Following Ariadne's thread: a qualitative exploration of the relevance of spirituality in experiences of problem substance use and of spiritual engagement in processes of recovery, with particular reference to the experience of men living in Scotland. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2019. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31186.

Council of Science Editors:

Fuller NW. Following Ariadne's thread: a qualitative exploration of the relevance of spirituality in experiences of problem substance use and of spiritual engagement in processes of recovery, with particular reference to the experience of men living in Scotland. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31186


University of Stirling

2. McPhee, Iain. The intentionally unseen: exploring the illicit drug use of non-treatment seeking drug users in Scotland.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Stirling

There is a perception that drug use is a serious and growing problem to be solved by medicine, social work and drug enforcement agencies. This thesis takes a critical standpoint again such populist views and interprets drug use as one of any number of normal activities that people engage. This qualitative research utilising a bricoleur ethnographic methodology focuses on the drug taking of non-treatment seeking illegal drug users. The data reveals that they manage several social identities and the potential stigma of being discovered as an illicit user of illegal drugs utilising several strategies to remain intentionally unseen. The thesis explores how and in what way socially competent drug users differ from visible treatment seeking drug users. In order to develop this understanding, several gatekeepers were identified and within their social networks the participants were recruited into this research. The participants (n=24) were recruited from a wide range of age groups (21-52) and geographical locations within Scotland. One to one interviews, a focus group, and several pair bonded partners were interviewed together providing rich sources of data. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically from a social constructionist perspective. The findings illuminate the ways in which the intentionally unseen identify and manage risks from drugs, drugs policy and the potential shame and stigma were their hidden social worlds revealed. The practical implications of the results of this thesis are explored and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Subjects/Keywords: drug use; illicit drugs use; qualitative research; hidden populations; illegal drugs; ethnography; bricoleur; bricolage; semi structured interviews; focus groups; prohibition; temperance movements; scotland; alcohol; Drug abuse Scotland; Drugs Social aspects; Recreational drugs

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McPhee, I. (2012). The intentionally unseen: exploring the illicit drug use of non-treatment seeking drug users in Scotland. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Stirling. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9921

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McPhee, Iain. “The intentionally unseen: exploring the illicit drug use of non-treatment seeking drug users in Scotland.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Stirling. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9921.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McPhee, Iain. “The intentionally unseen: exploring the illicit drug use of non-treatment seeking drug users in Scotland.” 2012. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

McPhee I. The intentionally unseen: exploring the illicit drug use of non-treatment seeking drug users in Scotland. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2012. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9921.

Council of Science Editors:

McPhee I. The intentionally unseen: exploring the illicit drug use of non-treatment seeking drug users in Scotland. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9921

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