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You searched for subject:(Downstream bioprocessing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Melbourne

1. YAP, BENJAMIN. Algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation.

Degree: 2016, University of Melbourne

High pressure homogenisation (HPH) is proven to be a scalable and energetically feasible unit operation for large-scale algal cell disruption in this thesis. Novel rheological characterisation of concentrated biomass (>25% w/w) is developed, leading to an optimisation of high solids processing through HPH. A significant reduction in biomass viscosity is demonstrated through mechanical shearing. Effects from upstream conditions (N-deprivation) and downstream processing are also investigated for accurate descriptions of underlying mechanisms of algal cell disruption and subsequent lipid recovery.

Subjects/Keywords: microalgae; biotechnology; downstream processing; homogenisation; cell disruption; product recovery; biofuels; process engineering; bioprocessing

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APA (6th Edition):

YAP, B. (2016). Algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/120653

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

YAP, BENJAMIN. “Algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/120653.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

YAP, BENJAMIN. “Algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation.” 2016. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

YAP B. Algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2016. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/120653.

Council of Science Editors:

YAP B. Algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/120653


McMaster University

2. Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing.

Degree: MASc, 2014, McMaster University

Micro-scale processing (MSP) techniques are miniaturized version of upstream and downstream conventional unit operations that are designed to accelerate the pace of bioprocess design and development. Previous ‘dead end’ filtration studies have demonstrated the usefulness of this concept for membrane filtration processes. However, these experiments were performed without stirring which is the most common strategy to control the effects of concentration polarization and fouling on filtration performance. In this work, the pressure-driven stirred conditions of a conventional stirred-cell module were integrated with a 96-well filter plate to develop a high throughput technique called ‘stirred-well filtration’ (SWF). The design allowed for up to eight constant flux filtration experiments to be conducted at once using a multi-rack programmable syringe pump and a magnetic lateral tumble stirrer. An array of pressure transducers was used to monitor the transmembrane pressure (TMP) in each well. The protein sieving behavior and fouling propensity of Omega™ ultrafiltration membranes were assessed via a combination of hydraulic permeability measurements and protein sieving tests in constant filtrate flux mode. The TMP profile during filtration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution was strongly dependent on the stirring conditions – for example the maximum TMP in the stirred wells were an average of 7.5, 3.8, and 2.6 times lower than those in the unstirred wells at filtrate fluxes of 12, 36, and 60 LMH (5, 15, and 25 μL/min) respectively. The consistency of the data across different wells for the same stirring condition was very good. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the SWF technique, the eight tests for a simple 22 factorial design-of-experiments (DOE) test with duplicates was run to evaluate the effect of solution pH and salt concentration on protein filtration. The combination of SWF with statistical methods such as DOE is shown to be an effective strategy for high-throughput optimization of membrane filtration processes.

Dissertation

Master of Applied Science (MASc)

Advisors/Committee Members: Latulippe, David, Chemical Engineering.

Subjects/Keywords: Microscale processing; High-throughput testing; Downstream bioprocessing; Stirred well filtration (SWF); BSA filtration; Micromixing; Fouling test; Omega™ membrane

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kazemi, A. S. (2014). Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. “Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing.” 2014. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed February 28, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. “Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing.” 2014. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Kazemi AS. Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2014. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153.

Council of Science Editors:

Kazemi AS. Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153


Loughborough University

3. Mancuso, Francesco. Bioprocessing of bacteriophages and bacteriocins : continuous culture and downstream purification.

Degree: PhD, 2019, Loughborough University

Antimicrobial resistance poses a major problem to health and new alternatives to antibiotics are required. Bacteriophages are viruses able to selectively kill bacteria and they can be exploited to treat infections. Another alternative to antibiotics that can be used to treat bacterial infections are bacteriocins, which are proteins produced by bacteria, meant to kill other strains competing for the same nourishment source. Future industrial demand for large quantities of bacteriophages and bacteriocins imposes the development of a scalable production platform. In this PhD thesis, research on bioprocessing of bacteriophages K and T3 and one bacteriocin belonging to the subcategory of colicins, E9, has been conducted. The aims were to find the parameters involved in production of phages and colicin E9 using shake flasks and then exploiting them to perform continuous production of both phages and colicin E9 and showing the different outcomes when using complex medium (LB) and a synthetic medium (SM) using glucose as only carbon source. For the colicin E9 bioprocessing, tests for expression were carried out to measure when and for how long to induce for optimal protein production and the best conditions for production were an induction of 3 h with 1 mM of IPTG in LB medium and >10 h of induction with 1 mM of IPTG in SM. These parameters were used for continuous production of colicin E9 that was carried out using a chemostat. Optimal dilution rates were used to ensure maximum productivity and a production of 1 mg mL-1 of colicin E9 was achieved using either LB and synthetic medium. Then, the influence of flowrates and of different growth media on the first step of purification was assessed using affinity chromatography, showing that the synthetic medium allowed higher recovery of the product in the chromatography step. Bioprocessing of the phages K and T3 was carried out in shake flasks and 5L fermenters, researching the best parameters for producing the highest titres. The effect on the final titre of a variety of multiplicities of infection (MOI), the ratio of phages out of bacteria at the moment of infection, was evaluated. For both phages the MOI that ensured the highest phage titre, 1011 PFU mL-1, was 0.01. The parameters measured were then used for continuous production of bacteriophage T3. Continuous phage T3 production was carried out using a novel reactors layout, composed by 3 separated stages. This set up allowed to divide the production of the host cells, carried out in the first reactor, from the infection, carried out in the second reactor, and from the final amplification step, carried out in the third reactor. The synthetic medium with glucose as only carbon source and the dilution rate (D, the volume of media that flows in the reactor per hour) were used to control the growth rate of the host, which strongly influenced the final production of bacteriophages. Different D iii were tested, from 0.1 to 0.6 h-1 and the independent control of the dilution rate of the first and the second reactor allowed to…

Subjects/Keywords: bacteriophages; phages; fermentation; upstream; downstream; bioprocessing; Recombinant Proteins Produced; Colicin E9 Expression; Continuous Culture; synthetic media; chemically defined media; Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration; Cross Flow Ultrafiltration; chromatography purification step; Ion Exchange Chromatography; size exclusion; liquid liquid extraction; octanol phase; endotoxin lipopolysaccharide; LPS; Diafiltration; NTA

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mancuso, F. (2019). Bioprocessing of bacteriophages and bacteriocins : continuous culture and downstream purification. (Doctoral Dissertation). Loughborough University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.26174/thesis.lboro.11368830.v1 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.799196

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mancuso, Francesco. “Bioprocessing of bacteriophages and bacteriocins : continuous culture and downstream purification.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Loughborough University. Accessed February 28, 2021. https://doi.org/10.26174/thesis.lboro.11368830.v1 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.799196.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mancuso, Francesco. “Bioprocessing of bacteriophages and bacteriocins : continuous culture and downstream purification.” 2019. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Mancuso F. Bioprocessing of bacteriophages and bacteriocins : continuous culture and downstream purification. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Loughborough University; 2019. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.26174/thesis.lboro.11368830.v1 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.799196.

Council of Science Editors:

Mancuso F. Bioprocessing of bacteriophages and bacteriocins : continuous culture and downstream purification. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Loughborough University; 2019. Available from: https://doi.org/10.26174/thesis.lboro.11368830.v1 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.799196

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